View Full Version : Más oraciones con el pretérito


laepelba
February 11, 2010, 06:47 PM
So, I'm still working on the Preterit chapter. In this exercise, I needed to translate several sentences. I didn't even get half of them right. :banghead:

Anyway - I only have questions about one of the sentences. (The rest I was able to figure out my error.)

English: Elisa and I could not get to your meeting at six o'clock.
My Spanish translation: Elisa y yo no pudimos asistir tu reunión a las sies.
Corrected translation (from the answer key): Elisa y yo no pudimos asistir tu llegar a la reunión a las sies.

1) Would "asistir" work in this sentence?
2) I don't understand why llegar works here. I thought llegar means to arrive. I don't understand.
[And, P.S., I didn't like that they used the English word "get". I'm disliking that word more and more....]
3) Why "a la" instead of "tu"?

¡¡¡Gracias!!!

chileno
February 11, 2010, 06:58 PM
So, I'm still working on the Preterit chapter. In this exercise, I needed to translate several sentences. I didn't even get half of them right. :banghead:

Anyway - I only have questions about one of the sentences. (The rest I was able to figure out my error.)

English: Elisa and I could not get to your meeting at six o'clock.
My Spanish translation: Elisa y yo no pudimos asistir tu reunión a las sies.
Corrected translation (from the answer key): Elisa y yo no pudimos asistir tu llegar a la reunión a las sies.

1) Would "asistir" work in this sentence?
2) I don't understand why llegar works here. I thought llegar means to arrive. I don't understand.
[And, P.S., I didn't like that they used the English word "get". I'm disliking that word more and more....]
3) Why "a la" instead of "tu"?

¡¡¡Gracias!!!

Asistir = attend

Does that help?

As to the word get...see what we have to go through? :D:D:D

laepelba
February 11, 2010, 07:00 PM
No. It doesn't help. What else do you do but attend a meeting?

I have three questions I would like answered......

AngelicaDeAlquezar
February 11, 2010, 07:33 PM
So, I'm still working on the Preterit chapter. In this exercise, I needed to translate several sentences. I didn't even get half of them right. :banghead:

Anyway - I only have questions about one of the sentences. (The rest I was able to figure out my error.)

English: Elisa and I could not get to your meeting at six o'clock.
My Spanish translation: Elisa y yo no pudimos asistir tu reunión a las sies.
Corrected translation (from the answer key): Elisa y yo no pudimos asistir tu llegar a la reunión a las sies.

1) Would "asistir" work in this sentence?
2) I don't understand why llegar works here. I thought llegar means to arrive. I don't understand.
[And, P.S., I didn't like that they used the English word "get". I'm disliking that word more and more....]
3) Why "a la" instead of "tu"?

¡¡¡Gracias!!!

1) & 2) Yes and no. I thought "get to" here meant to arrive. (?)
As Hernán said, "asistir" is "to attend". There is a difference in trying to get there :angel: and just not going... Or if you arrived late, you did attend.
3) I don't know! :D
Unless "your meeting" is a more general way to say "a meeting (any)", I don't see the point on changing "tu" for "a la".
Btw... can "meeting" mean both a group of friends having a nice time and a business group of people?
If it is so, "tu reunión" would be used for the group of friends (you're organising it) and "la reunión" would be used for the business people (more neutral). :thinking:


Edit: "Some more" is not translated as "algunas más", but like "otras" or simply "más", so: "más oraciones con el pretérito" or "otras oraciones con el pretérito" should be your thread title. ;)

laepelba
February 11, 2010, 07:39 PM
1) & 2) Yes and no. I thought "get to" here meant to arrive. (?)
As Hernán said, "asistir" is "to attend". There is a difference in trying to get there :angel: and just not going... Or if you arrived late, you did attend.
3) I don't know! :D
Unless "your meeting" is a more general way to say "a meeting (any)", I don't see the point on changing "tu" for "a la".
Btw... can "meeting" mean both a group of friends having a nice time and a business group of people?
If it is so, "tu reunión" would be used for the group of friends (you're organising it) and "la reunión" would be used for the business people (more neutral). :thinking:

1) I suppose ... I would never ever consider saying "I arrived at your meeting". I either attended (late or no) or I didn't attend. Or I "was at" a meeting. Is "llegar" commonly used in regard to a reunión in Spanish? As I consider this, I would really only use "arrive" to talk about "arriving at a place/physical location", not an event.
3) Maybe another of their "errors"? Hmm....

BTW: Usually, I would say "meeting" refers to some kind of business gathering. With friends, I would say "get together" or "party" or something along those lines....

Thanks for your answers!!

AngelicaDeAlquezar
February 11, 2010, 07:45 PM
Hmm... How would you apologize for arriving late to a meeting? :thinking:

laepelba
February 11, 2010, 08:01 PM
Hmm... How would you apologize for arriving late to a meeting? :thinking:

I would either say "Sorry I was late for the meeting" or "Sorry I missed the beginning of the meeting.". I suppose that to say "I arrived early/late for a meeting" sounds okay. But I would really usually use "arrive" with location....

