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-   -   Las Matemáticas — Mathematics (http://forums.tomisimo.org/showthread.php?t=4869)

Tomisimo August 03, 2009 11:26 PM

Las Matemáticas — Mathematics
 

RestaNF - Subtraction


 Spanish  English 
 restaNF, sustracciónNF  subtraction 
 restar  to subtract, to minus 
 restar 5 de 10  subtract 5 from 10 
 minuendoNM  minuend 
 sustraendoNM  subtrahend 
 diferenciaNF  difference 
 Cuatro menos tres es igual a uno.  Four minus three equals one. 

SumaNF - Addition


 Spanish  English 
 sumar  to add, to sum 
 Dos más tres es igual a cinco.  Two plus three equals five. 

DivisiónNF - Division


 Spanish  English 
 dividir  to divide 
 Diez entre dos es igual a cinco.  Two into ten equals five. 
 Diez dividido por dos es igual a cinco.  Ten divided by two equals five. 

MultiplicaciónNF - Multiplication


 Spanish  English 
 multiplicar  to multiply 
 5 por 5 son 25  5 times 5 makes 25 
 Tres por dos es igual a seis.  Three times two equals six. 
 Tres multiplicado por dos es igual a seis.  Three multiplied by two equals six. 

CamposNMP - Fields


 Spanish  English 
 álgebraNM  algebra 
 cálculoNM  calculus 
 aritméticaNF  arithmetic 
 geometríaNF  geometry 
 análisisNM  analysis 
 topologíaNF  topology 
 probabilidadNF  probability 
 estadísticaNF  statistics 
 matemática discretaNF  discrete mathematics 
 teoría de númerosNF  number theory 
 aritméticaNF  arithmetic 
 combinatoriaNF  combinatorics 
 ecuaciones diferencialesNFP  differential equations 
 lógicaNF  logic 

TiposNMP de númeroNM - Types of number


 Spanish  English 
 número realNM  real number 
 enteroNM  integer 
 ceroNM  zero 
 negativo  negative 
 positivo  positive 
 racional  rational 
 irracional  irrational 
 fracción  fraction 

General


 Spanish  English 
 igualdadNF  equality 
 descomposiciónNF en factoresNMP  factoring 
 factorNM  factor 
 ecuaciónNF  equation 
 variableNF  variable 
 coordenadaNF  coordinate 
 verificaciónNF  proof 
 raíz cúbicaNF  cubed root 
 raíz cuadradaNF  square root 
 piNM  pi 
 exponenteNM  exponent 
 signo radicalNM  radical sign 
 a la quinta potencia  to the fifth power 
 potenciaNF  power 
 incógnitaNF  unknown 
 sistemaNM de coordenadasNFP Cartesianas  Cartesian coordinate system 
 ejeNM de las x  x axis 
 ejeNM de las abscisas  x axis 
 ejeNM de las y  y axis 
 ejeNM de las ordenadas  y axis 
 senoNM  sine 
 cosenoNM  cosine 
 tangenteNF  tangent 
 divisiónNF  ratio 
 hipotenusaNF  hypotenuse 
 cateto adyacenteNM  adjacent leg, adjacent side 
 cateto opuestoNM  opposite leg, opposite side 
 ángulo rectoNM  90 degree angle, right angle 
 triángulo rectánguloNM  right triangle, right angle triangle 
 triángulo equiláteroNM  equilateral triangle 
 triángulo isóscelesNM  isosceles triangle 
 triángulo escalenoNM  scalene triangle 
 teoremaNM  theorem 
 polígonoNM  polygon 
 pendienteNF  slope, gradient 
 triánguloNM  triangle 
 ánguloNM  angle 
 gradoNM  degree 
 unidadesNFP  units, ones 
 décimasNFP  tens 
 centésimasNFP  hundreds 
 milésimasNFP  thousands 
 integral  integral 
 derivada  derivative 
 logaritmoNM  logarithm, log 
 logaritmoNM neperiano  napierian logarithm, natural logarithm, natural log 
 límiteNM  limit 
 límite tiende a infinito  limit tends to infinity 


irmamar August 04, 2009 03:10 AM

La variable es femenino y pi también es correcto.

