View Full Version : Christmas and New Year


AngelicaDeAlquezar
November 30, 2009, 01:05 PM
Navidadnfp - Christmas

{||}Spanish | English
{|}¡Feliz Navidad!|Merry Christmas!
{|}Navidad/Díanm de Navidad|Christmas Day
{|}navideño(a)adj|Christmas related
{|}serienf (de lucesnfp)|Christmas lights / string lights / string of lights
{|}nacimientonm/Belén[nm]|Nativity
{|}árbolnm (de Navidad)/árbol de pascuanf|Christmas tree
{|}muñeconm de nievenf|snowman
{|}esferanf|(spherical) ornament
{|}coronanf|wreath
{|}henonm|hay
{|}regalonm|present
{|}moñonm|bow
{|}botanf|stocking
{|}duendenm|elf (Santa's little helpers)
{|}Santa Clos / Papá Noel|Santa Claus
{|}trineonm|sledge / sled / sleigh
{|}renonm|reindeer
{|}Rodolfo (el reno de la nariznf roja) |Rudolf (the red-nosed reindeer)
{|}nochebuenanf|poinsettia
{|}Nochenf Buenanf|Christmas Eve
{|}piñatanf|piñata
{|}muérdagonm|mistletoe
{|}brindisnm|toast
{|}chimeneanf|chimney
{|}campananf|bell
{|}cascabel nm|(jingle) bell /sleigh bell
{|}velanf|candle
{|}bastónnm de caramelonm|candy cane
{|}coponm de nievenf|snowflake
{|}tarjetanf de Navidad|Christmas card
{|}juguetesnmp|toys
{|}reyesnmp magosnmp (Melchor, Gaspar y Baltasar)|the (three) Wise Men (of/from the East) / the (Three) Kings (from the Orient) / the Magi (Caspar/Gaspar/Jaspar, Melchior, and Balthasar)
{|}oronm|gold
{|}inciensonm|frankincense
{|}mirranf|myrrh
{|}escarchanf (Mexico)|frost / tinsel / garland
{|}espumillónnm (Spain)|garland
{|}Añonm Nuevonm|New Year
{|}¡Feliz Año Nuevo!|Happy New Year!
{|}Año Viejo|Old Year
{|}Nochenm Vieja|New Year's Eve
{|}fuegosnmp artificiales|fireworks
{|}propósitosnmp de año nuevo|New Year's resolutions
{|}envolturanf de regalonm/papel[g]nm de regalo|gift wrap / wrapping paper
{|}felicitaciónnf|greeting
{|}villanciconm|Christmas carol
{|}pannm de frutasnfp/pan de pascua|fruitcake
{|}galletanf de jengibrenm|gingerbread
{|}aguinaldonm|Christmas bonus

AngelicaDeAlquezar
November 30, 2009, 01:06 PM
Just to fit the season... I'm sure there will be a few regional variation additions, it will be nice to learn them. :)

Perikles
November 30, 2009, 01:22 PM
My dictionary: piñata: container hung up during festivites and hit with a stick to release candy

It looks like there is no English word

Año viejo: Old Year (:rolleyes:)

nacimientoNM/Belén: Nativity

jingle bell (?) : just 'bell'

magi (do they have proper names in English?) : NO

AngelicaDeAlquezar
November 30, 2009, 02:38 PM
Thanks, Perikles! I have attached a picture with a "cascabel" and a "campana". Are they still the same?

Perikles
November 30, 2009, 02:44 PM
Thanks, Perikles! I have attached a picture with a "cascabel" and a "campana". Are they still the same?I know the difference (casabel is something fixed to children's things sometimes), but as far as I know, there is no English word to differentiate beween them. Toy bell. Church bell. Cow bell. Bells. :(:)

AngelicaDeAlquezar
November 30, 2009, 02:48 PM
This is fine... I assume the use of some pictures will be needed to clarify some meanings anyway. :)

laepelba
November 30, 2009, 04:52 PM
I would call them "jingle bells" regardless of how they are used and regardless of the time of year. :) Cascabeles!

pjt33
November 30, 2009, 05:25 PM
magi (do they have proper names in English?) : NO
Depende. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biblical_Magi#Names
Muchas veces cuando imprimen el villancico "We Three Kings" ponen los nombres tradicionales como títulos de las estrofas que hablan de los regalos.

