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-   -   Las Matemáticas — Mathematics (http://forums.tomisimo.org/showthread.php?t=4869)

pjt33 November 03, 2009 07:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Perikles (Post 59455)
That's why I asked for help, I don't know the formal rule here. I just wanted to say that you can't say it's been a long time since + (a negative), such as it's been a long time since I don't study maths :bad:

"It's been a long time since" is already a negative construction, so it's probably just a special case of the general prohibition against double negatives. Shrug.

Hermit, good point.

brute November 03, 2009 08:21 AM

How about doing binary (base2) arithmetic in Spanish, using just the digits 0 and 1?

Also in logic we can use the symbols 0 and 1 to represent two mutually opposite states such as on and off, or true and false? In this system the symbols . and + are used to mean AND and OR

Cloudgazer November 04, 2009 10:26 PM

integral de superficie = surface integral
integral de línea = line integral
integral múltiple = multiple integral
integración = integration

coordenadas polares = polar coordinates
coordenadas esféricas = spherical coordinates
coordenadas cilíndricas = cylindrical coordinates

diferenciable = differentiable
diferenciabilidad = differentiability
diferenciación = differentiation

continuidad = continuity
continuo = continuous

función derivable = differentiable function (in 1 dimension)
función diferenciable = differentiable function (in multiple dimensions)
función continua = continuous function
derivada parcial = partial derivative

conjunto = set
subconjunto = subset
intervalo = interval

dimensión = dimension
dominio = domain
rango = range

polinomio = polynomial

laepelba April 07, 2010 02:48 PM

Why didn't this thread show when I looked under Forums/Vocabulary/Vocabulary by topic? I had to do a search on forum titles.... ???

Anyway - it occurred to me this morning (while teaching about fractions to a group of Spanish speaking students) that I don't know how fractions are worded in Spanish.

one-half two-halves
one-third two-thirds
one-fourth two-fourths three-fourths
one-fifth two-fifths three-fifths
one-sixth
one-seventh
one-eighth
one-ninth
one-tenth

etc....

Thanks!

chileno April 07, 2010 06:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by laepelba (Post 78759)
Why didn't this thread show when I looked under Forums/Vocabulary/Vocabulary by topic? I had to do a search on forum titles.... ???

Anyway - it occurred to me this morning (while teaching about fractions to a group of Spanish speaking students) that I don't know how fractions are worded in Spanish.

one-half two-halves - medio/media -dos medios
one-third two-thirds - un tercio - dos tercios
one-fourth two-fourths three-fourths - un cuarto - dos cuartos-tres cuartos
one-fifth two-fifths three-fifths - un quinto- dos quintos - tres quintos
one-sixth - un sexto- dos sextos
one-seventh - un séptimo - dos séptimos
one-eighth - un octavo - dos octavos
one-ninth - un noveno- dos novenos
one-tenth - un décimo - dos décimos

etc.... - etc. ;)

Thanks!

:):):)

laepelba April 07, 2010 09:14 PM

Thanks, Hernan! Now, when you say "etc.", I'm not sure how to generically determine the "n-th" denominator. In English, we add "-th" if it's a unique number name (seventeenth, twentieth, etc.), and if it ends with "one" through "nine", the ending is the same as that number (twenty-third, fifty-ninth, etc.) How would I determine, say, how to say "eight elevenths" or "fifteen twenty-thirds", etc.?

Ambarina April 08, 2010 12:16 PM

onceavos = elevenths
doceavos = twelfths
treceavos = thirteenths...
veinteavos = twentieths

dos quinceavos = two fifteenths
trece dieciochavos = thirteen eighteenths

I think that's how it goes, in answer to your question Lou Ann. :)

laepelba April 08, 2010 12:20 PM

VERY helpful! Thanks!! :)

chileno April 08, 2010 01:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by laepelba (Post 78900)
VERY helpful! Thanks!! :)

Yes, thank you Ambarina.

However, I wanted to go to the "undécimo" form, and I could not remember what is it that they are called...

Ok, Lou Ann, you are a Math teacher...

Numbers: Cardinals, ordinals is there any other?

laepelba April 08, 2010 03:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chileno (Post 78909)
Yes, thank you Ambarina.

However, I wanted to go to the "undécimo" form, and I could not remember what is it that they are called...

Ok, Lou Ann, you are a Math teacher...

Numbers: Cardinals, ordinals is there any other?

What's "undécimo" form?

I think that most people would just say that there are cardinal and ordinal numbers. I've read somewhere about "nominal" numbers (numbers that name something like a number on a sports jersey or something like that), but I don't know how conventional that is. In a mathematics class, we talk about real numbers, rational and irrational numbers, integers, whole numbers and natural or counting numbers. Those are probably not practical or "every-day" numbers that anyone but a math teacher would use..... :p


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