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DailyWord January 21, 2010 11:02 PM

Forro
 
This is a discussion thread for the Daily Spanish Word for January 14, 2010

forro (masculine noun (el)) — lining, padding, cover, dust-cover, jacket, sheathing. Look up forro in the dictionary

¡Oh no! ¡Se me rompío el forro de mi chaqueta!
Oh no! I tore the lining of my jacket!

Siempre le dejo un forro a mis libros para que no se maltraten.
I always leave the cover on my books to protect them.

bobjenkins January 22, 2010 12:43 AM

Zorro, no corro porque mi forro del zapato está roto

Luna Azul April 04, 2011 09:56 PM

"Forro" is actually a very useful word. We use it when we don't know the real name of something that's covering something else. :o

It can be said instead of:
cubierta, funda, revestimiento, sobrecubierta, recubrimiento, envoltura, piel, etc.

It's also a conjugation of the verb "forrar" (to line, to cover) in the first person singular: "yo forro"

;)


123ccr May 23, 2011 08:27 AM

Can it be use for like YO ha forrado el subjecto en mi clase? I have covored the subjuct in my class

aleCcowaN May 23, 2011 08:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 123ccr (Post 111068)
Can it be use for like YO ha forrado el subjecto en mi clase? I have covored the subjuct in my class

No, you can't.

As a general rule, when a definition uses more than one concept this is precisely to avoid such mistakes. I mean, by saying "to line, to cover" it automatically excludes concepts like "to line a street with trees" and "to cover a subject in class".

AngelicaDeAlquezar May 23, 2011 08:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 123ccr (Post 111068)
Can it be use for like YO ha he forrado el subjecto en mi clase? I have covored the subjuct in my class

No, Rick. This "forro" is rather for a covering the way you'd cover a book with a plastic. :)

In the case of a class subject, it should be something like "(yo) completé/cubrí el tema de mi clase".


Oh, Alec beat me to reply, but one more answer won't harm. :)

123ccr May 23, 2011 10:55 AM

thankyou Ang.

micho April 06, 2012 05:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DailyWord (Post 69545)
This is a discussion thread for the Daily Spanish Word for January 14, 2010

forro (masculine noun (el)) — lining, padding, cover, dust-cover, jacket, sheathing. Look up forro in the dictionary

¡Oh no! ¡Se me rompío el forro de mi chaqueta!
Oh no! I tore the lining of my jacket!

Siempre le dejo un forro a mis libros para que no se maltraten.
I always leave the cover on my books to protect them.

Aparte de otras observaciones ya hechas, unas construcciones idiomáticas:

De uso muy común: Está forrado (He is very, very rich). Me he forrado (I made a lot of money). Se forraron (they made a lot of money).

También muy usado de forma (muy) vulgar: Pasarse algo por el forro de los cojones. Yo creo que aquí "forro de los cojones" equivale a escroto y la expresión quiere decir que no se le da importancia a algo o que no le atañe. Ejemplo: Me paso por el forro (de los cojones) lo que dicen los curas.
Es equivalente a "Me importa un bledo".

No ver el libro ni por el forro: No haber abierto el libro para estudiar. (Viene de no conocer ni las tapas del libro). Ejemplo: No vió el libro ni por el forro y por eso suspendió.

AMG October 10, 2013 07:54 PM

A synonymous is "vaina", that is the covering of some vegetables. Aunque aquí en Colombia la expresión "vaina" es usada también para referirse a un problema:
- ¿Cuál es la vaina suya? (What's the matter with you?)
- Esa vaina no funcionó (That thing didn't work)

AngelicaDeAlquezar October 10, 2013 07:59 PM

¿De verdad? ¿En Colombia la palabra "forro" significa "cáscara" o "vaina"? :thinking:


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