I would call them "jingle bells" regardless of how they are used and regardless of the time of year. :) Cascabeles!
How would you parse that? Is it an NP made up of a VP and an NP, or are you taking "jingle" as an adjective or noun?

laepelba
November 30, 2009, 05:28 PM
How would you parse that? Is it an NP made up of a VP and an NP, or are you taking "jingle" as an adjective or noun?

Hmmm... I'm not exactly sure what you are asking here. SORRY!! :(

Rusty
November 30, 2009, 05:55 PM
American English:

serie (de luces) = Christmas lights / string lights / string of lights
trineo = sled / sleigh
envoltura de regalo = gift wrap / wrapping paper
cascabeles = jingle bells / sleigh bells

los Reyes Magos = the Wise Men / the (three) Wise Men (of/from the East) / the (Three) Kings (from the Orient) / the Magi :
their number is uncertain, but set at three because three gifts were mentioned by Matthew :
there are various names given to them, but Caspar (Gaspar, Jaspar), Melchior, and Balthasar are the most popular; these have been used since the 8th century (derived from an Alexandrian text dated two centuries earlier)

Please provide a picture of escarcha. Is it the same as guirnalda? Tinsel can mean a garland (a chain made out of bright, shiny plastic strands) or the thin shiny plastic strands that hang over the branches of a Christmas tree to make it look like it has icicles hanging from the branches (this kind of tinsel is also called icicles). Could cinta brillante be used for tinsel / guirnalda?

(corona has an inadvertent / behind it)

AngelicaDeAlquezar
November 30, 2009, 06:50 PM
Thank you, Rusty. Additions and corrections are made.

"Escarcha" as tinsel can be a Mexican word only.
I find "cinta brillante" too general, but maybe it's used somewhere else to talk about a string of glittering strips or threads.

"Guirnalda" could be the more generalized word. :thinking:


"Cinta brillante" would suggest to me a flat and smooth ribbon.

laepelba
November 30, 2009, 07:06 PM
Garland is the stuff that is attached in a long rope/string:
http://www.faqs.org/photo-dict/photofiles/list/5546/7264Christmas_garland.jpg

Tinsel is the stuff that falls off in individual pieces.......
http://images.ecommetrix.com/commerce/33/xmasjuly/christmas%20in%20july%202009%20091.JPG

(Don't know how to make the thumbnail images......)

chileno
November 30, 2009, 07:34 PM
Garland is the stuff that is attached in a long rope/string:
http://www.faqs.org/photo-dict/photofiles/list/5546/7264Christmas_garland.jpg

Tinsel is the stuff that falls off in individual pieces.......
http://images.ecommetrix.com/commerce/33/xmasjuly/christmas%20in%20july%202009%20091.JPG

(Don't know how to make the thumbnail images......)

The first one is a guirnalda and the second is escarcha.

árbol de pascua = christmas tree

pan de pascua =mix of fruit cake and panettone

... in Chile. :)

AngelicaDeAlquezar
November 30, 2009, 08:44 PM
Changes proposed by Lou Ann and Hernán are made. :)


I've heard "pan de pascua" (or "pan de frutas") as "fruitcake"... is it a Mexicanism or is it normally called so in English-speaking countries? :D

chileno
November 30, 2009, 10:36 PM
Changes proposed by Lou Ann and Hernán are made. :)


I've heard "pan de pascua" (or "pan de frutas") as "fruitcake"... is it a Mexicanism or is it normally called so in English-speaking countries? :D

Yes... I changed it. :)

La "clorita" se está poniendo pesada... :(

:D

CrOtALiTo
November 30, 2009, 10:51 PM
Changes proposed by Lou Ann and Hernán are made. :)


I've heard "pan de pascua" (or "pan de frutas") as "fruitcake"... is it a Mexicanism or is it normally called so in English-speaking countries? :D

Where you have gotten the ( Pan de pascua ). I mean in that store sells it, I have never heard about that bread in my life, I'd like give it a little bite.:D

Elaina
November 30, 2009, 10:58 PM
Where you have gotten the ( Pan de pascua ). I mean in that store sells it, I have never heard about that bread in my life, I'd like give it a little bite.:D


Be careful what you wish for. Fruit cake has gotten a bad rap for a long time. Eventhough some chefs are trying to "bring it back", so to speak, it is still something that many people stay away from or re-gift it over and over again!:D

It has been alluded that Fruit cake can last for years and years....I don't know if that is true or not. :eek:

:footinmouth:

irmamar
December 01, 2009, 01:50 AM
Thank you, Rusty. Additions and corrections are made.