You could, um, change the title of the thread. ;)

Perikles
February 12, 2010, 02:22 AM
[And, P.S., I didn't like that they used the English word "get". I'm disliking that word more and more....]'get' is a bad word to use. Get used to not using it. By the way - off-topic, but the first sentence I quote: is that standard AmE?

laepelba
February 12, 2010, 02:32 AM
'get' is a bad word to use. Get used to not using it. By the way - off-topic, but the first sentence I quote: is that standard AmE?

No, it's definitely not traditional usage. I tend to overuse the present progressive on purpose for exaggeration.... :)

edit: wait. The first sentence or the last? "I'm disliking it more & more..." isn't conventional. But what don't you like about the first sentence?

Perikles
February 12, 2010, 02:43 AM
I didn't like that they used the English word "get".

edit: wait. The first sentence or the last? "I'm disliking it more & more..." isn't conventional. But what don't you like about the first sentence?It is definitely not BrE. Well, it sounds wrong to me, which is not the same. I would have to say

I didn't like it that they used the English word "get".,

but normally I would say

I didn't like their using the word "get".

The way you said it sounds a bit Spanish :rolleyes:

laepelba
February 12, 2010, 05:08 AM
It is definitely not BrE. Well, it sounds wrong to me, which is not the same. I would have to say

I didn't like it that they used the English word "get".,

but normally I would say

I didn't like their using the word "get".

The way you said it sounds a bit Spanish :rolleyes:

Maybe I AM learning some Spanish!! :)

Well, yes, I suppose that my sentence is common usage here. What you said sounds a bit "stuffy". <refrains from making a comment about your being British...>

Perikles
February 12, 2010, 06:13 AM
What you said sounds a bit "stuffy". <refrains from making a comment about your being British...>Stuffy ????? :lengua::lengua:<refrains from cursing about bloody colonials polluting the language...> :D

laepelba
February 12, 2010, 06:41 AM
Stuffy ????? :lengua::lengua:<refrains from cursing about bloody colonials polluting the language...> :D

Oh, don't get all WHINGEY on me!! (See ... I CAN speak the King's English when I want to ... I just don't usually WANT to!)

So ... here's a good question to play with the minds of Europeans vs. those from the US: where does one find the "first floor" in a hotel/office building?

chileno
February 12, 2010, 07:19 AM
No. It doesn't help. What else do you do but attend a meeting?


1) Would "asistir" work in this sentence?
2) I don't understand why llegar works here. I thought llegar means to arrive. I don't understand.
[And, P.S., I didn't like that they used the English word "get". I'm disliking that word more and more....]
3) Why "a la" instead of "tu"?


3. it should have been "tu" as per original phrase in English, maybe they considered that to be too "literal"?

2 Asistir also means to help... :wicked:

1. What is the difference between "could not get to your meeting" and " could not make it to your meeting" for you? And YES asistir o atender could be used there.

laepelba
February 12, 2010, 07:22 AM
Thanks, Chileno! That was much more helpful! :)

Perikles
February 12, 2010, 09:10 AM
Oh, don't get all WHINGEY on me!! (See ... I CAN speak the King's English when I want to ... I just don't usually WANT to!)Your choice, but it would actually be Queen's English. It has been since 1952. :p

So ... here's a good question to play with the minds of Europeans vs. those from the US: where does one find the "first floor" in a hotel/office building?Surely, as a mathematician, you would start counting at zero? :)

irmamar
February 12, 2010, 11:08 AM
Oh, don't get all WHINGEY on me!! (See ... I CAN speak the King's English when I want to ... I just don't usually WANT to!)

So ... here's a good question to play with the minds of Europeans vs. those from the US: where does one find the "first floor" in a hotel/office building?

Whingey? What does it mean? :confused:

Planta baja, primer piso, segundo piso... Where do you find the first floor? :thinking:

laepelba
February 12, 2010, 11:24 AM
Surely, as a mathematician, you would start counting at zero? :)

Whingey? What does it mean? :confused:

Planta baja, primer piso, segundo piso... Where do you find the first floor? :thinking:

I'll let PERIKLES define "whingey" for you. I'm not British, so I have never actually USED that word! :)

In the United States, the "first" floor IS the ground floor. When a friend from London was visiting here, we had to visit an office with which she is affiliated. When we went up the elevator, I hit the buttons and she wasn't paying attention. When we left the office, she was standing next to the buttons and we must have stood there for a very awkward two whole minutes ... me, waiting for her to press the danged button ... she, wondering where the heck was the button for the ground floor. We finally figured out the confusion, and got the button "1" pressed to get out and walk to the car.....

irmamar
February 12, 2010, 11:35 AM
I'll let PERIKLES define "whingey" for you. I'm not British, so I have never actually USED that word! :)

In the United States, the "first" floor IS the ground floor. When a friend from London was visiting here, we had to visit an office with which she is affiliated. When we went up the elevator, I hit the buttons and she wasn't paying attention. When we left the office, she was standing next to the buttons and we must have stood there for a very awkward two whole minutes ... me, waiting for her to press the danged button ... she, wondering where the heck was the button for the ground floor. We finally figured out the confusion, and got the button "1" pressed to get out and walk to the car.....

