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Search: Posts Made By: Rusty
Forum: Grammar December 07, 2019, 10:29 AM
Replies: 3
Views: 81
Posted By Rusty
If the main verb is in one of the past tenses or...

If the main verb is in one of the past tenses or the conditional mood, the imperfect subjunctive is used.

No me gustó que hubiera basura en la calle.

¡Sería injusto que nos quitaran nuestra...
Forum: Vocabulary December 03, 2019, 09:49 PM
Replies: 5
Views: 171
Posted By Rusty
In America, a teacher "grades (the) students" or...

In America, a teacher "grades (the) students" or "gives students a grade," based on how well they did on a test (oral or written). We don't use the word "mark."

I'm not sure what they would say in...
Forum: Grammar December 03, 2019, 09:35 PM
Replies: 1
Views: 33
Posted By Rusty
There's no difference. Both sentences are correct...

There's no difference. Both sentences are correct (except that '3' should be spelled out).

Removing the relative pronoun and substituting a subject pronoun, we can make two sentences for each one...
Forum: Vocabulary December 02, 2019, 08:32 PM
Replies: 5
Views: 171
Posted By Rusty
I believe "Put a mark on an exam" would make...

I believe "Put a mark on an exam" would make sense in British English.

In American English: 'Grade a test.' or, less common, 'Give/Assign a grade for/to a test.'
"I'd give it (the test) an 8, or...
Forum: Grammar November 30, 2019, 07:11 AM
Replies: 2
Views: 60
Posted By Rusty
When they mean "despite anything to the...

When they mean "despite anything to the contrary/in spite of that," they are synonymous terms.

Tyrn's example, in a subject complement role, isn't the adverbial phrase you're curious about....
Forum: Grammar November 28, 2019, 01:41 PM
Replies: 6
Views: 70
Posted By Rusty
Verbs that indicate movement are followed by the...

Verbs that indicate movement are followed by the preposition 'a'.
That explains what is wrong with your first example.

There's nothing wrong with your last two examples.
The first of the three...
Forum: Grammar November 28, 2019, 12:42 PM
Replies: 6
Views: 70
Posted By Rusty
The meaning is exactly the same. In the first...

The meaning is exactly the same.
In the first example, you've employed an indirect object pronoun; in the second, an indirect object.
You can also use both in the same sentence.
Se me acercaron a...
Forum: Grammar November 28, 2019, 10:22 AM
Replies: 9
Views: 990
Posted By Rusty
Caution: a 'gerund' in English is not a...

Caution: a 'gerund' in English is not a 'gerundio' in Spanish.
A gerund always acts as a noun in English grammar.
The equivalent in Spanish would be to use the infinitive.
Me gusta nadar. = I like...
Forum: Idioms & Sayings November 28, 2019, 09:40 AM
Replies: 1
Views: 192
Posted By Rusty
This is an idiomatic expression (idiom). Its...

This is an idiomatic expression (idiom). Its meaning is 'a short amount of time.'

Literally:
antes de = before (earlier than)
lo que se tarda en = the duration of time (on someone's part) = how...
Forum: Grammar November 26, 2019, 12:59 PM
Replies: 2
Views: 107
Posted By Rusty
When the conjunction 'que' is used at the...

When the conjunction 'que' is used at the beginning of a clause (a clause contains a verb), the speaker is expressing a wish. The conjunction isn't translated into English, but it should be easy to...
Forum: Translations November 22, 2019, 09:11 PM
Replies: 4
Views: 176
Posted By Rusty
llegar a

llegar a
Forum: Grammar November 21, 2019, 09:04 AM
Replies: 4
Views: 97
Posted By Rusty
What you wrote in the thread title is what I'll...

What you wrote in the thread title is what I'll address first.

Both 'how do you dare' and 'how dare you' are used, but they are certainly not interchangeable.

We say 'how dare you' when we are...
Forum: Grammar November 17, 2019, 06:27 AM
Replies: 1
Views: 71
Posted By Rusty
October is always capitalized. As written,...