I'd like to know, in English:

- Menos (and igual a) (from?):
4 - 3 =
Cuatro menos tres es igual a

- Más (and?):
2 + 3 =
Dos más tres igual a

- Dividido por (o entre) (divided?):
5 : 2 =
Cinco entre dos (o dividido por dos) es igual a

- Multiplicado por:
3 · 2 =
Tres por dos igual a

bobjenkins August 04, 2009 12:09 PM

Se puede decir, Math
O en Inglaterra "Maths" (Pienso)

AngelicaDeAlquezar August 04, 2009 06:32 PM

@David: "la variable" is correct. And "el (número) pi". :)

In Mexico we use "las matemáticas" in plural. :)

Some additions:

Campos (los) - Fields
Trigonometría (la) - trigonometry


Seno (el) - sine
Coseno (el) - cosine
Tangente (la) - tangent
División (la) - ratio
Hipotenusa (la) - hypotenuse
Cateto adyacente (el) - adjacent leg
Cateto opuesto (el) - opposite leg
Ángulo recto (el) - 90 degree angle
Triángulo rectángulo (el) - right triangle
Triángulo equilátero (el) - equilateral triangle
Triángulo isósceles (el) - isosceles triangle
Triángulo escaleno (el) - scalene triangle
Teorema (el) - theorem
Polígono (el) - Polygon
pendiente (la) - Slope

Tomisimo August 04, 2009 09:40 PM

All suggestions have been added. Thanks! :)

irmamar August 05, 2009 02:02 AM

Integral: integral
Derivada: derivative
Límite: (limit?)
Límite tiende a infinito: (limit tends to infinite?)
Logaritmo: logarithm
Logaritmo neperiano: ? logarithm

Coordinate is coordenada.

ROBINDESBOIS August 05, 2009 10:49 AM

Números pares e impares = even and odd

Números primos = prime numbers

ROBINDESBOIS August 05, 2009 10:51 AM

It would be nice to remember counting units, tens and hundrends (unidades, decimas y centesimas) especially because The British and The americans do it differently.

brute August 05, 2009 03:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AngelicaDeAlquezar (Post 44647)
@David: "la variable" is correct. And "el (número) pi". :)

In Mexico we use "las matemáticas" in plural. :)

Some additions:

Campos (los) - Fields
Trigonometría (la) - trigonometry


Seno (el) - sine
Coseno (el) - cosine
Tangente (la) - tangent
División (la) - ratio
Hipotenusa (la) - hypotenuse
Cateto adyacente (el) - adjacent leg (or side)
Cateto opuesto (el) - opposite leg (or side)
Ángulo recto (el) - 90 degree angle (or right angle)
Triángulo rectángulo (el) - right triangle (or right angle triangle)
Triángulo equilátero (el) - equilateral triangle
Triángulo isósceles (el) - isosceles triangle
Triángulo escaleno (el) - scalene triangle
Teorema (el) - theorem
Polígono (el) - Polygon
pendiente (la) - Slope (or gradient)

A few more additions

brute August 05, 2009 03:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by irmamar (Post 44692)
Integral: integral
Derivada: derivative
Límite: (limit?)
Límite tiende a infinito: (limit tends to infinite?) tends to infinity
Logaritmo: logarithm log
Logaritmo neperiano: ? napierian or natural logarithm or log

Coordinate is coordenada.

A few small additions.

pjt33 August 25, 2009 04:50 PM

Division:
El resto**: remainder
El resto de 10 entre 3 es 1: the remainder of 10 divided by 3 is 1; 10 divided by 3 leaves 1

** ¡Muy distinto de "la resta"!

Campos:
La geometría: geometry
La combinatoria: combinatorics
La probabilidad: probability
La estadística: statistics

Classification of mathematical statements (group with el teorema):
El axioma: axiom
La conjetura: conjecture
La hipótesis: hypothesis

Important general terms:
El conjunto: set
El grupo: group
El cuerpo: field
El binomio: binomial
El polinomio: polynomial
La relación binaria: binary relation
La función: function
inyectiva: injective
sobreyectiva: surjective

Types of number:
imaginario: imaginary
complejo: complex

laepelba September 02, 2009 05:41 AM

As I start my school year (it's almost Fall in the northern hemisphere), I'll start making a list as I encounter them of Algebra terms that I think would be important (and for which I'd like to know the Spanish equivalents). I will have an entire class this year of ESOL students ("English as a Second Language"), the grand majority of whom are Spanish speakers with very little (if any) background in English. This class will be team taught with an ESOL expert (who is a VERY dynamic teacher!). Neither of us is very fluent in Spanish....