"Escarcha" as tinsel can be a Mexican word only.
I find "cinta brillante" too general, but maybe it's used somewhere else to talk about a string of glittering strips or threads.

"Guirnalda" could be the more generalized word. :thinking:


"Cinta brillante" would suggest to me a flat and smooth ribbon.

We call this "espumillón". :)

ROBINDESBOIS
December 01, 2009, 03:08 AM
Gingerbread girl
Sleighbells
Ornaments
Noisemakers
Carolers
Fireplace
Christmas crackers
Santa´s snack
NAtivity scene
Bulbs
Holly
Christmas bonus

pjt33
December 01, 2009, 03:37 AM
Hmmm... I'm not exactly sure what you are asking here. SORRY!! :(
There are various ways of forming noun phrases (NPs) in English. There's the simple noun (e.g. bell). There's adjective + NP (e.g. golden bell). There's NP + NP (e.g. sleigh bell).

The only context in which I know the phrase "jingle bell" is the song "Jingle bells", in which "jingle" is a verb used as an imperative. I'm not familiar with "jingle bell" as a noun phrase, and I'm trying to understand the construction. Is it just adopted from the song with a change from verb phrase (verb + subject) to noun phrase, or are you using jingle as an adjective or noun? (If you don't know then I may try asking a linguist).

poli
December 01, 2009, 06:39 AM
Gingerbread girl
Sleighbells
Ornaments
Noisemakers
Carolers
Fireplace (the yule log)
Christmas crackers:thumbsdown: Christmas cookies
Santa´s snack
NAtivity scene Sometimes these Belens are known as creche
Bulbs:thumbsdown: Christmas lights or Holiday lights
Holly
Christmas bonus:thumbsup:
Usually it's gingerbread man not girl but I suppose if there's on gender of gingerbread cookie there's another. Otherwise in theory they would never reproduce there wouldn't be any gingerbread cookies. :sad:

Eleana tiene razón fruitcake tiene una mala reputación y quisiera añadir que la merece. No obstante sirve bien como un quisio.

A propósito: Si una persona es nuttier than a fruitcake
significa que es desquisiado

A propósito: Una otra palabra Christmastime es Yuletide

laepelba
December 01, 2009, 07:23 AM
There are various ways of forming noun phrases (NPs) in English. There's the simple noun (e.g. bell). There's adjective + NP (e.g. golden bell). There's NP + NP (e.g. sleigh bell).

The only context in which I know the phrase "jingle bell" is the song "Jingle bells", in which "jingle" is a verb used as an imperative. I'm not familiar with "jingle bell" as a noun phrase, and I'm trying to understand the construction. Is it just adopted from the song with a change from verb phrase (verb + subject) to noun phrase, or are you using jingle as an adjective or noun? (If you don't know then I may try asking a linguist).

Ahhh!! Thanks for explaining. It was the "NP" stuff that I didn't follow with. I'm not very good with grammar. :)

YES, I use "jingle bells" as a noun phrase. I don't know of any commonly used name for that type of bell, and since we usually only see them at Christmas time anyway, it's easy to refer to them as "jingle bells", and everyone knows exactly what I'm referring to.

I would probably guess that the sense is from the song. But I never thought of the word "jingle" as an imperative when it's used in the song. I suppose you may be right. But when I consider the song (and just discussed this with a colleague), the word "jingle" is simply modifying "bells". "Jingle bells, jingle bells, jingle all the way...." just says to me that I'm hearing the jingling of bells (that specific kind of bell) and that it happens the entire time that the sleigh is moving along.

Not sure if that answer is sufficient........

By the way - you can't even imagine the kind of conversation two MATH teachers could have about a point of English grammar......... LOL!! :D

laepelba
December 01, 2009, 07:23 AM
By the way, I really do NOT like fruitcake...........

pjt33
December 01, 2009, 07:25 AM
"envolturaNF de regaloNM" es también "papel de regalo", por lo menos aquí.

