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Caballero March 26, 2011 10:47 AM

Andalucian Spanish
 
I read somewhere that all the American Spanish varieties came from Andalucian Spanish. What are the biggest differences between Andalucian and American Spanish? Does Andalucian Spanish sound better to Latin Americans than the Castillian variety?

hermit March 26, 2011 12:09 PM

Since most of the "conquistadores" who colonized South, Central
and parts of North America were from southern Spain, it follows
that Andalucian Spanish (seseo) continues to be the language
of Latin America...

aleCcowaN March 26, 2011 02:22 PM

Spanish from the Canaries sounds a little bit alike its American counterparts.

Certain features like seseo are more a consequence of the languages also spoken in the same regions during 11st to 15th centuries in Andalusia, 14th and 15th centuries in Canary Islands and 16th to 18th centuries in America.

But I remember some analysis I read about Spaniards settled in America during the 16th century, and about 45% were Andalusian and Extremaduran -though the percentages within high rank people and women were a little lesser-.

Is there a "language of Latin America"? How curious!

Caballero March 26, 2011 11:53 PM

Quote:

Spanish from the Canaries sounds a little bit alike its American counterparts.
Is it instantly recognizable as a Canarian accent?

Perikles March 27, 2011 03:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Caballero (Post 108099)
Is it instantly recognizable as a Canarian accent?

Yes, but it is not so much an accent as a speech defect. Even the local newsreader on TV sounds as though he needs special medical attention. Seriously though, it involves the omission of a lot of consonants, particulary S, and the swallowing of the last syllable of each word, and the end of each sentence. Each sentence must start with one of two words which print as **** or ***** on this forum. The subjunctive mood does not exist and they have never heard of a perfect tense, always the preterite. They never use the second plural verb endings but use vosotros + 3rd plural.

Some claim this is all a influence of Portuguese, others claim the return from South America of pre-war emmigrants, and others have less flattering explanations.

You can detect dialect variations between the seven Canarian Islands, which is quite interesting, but they all sound quite different from the South American accents I have heard, which are not many.

conejodescarado March 27, 2011 06:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Perikles (Post 108101)
Seriously though, it involves the omission of a lot of consonants, particulary S, and the swallowing of the last syllable of each word, and the end of each sentence.

I don't know where the narrator of my Ángeles y demonios audiobook hails from, but he often omits the "s" sound. For example:

desconocido => de-con-o-cí-do

I've been trying to work out of this is widespread, or some regional thing.

aleCcowaN March 27, 2011 09:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Perikles (Post 108101)
Some claim this is all a influence of Portuguese, others claim the return from South America of pre-war emmigrants, and others have less flattering explanations.

Any thing but giving the guanches their proper place in history.

As a historical note, emigration from the Canaries to America was banned from 1574 to 1718. From 1718 to 1778 the Canaries had to pay "el tributo de sangre" in order to sell or buy goods from America, that is, one family from the islands had to settle in America in order to allow a traffic of 20 tons of goods. It surprised everybody to know during Katrina that thousands of descendants of these settlers were evacuated from the Mississippi Delta.

In spite of these and other historical events, there was little interaction between Canary Islands and America.

Caballero May 03, 2011 09:57 PM

So to the people from Latin America: which dialect sounds most familar to you, compared to your dialect, Castillian, Andalucian, or Canarian? Oh, and I heard that Colombian Spanish sounds a lot like Andalucian. Is this true?


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