Here's a list from our first week of discussions about content:
Inverse
Opposite (i.e. Additive Inverse)
Reciprocal (i.e. Multiplicative Inverse)
Commutative Property
Associative Property
Distributive Property
Identity (in other words, Additive Identity or Multiplicative Identity)
Operations (which includes addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, etc.)
Grouping Symbols
Parentheses
Expression
Terms (in an expression)
Like Terms

laepelba November 02, 2009 11:36 AM

My ESOL/Algebra class this year is going well. 25 out of the 28 students are native Spanish speakers and usually enjoy the fact that I am trying to learn to speak Spanish. Although on Friday I heard something like "No me gusta que la profesora puede entender el español" or something similar. :)

Anyway - I have been trying to do one-on-one explanations with the Spanish speakers using as much Spanish as I can (when I know I am correct). We use the word "equis" a lot. :) But I have found that I don't know how to say "x squared" in Spanish. I know that "square" is "cuadro". Is "x squared" said as "x cuadrado"? So if I were reading an expression, I would say something like this: (x^2 + 3x) would be "equis cuadrado más tres equis". ??? "Cuadrado"???

Perikles November 02, 2009 12:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by irmamar (Post 44496)
I'd like to know, in English:

- Menos (and igual a) (from?):
4 - 3 =
Cuatro menos tres es igual a

- Más (and?):
2 + 3 =
Dos más tres igual a

- Dividido por (o entre) (divided?):
5 : 2 =
Cinco entre dos (o dividido por dos) es igual a

- Multiplicado por:
3 · 2 =
Tres por dos igual a

Four minus three equals...
Two plus three equals ...
Five divided by two equals...
Three times two equals... :)

irmamar November 02, 2009 12:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by laepelba (Post 59270)
My ESOL/Algebra class this year is going well. 25 out of the 28 students are native Spanish speakers and usually enjoy the fact that I am trying to learn to speak Spanish. Although on Friday I heard something like "No me gusta que la profesora puede entender el español" or something similar. :)

Anyway - I have been trying to do one-on-one explanations with the Spanish speakers using as much Spanish as I can (when I know I am correct). We use the word "equis" a lot. :) But I have found that I don't know how to say "x squared" in Spanish. I know that "square" is "cuadro". Is "x squared" said as "x cuadrado"? So if I were reading an expression, I would say something like this: (x^2 + 3x) would be "equis cuadrado más tres equis". ??? "Cuadrado"???

"Al cuadrado" (x³ al cubo, y después a la cuarta, a la quinta, etc. [potencia])

Equis al cuadrado más tres equis. :)

irmamar November 02, 2009 12:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Perikles (Post 59337)
Four minus three equals...
Two plus three equals ...
Five divided by two equals...
Three times two equals... :)

Thanks, Perikles :)

laepelba November 02, 2009 12:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by irmamar (Post 59338)
"Al cuadrado" (x³ al cubo, y después a la cuarta, a la quinta, etc. [potencia])

Equis al cuadrado más tres equis. :)

Thank you very much! So could you say either "equis al cuadrado" OR "equis a la segunda"?

irmamar November 02, 2009 01:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by laepelba (Post 59343)
Thank you very much! So could you say either "equis al cuadrado" OR "equis a la segunda"?

I've always said "al cuadrado o al cubo", never "a la segunda o a la tercera". But I'm not sure if in other countries it's possible (or even in mine). Sorry :sad:

Es como las raíces: raíz cuadrada, raíz cúbica y después raíz cuarta, etc. Yo no diría raíz segunda ni tercera :thinking:

laepelba November 02, 2009 04:05 PM

In English, we can say "x squared" OR "x to the second power" and "x cubed" OR "x to the third power". Both are equally acceptable, and I teach both.

