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-   -   Con todo (http://forums.tomisimo.org/showthread.php?t=23113)

dupond January 25, 2018 06:01 AM

Con todo
 
Hi everyone

Can "Con todo" be used at the beginning of a sentence to mean "With anything"?

E.g. Con todo, hay pros y contras.

That's how Google translates it, but I can't seem to confirm this elsewhere as all the examples use "with anything" at the middle or end of a sentence and translate it along the lines of "con cualquier cosa".


Thanks

AngelicaDeAlquezar January 25, 2018 08:52 AM

I don't think in this example "con todo" may work as "with anything". I feel it closer to "all in all": "Everything considered, there are advantages and disadvantages".

dupond January 25, 2018 05:37 PM

How would "with anything" be translated (in the context of "With anything, there are advantages and disadvantages)?

Rusty January 25, 2018 06:26 PM

The phrase 'con todo' has different meanings, depending on context, but it doesn't translate to 'with anything'.
The English phrase 'with anything' doesn't usually begin a sentence (except when it means 'as with anything').

To translate 'with anything', use 'con cualquier cosa'. This doesn't mean the same as 'as with anything', however. For that, use 'con todo' ('everything considered' or 'all in all'), as suggested by Angelica.

JPablo January 25, 2018 06:50 PM

DRAE gives,

con todo, con todo eso, o con todo esto

1. locs. advs. No obstante, sin embargo.

http://dle.rae.es/?id=ZxVCoJq

Oxford gives these examples,

con todo y con eso / con todo — (bien mirado) all in all
More example sentences
con todo, sigo pensando que … — all the same / even so I still think that …

In your example,
Con todo, hay pros y contras.

I would say,

However, there are pros and cons.

Saludos cordiales.

dupond January 26, 2018 03:53 AM

Cheers. Thanks

RobertoMadrid January 29, 2018 04:15 AM

Con todo
 
Another meaning of "con todo" when we use it with the verb "ir" that might be of your interest:

Ir con todo = To go all in

;)

JPablo January 29, 2018 10:13 AM

Yes, I agree with Roberto.

Also, it can have the literal meaning.

"Con todo lo que sabía..." = With everything he knew...


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