¿Como se dice "Christmas Day"? O ¿es que no hay traducción adecuada? No me sorprendería porque parece importar mucho menos en las culturas hispanohablantes que en las anglosajonas.

poli
December 01, 2009, 07:35 AM
By the way, I really do NOT like fruitcake...........
It's like pipe tobacco

pjt33
December 01, 2009, 07:48 AM
By the way - you can't even imagine the kind of conversation two MATH teachers could have about a point of English grammar......... LOL!! :D
A que sí. La mitad de mis amigos universitarios eran estudiantes de mates. :p

chileno
December 01, 2009, 08:15 AM
Where you have gotten the ( Pan de pascua ). I mean in that store sells it, I have never heard about that bread in my life, I'd like give it a little bite.:D

Me too! :-)

Ours is not soft as panettone and it has walnuts in it. It goes stale so you cannot keep it for a long time.

*************

I thought garland = guirnalda

Rusty
December 01, 2009, 11:30 AM
@pjt33: Hmmm. I'm not a linguist, but for what's it's worth, here are my :twocents:

The noun 'jingle bell' is a particular type of bell. It is also known as a 'sleigh bell', which happens to be a noun composed of two words, too. It's possible that the 'sleigh' in 'sleigh bell' could be an adjective, a verb, or a noun. No dictionary I checked gave an etymology. It would be my guess that the 'jingle' in 'jingle bell' could also be an adjective, a verb, or a noun. The Random House dictionary says the word was coined around 1885.

Jingle bells can be bought in any city of America. You can buy a single bell, or you can buy them in a group. Many people hang them on walls, doors, doorknobs, or on a horse's harness.
Bands and orchestras buy a group of jingle bells mounted on a wood block with a handle. The percussionist holds the handle with one hand, the jingle bells hanging downward, and bounces the block into the palm of his/her other hand to make the bells ring.

My take on the song "Jingle Bells" is not the same as yours. I hear "Jingle bells (noun), Jingle bells (noun), Jingle (present tense 3rd-person plural verb) all the way." "Oh, what fun it is to ride in a one-horse open sleigh!"

Perikles
December 01, 2009, 11:49 AM
No dictionary I checked gave an etymology. It would be my guess that the 'jingle' in 'jingle bell' could also be an adjective, a verb, or a noun.
.
.
My take on the song "Jingle Bells" is not the same as yours. I hear "Jingle bells (noun), Jingle bells (noun), Jingle (present tense 3rd-person plural verb) all the way." "Oh, what fun it is to ride in a one-horse open sleigh!"Jingle is clearly onomatopoeic, and I would bet with pjt that jingle is an imperative in that annoying song. Having said that, Jingle bells (noun) is just as likely. In this particular case, I'm afraid I don't care much. :rolleyes:

Edit: Wiki says

Music historian James Fuld notes that the "the word jingle in the title and opening phrase is apparently an imperative verb (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Imperative_mood)."[3] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jingle_Bells#cite_note-2) However, it is commonly taken to mean a certain kind of bell (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jingle_bell).

So there we are. It is possible that at the time of writing the song, Pierpont meant the verb. On the basis of the expression in the song, the noun 'jingle bell' was invented, or just misunderstood. This is my theory, which is either brilliant, or total crap. :thinking::D

Jessica
December 01, 2009, 12:31 PM
is lanturn (sp??) in there? Or wait, the New Year has nothing to do with Chinese New Year right...?

irmamar
December 01, 2009, 12:33 PM
"envolturaNF de regaloNM" es también "papel de regalo", por lo menos aquí.

¿Como se dice "Christmas Day"? O ¿es que no hay traducción adecuada? No me sorprendería porque parece importar mucho menos en las culturas hispanohablantes que en las anglosajonas.

Día de Navidad o, simplemente, Navidad.

¿No conoces el villancico?

"Esta noche es Nochebuena
y mañana Navidad,
saca la bota María
que me voy a emborrachar.