With the roots, I would only ever say "square root", but could easily exchange "third root" for "cube root".

English is a strange language.......... :)

AngelicaDeAlquezar November 02, 2009 08:35 PM

En México se dice "equis cuadrada".

x cubed is an "equis al cubo"... sometimes (not too often) "equis cúbica"

Raise to a power is "elevar a la [cuarta, quinta, etc.] potencia"

As for the roots, it's the same as Irma has said.


By the way, Lou Ann, all the letters (and variables) in Spanish are always referred to in feminine. ;)

irmamar November 03, 2009 01:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by laepelba (Post 59390)
In English, we can say "x squared" OR "x to the second power" and "x cubed" OR "x to the third power". Both are equally acceptable, and I teach both.

With the roots, I would only ever say "square root", but could easily exchange "third root" for "cube root".

English is a strange language.......... :)

Yes, I've made a search and you can say "x a la segunda o a la tercera". That's correct, but it's more common "al cuadrado y al cubo" ;) (it's been a long time I don't study maths) :)

Perikles November 03, 2009 01:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by irmamar (Post 59440)
(it's been a long time I don't study maths) :bad:

it's been long time since I studied maths.:good: :rolleyes::)

irmamar November 03, 2009 01:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Perikles (Post 59443)
it's been long time since I studied maths.:good: :rolleyes::)

I can say, in Spanish:

Hace mucho tiempo que no estudio matemáticas
Ha pasado mucho tiempo desde que estudiaba matemáticas.

But thanks again :)

Perikles November 03, 2009 01:55 AM

I have not studied maths for a long time
It has been a long time since I studied maths
A long time has passed since ...

no se puede utilizar since con negativa :thinking:

irmamar November 03, 2009 01:57 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Perikles (Post 59448)
I have not studied maths for a long time
It has been a long time since I studied maths
A long time has passed since ...

no se puede utilizar since con negativa :thinking:

OK, I didn't know. Thanks :)

Perikles November 03, 2009 02:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by irmamar (Post 59449)
OK, I didn't know. Thanks :)

Aqui las normas en Inlgés son complicadas.

Help!! pjt33????

pjt33 November 03, 2009 04:00 AM

I haven't studied maths since secondary school. :good:
I haven't studied maths since I was at secondary school. :good:
Since he failed to get that job he's been moping about the house. :good:
Since he didn't get that job he's been moping about the house. :good::thinking: Feels fairly informal to me. I'd avoid this construction myself because "since" has the alternative meaning of "because" and here I have a sense that I'm trying to understand it in that sense, failing, and falling back on the sense of "in the period of time from then to now".

Entonces no sé cuál es la regla que Perikles invoca, pero tampoco sé por qué lo ha mencionado, puesto que (¡since!) la frase de Irma no contenía la palabra "since".


Hace mucho tiempo que + verbo perfecto = Verbo perfecto + for a long time.
E.g. Hace mucho tiempo que soy profesor = I've been a teacher for a long time.
Hace mucho tiempo que no estudio las mates = I haven't studied maths for a long time.

Rusty November 03, 2009 04:26 AM

In the U.S., we always use math instead of maths.
It's been a long time since I studied math.
I hate math.
Who is your math teacher?
When do you have math?

Perikles November 03, 2009 04:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by irmamar (Post 59440)
it's been a long time I don't study maths

Quote:

Originally Posted by Perikles (Post 59443)
it's been long time since I studied maths.

Quote:

Originally Posted by pjt33 (Post 59453)
Entonces no sé cuál es la regla que Perikles invoca, pero tampoco sé por qué lo ha mencionado, puesto que (¡since!) la frase de Irma no contenía la palabra "since"..

That's why I asked for help, I don't know the formal rule here. I just wanted to say that you can't say it's been a long time since + (a negative), such as it's been a long time since I don't study maths :bad:

hermit November 03, 2009 05:45 AM

Saying "Ever since he didn't get that job..." avoids confusion
re: since/because.

hermit

pjt33 November 03, 2009 06:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Perikles (Post 59455)
That's why I asked for help, I don't know the formal rule here. I just wanted to say that you can't say it's been a long time since + (a negative), such as it's been a long time since I don't study maths :bad:

"It's been a long time since" is already a negative construction, so it's probably just a special case of the general prohibition against double negatives. Shrug.

