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-   -   Llevarse un chasco (http://forums.tomisimo.org/showthread.php?t=10987)

poli May 24, 2011 07:48 AM

Llevarse un chasco
 
to be unpleasantly surprised?:thinking:

aleCcowaN May 24, 2011 09:04 AM

Yes, it may be. It's like being deeply disappointed or be in an embarrassing situation as a result of our wrong expectations. There's in it a component of "suddenly realizing something that causes that".

Perikles May 24, 2011 11:17 AM

Yes, my dictionary has:

chasco masculino

A (decepción) disappointment, let-down (familiar); me llevé or pegué un buen chasco I felt really let down o disappointed

B (broma) joke; una tienda que vende chascos a joke shop

AngelicaDeAlquezar May 24, 2011 11:31 AM

I'd never seen the use of "chasco" as a joke. I have always seen it as a disappointment about something gone wrong unexpectedly.

Luna Azul May 24, 2011 12:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by poli (Post 111120)
to be unpleasantly surprised?:thinking:

"I felt disappointed" - "I was disappointed"

I have never heard it as "joke"

aleCcowaN May 24, 2011 12:57 PM

"Chasco" includes pranks, especially those which relate with deception or traps and end up with a humiliated victim, like the pluricentennial bladder filled with water over the door. What meaning was first, the sudden prank or the sudden disappointment, it's hard to tell, but it's nice to read the definition in Diccionario de Autoridades - C (DRAE, first edition, 1729):

http://forums.tomisimo.org/picture.p...&pictureid=698
http://forums.tomisimo.org/picture.p...&pictureid=699
http://forums.tomisimo.org/picture.p...&pictureid=700

poli May 24, 2011 01:53 PM

A common term for prank in English is practical joke.

chileno May 24, 2011 09:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by aleCcowaN (Post 111137)
"Chasco" includes pranks, especially those which relate with deception or traps and end up with a humiliated victim, like the pluricentennial bladder filled with water over the door. What meaning was first, the sudden prank or the sudden disappointment, it's hard to tell, but it's nice to read the definition in Diccionario de Autoridades - C (DRAE, first edition, 1729):

Thank you for that one. I had forgotten the one about the látigo. I guess that's where "chasquear" comes from, and I wonder about "chascón" y "chasca" too.


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