Ande, ande, ande
la Marimorena,
ande, ande, ande
que es la Nochebuena"

:D

AngelicaDeAlquezar
December 01, 2009, 01:05 PM
My grandma used to bake fruitcake, always choosing fresh ingredients and it was delicious... but we all grew older and everyone around started avoiding sugar, fat and flour. :D

poli
December 01, 2009, 01:07 PM
You may want to add aguinaldo to the list

chileno
December 01, 2009, 01:10 PM
Jingle is clearly onomatopoeic, and I would bet with pjt that jingle is an imperative in that annoying song. Having said that, Jingle bells (noun) is just as likely. In this particular case, I'm afraid I don't care much. :rolleyes:

Edit: Wiki says

Music historian James Fuld notes that the "the word jingle in the title and opening phrase is apparently an imperative verb (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Imperative_mood)."[3] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jingle_Bells#cite_note-2) However, it is commonly taken to mean a certain kind of bell (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jingle_bell).

So there we are. It is possible that at the time of writing the song, Pierpont meant the verb. On the basis of the expression in the song, the noun 'jingle bell' was invented, or just misunderstood. This is my theory, which is either brilliant, or total crap. :thinking::D

:D But I like your theory... :)

irmamar
December 01, 2009, 01:12 PM
¿Y el turrón? Do you know what "turrón" is? I don't think there is a word for turrón or for polvorones. ;)

chileno
December 01, 2009, 01:14 PM
You may want to add aguinaldo to the list

That's a Christmas Bonus.

Nah, just add it to my pocket. :)

*************
Noche buena = Christmas Eve

hermit
December 01, 2009, 02:06 PM
Fruitcake can last a very long time, especially if it's got enough rum or brandy in it.

It does keep amazingly well, anyway.

laepelba
December 01, 2009, 02:08 PM
There are much better ways of consuming rum or brandy............ ;):applause::eek::D:dancingman::wicked::whistling: :raisetheroof:

pjt33
December 01, 2009, 02:50 PM
It's possible that the 'sleigh' in 'sleigh bell' could be an adjective, a verb, or a noun.
I wouldn't hesitate to classify it as an NP := NP NP construction. A sleigh bell is a bell (N) which is attached (or designed to be attached) to a sleigh (N).

My take on the song "Jingle Bells" is not the same as yours. I hear "Jingle bells (noun), Jingle bells (noun), Jingle (present tense 3rd-person plural verb) all the way." "Oh, what fun it is to ride in a one-horse open sleigh!"
Where by "present tense" you intend to imply also "indicative"? Interesting. I'm definitely resolved to ask a linguist for comment, because it's looking like an interesting question. My current operating theory is the same as Perikles'.

¿No conoces el villancico?
No conozco ningún villancico en español salvo algunas palabras de "Noche de paz". Si tuviera niños quizás tendría por que conocerlos, pero no estoy seguro si los niños cantan de emborracharse :D

No hay traducción para "turrón" ni "polvorones". Es que los conceptos no existen. (Además he descubierto que a la mayoría de mi familia no le gusta el turrón. A ver si este año llevo un paquete de polvorones conmigo cuando vaya a pasar la Navidad con ellos).

poli
December 01, 2009, 03:35 PM
Fruitcake can last a very long time, especially if it's got enough rum or brandy in it.

It does keep amazingly well, anyway.
And it can be used as a weapon

poli
December 01, 2009, 03:58 PM
¿Y el turrón? Do you know what "turrón" is? I don't think there is a word for turrón or for polvorones. ;)
Turrones se vende aquí y torrone(turron italiano) tambien.

laepelba
December 01, 2009, 04:08 PM
It's like pipe tobacco

In what way? That it is supposed to grow on you? Because I actually enjoy the scent of pipe tobacco, although I've never actually tried to smoke a pipe.

@pjt33: Hmmm. I'm not a linguist, but for what's it's worth, here are my :twocents:

The noun 'jingle bell' is a particular type of bell. It is also known as a 'sleigh bell', which happens to be a noun composed of two words, too. It's possible that the 'sleigh' in 'sleigh bell' could be an adjective, a verb, or a noun. No dictionary I checked gave an etymology. It would be my guess that the 'jingle' in 'jingle bell' could also be an adjective, a verb, or a noun. The Random House dictionary says the word was coined around 1885.

Jingle bells can be bought in any city of America. You can buy a single bell, or you can buy them in a group. Many people hang them on walls, doors, doorknobs, or on a horse's harness.
Bands and orchestras buy a group of jingle bells mounted on a wood block with a handle. The percussionist holds the handle with one hand, the jingle bells hanging downward, and bounces the block into the palm of his/her other hand to make the bells ring.