:lol: :lol: A mí me hubiera pasado lo mismo. :lol: :lol:

Perikles
February 12, 2010, 11:37 AM
I'll let PERIKLES define "whingey" for you. I'm not British, so I have never actually USED that word! :)...That's a bit rich - she invents a word which doesn't exist, and then expects me to explain it. :D There is a verb to whinge which means to whine = quejarse so I guess whingey is an adjective to describe somebody who whinges a lot. Apparently to whinge is BrE colloquial and pejorative. :):)

And she used it above, describing me, though she claims she has never used it. :)

irmamar
February 12, 2010, 11:42 AM
That's a bit rich - she invents a word which doesn't exist, and then expects me to explain it. :D There is a verb to whinge which means to whine = quejarse so I guess whingey is an adjective to describe somebody who whinges a lot. Apparently to whinge is BrE colloquial and pejorative. :):)

And she used it above, describing me, though she claims she has never used it. :)

I'm not ready to understand your puns (my vocabulary is still poor :worried:).

But I understand you and I'll try to forget this no-word. Thanks. :)

laepelba
February 12, 2010, 02:39 PM
That's a bit rich - she invents a word which doesn't exist, and then expects me to explain it. :D There is a verb to whinge which means to whine = quejarse so I guess whingey is an adjective to describe somebody who whinges a lot. Apparently to whinge is BrE colloquial and pejorative. :):)

And she used it above, describing me, though she claims she has never used it. :)

I got the word (in the form in which I used it) from my British friend with American elevator issues. She sent me a long email about some issues she was having, and ended with: "Sorry to get all whingey on you." I assumed that she was using it in the correct part of speech.

I don't actually USE the word ... but it seemed appropriate in response to your post.....

Perikles
February 13, 2010, 01:42 AM
I assumed that she was using it in the correct part of speech.

I don't actually USE the word ... but it seemed appropriate in response to your post.....An interesting point - it is a habit in English to invent words by extension of a known word, making an adjective or a verb from a noun, where the meaning is obvious. It then takes years to appear in a dictionary. In the meantime the word has some undefined status, but it doesn't follow as being an incorrect part of speech. Somebody whingey is presumably whining or complaining about lots of little boring things.

laepelba
February 13, 2010, 04:42 AM
An interesting point - it is a habit in English to invent words by extension of a known word, making an adjective or a verb from a noun, where the meaning is obvious. It then takes years to appear in a dictionary. In the meantime the word has some undefined status, but it doesn't follow as being an incorrect part of speech. Somebody whingey is presumably whining or complaining about lots of little boring things.

You're SO right! I am always creating "new" parts of speech ... using words in ways that are convenient, not necessarily correct. What you said about how my friend used "whingey" is exactly the right context! :)

Ambarina
February 13, 2010, 10:10 AM
I've been following this conversation and I just wanted to add that I have heard "whingey" and also "to be a whinge" apart from the obvious "to whinge". I just wonder if it's a local thing, i.e. from London and thereabouts.

Perikles
February 13, 2010, 10:37 AM
I've been following this conversation and I just wanted to add that I have heard "whingey" and also "to be a whinge" apart from the obvious "to whinge". I just wonder if it's a local thing, i.e. from London and thereabouts.Being really picky and just guessing, the word is of Germanic origin, (from Old English hwinsian) and if regional, more likely to be in the north. But I heard (and have said) the verb often enough - Stop whingeing!!! from which the noun and adjective develop naturally. Notice by the way the ambiguous noun development: A whinge can be either a) the noise emitted when whingeing, a noun attested around year 1500, or, b) a new noun, the person herself :D who whinges a lot.

And notice the odd spelling, where you need an 'e' after the 'g' in order to soften it. :)

laepelba
February 13, 2010, 02:30 PM
Being really picky and just guessing, the word is of Germanic origin, (from Old English hwinsian) and if regional, more likely to be in the north. But I heard (and have said) the verb often enough - Stop whingeing!!! from which the noun and adjective develop naturally. Notice by the way the ambiguous noun development: A whinge can be either a) the noise emitted when whingeing, a noun attested around year 1500, or, b) a new noun, the person herself :D who whinges a lot.

And notice the odd spelling, where you need an 'e' after the 'g' in order to soften it. :)

Thanks - I wasn't sure how to pronounce it. I've never actually SAID the word OUT LOUD. :wicked: :rolleyes: :whistling:

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