Hermit, good point.

brute November 03, 2009 07:21 AM

How about doing binary (base2) arithmetic in Spanish, using just the digits 0 and 1?

Also in logic we can use the symbols 0 and 1 to represent two mutually opposite states such as on and off, or true and false? In this system the symbols . and + are used to mean AND and OR

Cloudgazer November 04, 2009 09:26 PM

integral de superficie = surface integral
integral de línea = line integral
integral múltiple = multiple integral
integración = integration

coordenadas polares = polar coordinates
coordenadas esféricas = spherical coordinates
coordenadas cilíndricas = cylindrical coordinates

diferenciable = differentiable
diferenciabilidad = differentiability
diferenciación = differentiation

continuidad = continuity
continuo = continuous

función derivable = differentiable function (in 1 dimension)
función diferenciable = differentiable function (in multiple dimensions)
función continua = continuous function
derivada parcial = partial derivative

conjunto = set
subconjunto = subset
intervalo = interval

dimensión = dimension
dominio = domain
rango = range

polinomio = polynomial

laepelba April 07, 2010 01:48 PM

Why didn't this thread show when I looked under Forums/Vocabulary/Vocabulary by topic? I had to do a search on forum titles.... ???

Anyway - it occurred to me this morning (while teaching about fractions to a group of Spanish speaking students) that I don't know how fractions are worded in Spanish.

one-half two-halves
one-third two-thirds
one-fourth two-fourths three-fourths
one-fifth two-fifths three-fifths
one-sixth
one-seventh
one-eighth
one-ninth
one-tenth

etc....

Thanks!

chileno April 07, 2010 05:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by laepelba (Post 78759)
Why didn't this thread show when I looked under Forums/Vocabulary/Vocabulary by topic? I had to do a search on forum titles.... ???

Anyway - it occurred to me this morning (while teaching about fractions to a group of Spanish speaking students) that I don't know how fractions are worded in Spanish.

one-half two-halves - medio/media -dos medios
one-third two-thirds - un tercio - dos tercios
one-fourth two-fourths three-fourths - un cuarto - dos cuartos-tres cuartos
one-fifth two-fifths three-fifths - un quinto- dos quintos - tres quintos
one-sixth - un sexto- dos sextos
one-seventh - un séptimo - dos séptimos
one-eighth - un octavo - dos octavos
one-ninth - un noveno- dos novenos
one-tenth - un décimo - dos décimos

etc.... - etc. ;)

Thanks!

:):):)

laepelba April 07, 2010 08:14 PM

Thanks, Hernan! Now, when you say "etc.", I'm not sure how to generically determine the "n-th" denominator. In English, we add "-th" if it's a unique number name (seventeenth, twentieth, etc.), and if it ends with "one" through "nine", the ending is the same as that number (twenty-third, fifty-ninth, etc.) How would I determine, say, how to say "eight elevenths" or "fifteen twenty-thirds", etc.?

Ambarina April 08, 2010 11:16 AM

onceavos = elevenths
doceavos = twelfths
treceavos = thirteenths...
veinteavos = twentieths

dos quinceavos = two fifteenths
trece dieciochavos = thirteen eighteenths

I think that's how it goes, in answer to your question Lou Ann. :)

laepelba April 08, 2010 11:20 AM

VERY helpful! Thanks!! :)

chileno April 08, 2010 12:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by laepelba (Post 78900)
VERY helpful! Thanks!! :)

Yes, thank you Ambarina.

However, I wanted to go to the "undécimo" form, and I could not remember what is it that they are called...

Ok, Lou Ann, you are a Math teacher...

Numbers: Cardinals, ordinals is there any other?

laepelba April 08, 2010 02:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chileno (Post 78909)
Yes, thank you Ambarina.

However, I wanted to go to the "undécimo" form, and I could not remember what is it that they are called...

Ok, Lou Ann, you are a Math teacher...

Numbers: Cardinals, ordinals is there any other?

What's "undécimo" form?

