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DailyWord May 01, 2008 04:04 AM

Leche
 
This is a discussion thread for the Daily Spanish Word for May 1, 2008

leche -feminine noun (la), milk. Look up leche in the dictionary

Yo me tomo un vaso de leche todas las mañanas.
I drink a glass of milk every morning.

Alfonso May 01, 2008 05:02 AM

It's really tempting to link this daily word, leche, to Jane's today post, el colmo, as:
  • Es el colmo.
  • Es la leche.
... mean the same, with the latter being vulgar, and the former not. Do you use it the same way in other Hispanic countries?

poli May 01, 2008 07:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alfonso (Post 7455)
It's really tempting to think that today's daily leche and Jane's post about el colmo have the same meaning. :bad:daily word, leche, to Jane's today post, el colmo, as::bad:
  • Es el colmo.
  • Es la leche.
with the later (pronounced ladder) being vulgar , :bad:the last vulgar:bad: and the former not. Do you use it the same way in other Hispanic countries?

Let's see what Rusty and David, Elaina, Gomey and the rest say, but I've never heard the the term es la leche before. In Spain can it be used negatively and positively as colmo is?

You probably know that leche alone is quite vulgar here. In English
cream is, but it's only vulgar as a verb.

Rusty May 01, 2008 08:51 AM

I can't think of a phrase using milk that means last straw, height, epitome, or brim.

I wanted to add that the vulgarity associated with milk and cream, as Poli mentioned, is not widespread. We say (and buy) milk and cream all the time without thinking about the possibility that it may be taken the wrong way (that it may seem vulgar to some). There are many words that have both a good and a vulgar meaning.

Alfonso May 01, 2008 09:14 AM

Poli, eres la leche ;), no puedo entender esta corrección:
Quote:

It's really tempting to think that today's daily leche and Jane's post about el colmo have the same meaning. :bad:daily word, leche, to Jane's today post, el colmo, as::bad:
You can use eres la leche, esto es la leche, positively or negatively. In both cases you are being a little vulgar, but can be funny not being serious all the time.

Tomisimo May 01, 2008 10:30 AM

I personally have never heard es la leche used in this context before. This usage may be restricted to Spain, although my main experience has been with Mexican Spanish.

poli May 01, 2008 10:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alfonso (Post 7455)
It's really tempting to link this daily word, leche, to Jane's today post, el colmo, as:
  • Es el colmo.
  • Es la leche.
... mean the same, with the latter being vulgar, and the former not. Do you use it the same way in other Hispanic countries?

__________________________________________________ _________
I never heard it either, David. I deal with people from other parts of Latin America and I haven't heard them use it use it either.
__________________________________________________ ___________
A clarified correction:
I'm tempted to link today daily word, leche to Jane's post aboutel colmo.
.Es la leche
.Es el colmo
The former is vulgar. The latter is not. Is the term es la
leche used in other Spanish speaking countries?

This time I corrected your question as close a possible to the way you wrote the sentence. Is the term es la leche truly vulgar, or is it meerly slang?

Iris May 01, 2008 11:21 AM

Talking about milk, I've always been intrigued by the use of the Spanish word in La Leche League, I wonder why they haven't translated the whole thing.

Tomisimo May 01, 2008 11:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Iris (Post 7508)
Talking about milk, I've always been intrigued by the use of the Spanish word in La Leche League, I wonder why they haven't translated the whole thing.

La Leche League doesn't really have anything to do with the Spanish language. They try to promote breastfeeding and to support breastfeeding mothers. For some reason they decided to use a foreign word in the name of their organization.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Wikipedia
Early in the organization's history, local newspapers rejected meeting notices that used the words breastfed and breastfeeding, calling them inappropriate for family publications. The name comes from the two-syllable Spanish word, "leche" (pronounced leh-cheh) meaning "milk". It was inspired by a shrine in St. Augustine, Florida, with the title of `Nuestra Senora de la Leche y Buen Parto” or “our Lady of Happy Delivery and Plentiful Milk”.


poli May 01, 2008 12:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rusty (Post 7469)
I can't think of a phrase using milk that means last straw, height, epitome, or brim.

I wanted to add that the vulgarity associated with milk and cream, as Poli mentioned, is not widespread. We say (and buy) milk and cream all the time without thinking about the possibility that it may be taken the wrong way (that it may seem vulgar to some). There are many words that have both a good and a vulgar meaning.

Rusty,
Of course that's true, but the verb to cream is quite impolite and the noun
leche not milk can have a very vulgar context

Poli


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