October is always capitalized.
As written, these phrases look like titles (fragments), so title case is in order. In English, we capitalize the first letter of all nouns when using title case.
...
Forum: Grammar November 16, 2019, 02:03 PM
Replies: 3
Views: 95
Posted By Rusty
Fíjate en lo que se explica aquí...

Fíjate en lo que se explica aquí (http://laspreposiciones.com/verbs-and-prepositions.html). No encontrarás el verbo en cuestión, sino la frase 'Verbs that are followed by a often are referred to as...
Forum: Translations November 16, 2019, 01:30 AM
Replies: 1
Views: 110
Posted By Rusty
Perhaps this will do: Tome una respiración...

Perhaps this will do:
Tome una respiración profunda y limpiadora.
Forum: Grammar November 15, 2019, 11:26 PM
Replies: 10
Views: 235
Posted By Rusty
The pronoun 'se' is quite versatile and is used...

The pronoun 'se' is quite versatile and is used all the time.

To learn more, search for a specific usage of 'se':

{|}reflexive 'se' | (reflexive pronoun)
{|}impersonal 'se' | (¿Cómo se dice? o...
Forum: Grammar November 15, 2019, 08:30 AM
Replies: 10
Views: 235
Posted By Rusty
The first 'se' is used to make the subject...

The first 'se' is used to make the subject impersonal, as I stated.
The suffixed 'se' (on 'relacionarse') is the reflexive pronoun I mentioned.
There is no passive construction in your sentence.
Forum: Grammar November 14, 2019, 07:12 AM
Replies: 10
Views: 235
Posted By Rusty
The verb permitir takes both a direct object and...

The verb permitir takes both a direct object and an indirect object. Therefore, 'le' should be used to refer to the woman. The direct object is the noun phrase following the verb, 'relacionarse con...
Forum: Grammar November 14, 2019, 07:00 AM
Replies: 3
Views: 61
Posted By Rusty
The proper phrase is 'en aquel entonces.'

The proper phrase is 'en aquel entonces.'
Forum: Grammar November 14, 2019, 06:57 AM
Replies: 3
Views: 69
Posted By Rusty
It is not correct to use a masculine...

It is not correct to use a masculine demonstrative adjective prior to a feminine noun (when its first syllable is stressed and it begins with 'a' or 'ha').

esta agua (not este)
esa agua (not ese)
Forum: Vocabulary November 12, 2019, 09:38 AM
Replies: 2
Views: 251
Posted By Rusty
Los camellos tienen jorobas, o gibas. Ambas se...

Los camellos tienen jorobas, o gibas. Ambas se usan, pero me parece que joroba es la más habitual.
Forum: Idioms & Sayings November 01, 2019, 12:32 AM
Replies: 5
Views: 1,865
Posted By Rusty
When someone strikes another person, especially a...

When someone strikes another person, especially a spouse or a child, we say they "rule with an iron fist/hand." But it usually means they act authoritatively, without mercy.
When someone slaps...
Forum: Grammar October 29, 2019, 09:14 AM
Replies: 1
Views: 1,087
Posted By Rusty
En este caso, las dos sirven igual. No importa si...

En este caso, las dos sirven igual. No importa si se usa "the present perfect tense" (el pretérito perfecto compuesto) o "the past tense" (el pretérito perfecto simple).
(Hay casos en los que no...
Forum: Grammar October 29, 2019, 08:41 AM
Replies: 1
Views: 99
Posted By Rusty
Lo que escribiste sirve (según las correcciones...

Lo que escribiste sirve (según las correcciones notadas), pero sería mejor decir:
"I'll try to help you. May I have your name again, please?"

Para no suponer que ya te ha dado el nombre antes de...
Forum: Idioms & Sayings October 28, 2019, 07:30 AM
Replies: 1
Views: 476
Posted By Rusty
Nothing lasts forever. Even the longest night...

Nothing lasts forever.
Even the longest night has an end.
This too shall pass.
Showing results 1 to 25 of 500

 

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