I think that most people would just say that there are cardinal and ordinal numbers. I've read somewhere about "nominal" numbers (numbers that name something like a number on a sports jersey or something like that), but I don't know how conventional that is. In a mathematics class, we talk about real numbers, rational and irrational numbers, integers, whole numbers and natural or counting numbers. Those are probably not practical or "every-day" numbers that anyone but a math teacher would use..... :p

pjt33 April 08, 2010 03:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by laepelba (Post 78912)
What's "undécimo" form?

I think that most people would just say that there are cardinal and ordinal numbers. I've read somewhere about "nominal" numbers (numbers that name something like a number on a sports jersey or something like that), but I don't know how conventional that is. In a mathematics class, we talk about real numbers, rational and irrational numbers, integers, whole numbers and natural or counting numbers. Those are probably not practical or "every-day" numbers that anyone but a math teacher would use..... :p

Algebraic, transcendental, imaginary, complex, surreal, ... But this is a different distinction from cardinal vs ordinal (in either sense - 3 vs 3rd or set-theoretic).

And I don't think many people talk about "quaternion numbers" (just "quaternions"), but computer games programmers use them a lot.

laepelba April 08, 2010 03:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pjt33 (Post 78915)
Algebraic, transcendental, imaginary, complex, surreal, ... But this is a different distinction from cardinal vs ordinal (in either sense - 3 vs 3rd or set-theoretic).

And I don't think many people talk about "quaternion numbers" (just "quaternions"), but computer games programmers use them a lot.

Yes - I think that so many of those "groups" or "designations" of numbers are only used in mathematics...

But ... I have never heard of "quaternions". What exactly are they??

chileno April 08, 2010 05:32 PM

Ok I got it.

Go to http://spanish.about.com/od/spanishv.../a/ordinal.htm

for a complete list of ordinals.

and this one: http://www.learn-spanish-online.de/g..._fractions.htm

for a list of fractional numbers. :-)

laepelba April 08, 2010 07:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by laepelba (Post 78916)
Yes - I think that so many of those "groups" or "designations" of numbers are only used in mathematics...

But ... I have never heard of "quaternions". What exactly are they??

Quote:

Originally Posted by chileno (Post 78938)
Ok I got it.

Go to http://spanish.about.com/od/spanishv.../a/ordinal.htm

for a complete list of ordinals.

and this one: http://www.learn-spanish-online.de/g..._fractions.htm

for a list of fractional numbers. :-)

Thanks for the links! They are fantastic! :)

By the way - you didn't answer my question about the "quaternions". What are they? :)

pjt33 April 09, 2010 12:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by laepelba (Post 78916)
But ... I have never heard of "quaternions". What exactly are they??

Chileno didn't mention them: I did. They're one of the division ring* extensions of the reals (along with complex numbers and octonions). Short version: they're what complex numbers would be if they had three orthogonal imaginary parts. They turn out to give a useful representation for rotations in 3D.

* This is a correction from earlier.

chileno April 09, 2010 12:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pjt33 (Post 78961)
Chileno didn't mention them: I did. They're one of the field extensions of the reals (along with complex numbers and octonions). Short version: they're what complex numbers would be if they had three orthogonal imaginary parts. They turn out to give a useful representation for rotations in 3D.

Trigonometry and Calculus, right?

pjt33 April 09, 2010 11:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chileno (Post 78963)
Trigonometry and Calculus, right?

Algebra.

laepelba April 09, 2010 01:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pjt33 (Post 79011)
Algebra.

Not basic Algebra, though. Complex numbers aren't even introduced until a post-Geometry Algebra II course....

pjt33 April 09, 2010 01:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by laepelba (Post 79026)
Not basic Algebra, though. Complex numbers aren't even introduced until a post-Geometry Algebra II course....

I know more about the future subjunctive in Spanish than I do about US mathematics syllabi. Buscares por donde buscares dudo que encontrares nada sobre ello en ningún libro moderno de gramática porque ya no existe, pero de todas formas me es más útil.

laepelba April 09, 2010 09:47 PM

Basic Algebra really only gets into very simple equation solving and line graphing. There are some other brief introductory topics like statistical graphing and a VERY brief intro to parabolas and quadratic equations, etc. Everything is VERY basic! Complex numbers would be out of the question!


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