My take on the song "Jingle Bells" is not the same as yours. I hear "Jingle bells (noun), Jingle bells (noun), Jingle (present tense 3rd-person plural verb) all the way." "Oh, what fun it is to ride in a one-horse open sleigh!"

Thanks for this breakdown, Rusty ... makes sense.

Jingle is clearly onomatopoeic, and I would bet with pjt that jingle is an imperative in that annoying song. Having said that, Jingle bells (noun) is just as likely. In this particular case, I'm afraid I don't care much. :rolleyes:

Edit: Wiki says

Music historian James Fuld notes that the "the word jingle in the title and opening phrase is apparently an imperative verb (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Imperative_mood)."[3] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jingle_Bells#cite_note-2) However, it is commonly taken to mean a certain kind of bell (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jingle_bell).

So there we are. It is possible that at the time of writing the song, Pierpont meant the verb. On the basis of the expression in the song, the noun 'jingle bell' was invented, or just misunderstood. This is my theory, which is either brilliant, or total crap. :thinking::D

Yeah, the more I thought about it, the more I thought it might be imperative in intent. But we have morphed it into a noun phrase. :)

Día de Navidad o, simplemente, Navidad.

¿No conoces el villancico?

"Esta noche es Nochebuena
y mañana Navidad,
saca la bota María
que me voy a emborrachar.

Ande, ande, ande
la Marimorena,
ande, ande, ande
que es la Nochebuena"

:D

Can you find a YouTube video of that carol? In fact, can anyone post links to (or embed) some YouTube videos of Spanish carols? That would be SO cool!!

¿Y el turrón? Do you know what "turrón" is? I don't think there is a word for turrón or for polvorones. ;)

No - can you describe these things? OOPS - spoke to soon. I just found "polvorón" in RAE. Here: http://buscon.rae.es/draeI/SrvltConsulta?TIPO_BUS=3&LEMA=polvoron - sounds yummy!

irmamar
December 02, 2009, 02:32 AM
La Marimorena (en serio, sin la bota de María :D -there are several versions):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hIjmlXh1rSk

Turrón (http://buscon.rae.es/draeI/SrvltConsulta?TIPO_BUS=3&LEMA=turr%C3%B3n)

http://figupolo.files.wordpress.com/2007/12/turron.jpg

Polvorones:

http://www.sanenrique.com/imagenes/catalogo/polvoron-almendra-met.jpg

Jubilee
December 02, 2009, 07:04 AM
Many thanks for this thread

irmamar
December 02, 2009, 07:30 AM
Yes, it's interesting. :)

Feliz
September 02, 2010, 11:25 PM
Fruitcake can last a very long time, especially if it's got enough rum or brandy in it.

It does keep amazingly well, anyway.

Ditto. Exactly what I was thinking--and have experienced personally.:)

Wolves83
February 27, 2011, 08:06 PM
cool. I just learnt some new things today!

Esppiral
October 17, 2012, 11:38 AM
Paja-hay

JPablo
October 24, 2012, 12:44 PM
@Esppiral, al principio pensaba que decías que en este hilo "había paja"... (as in the thread full of "straw = rubbish") :eek: ... pero por fin me di cuenta de que decías, "paja = hay" :thumbsup:

¡Ay, ay, ay!

Yes, "paja = hay, straw" :)

Esppiral
October 29, 2012, 05:46 AM
Jaja vaya salidas tienes Jpablo xD

wrholt
October 29, 2012, 10:54 AM
...
Yes, "paja = hay, straw" :)

Erm, actually, hay and straw are not quite the same thing. "Paja" is straw, not hay. "Heno" is hay.

"Straw" is the stalks of cereal plants from which grain and chaff have been removed. It has a variety of uses, especially livestock bedding and fodder, fuel, thatching and basketmaking.

"Hay" is any combination of grasses, legumes or other herbaceous plants that has been cut, dried and stored for use as animal fodder.

(Sayeth the man who spent many a summer afternoon during his teens helping put up thousands of bales of hay, only to pull them out from the barns during the winter to feed the cows and horses. We weren't commercial farmers, but after six summers of putting up 3000+ bales each summer I will NEVER think of "hayrides" as "fun".)

JPablo
October 29, 2012, 12:51 PM
Good point!
El que sabe, sabe... y si no... pa cabo.

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