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Old April 24, 2022, 02:06 PM
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AngelicaDeAlquezar AngelicaDeAlquezar is offline
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Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Mexico City
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Native Language: Mexican Spanish
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As Rusty said, context is everything.

If you say "dar de alta" in a hospital, it means the patient can be sent home. If you use "dar de alta" in another context for example willing to be a part of a community, then it means to make that person a member.
With the examples you quoted:
- Es parte del proceso de dar de alta. -> Since there is no context here, it could mean you are annoyed having to apply or sign papers to be a part of a community, or that you can't go from hospital because the doctor didn't authorize your discharge.
- Pierce preguntó si podía dar de alta al triple A... -> No explicit context, but most likely the "guys were working on" a patient that doesn't need hospital care anymore.
- Dice que va a dar de alta la cooperación de... -> (Note: The sentence does need the article I inserted, and also I'm not sure that you can enlist someone's cooperation instead of the person themselves). Anyway, here, it's understood that we are welcoming Salim's cooperation, we're making him a formal part of the project. Same case about detective Bell.
- ...no nos obliga a dar de alta. -> It seems we're hiring new personnel, but our community is not the one for which this sentence uses "dar de alta". When a company hires new workers, they have to pay taxes for them, and we would have to set up their data in the government's lists. Yet, if it's only guards, we don't have to do that.

And as Rusty said too, "dar de baja" may have different meanings, but it's always the same idea: to remove from a list or community.
- Me di de baja de la universidad. -> I'm not attending college anymore.
- Vamos a dar de baja a este paciente -> This patient is no longer a client of the hospital. (Note it's not the same as a patient who is going home after being hospitalized, because he may still be a client there.)
- A Juan lo dieron de baja del ejército. -> Juan is no longer a soldier in the army.
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