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Old January 17, 2012, 08:25 AM
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aleCcowaN aleCcowaN is offline
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Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
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Native Language: Castellano
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Quote:
Originally Posted by poli View Post
In that case the pescadores are clearly the English equivalents of fat cats. The whole phrase may not be commonly used but the circumstance of the pescador certainly is.

Here's a wiki article about the term:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fat_cat_(term)

further illustration
http://www.wordhippo.com/what-is/sen.../fat_cats.html
It looks those fat cats hold specific positions in society, what makes me think more in terms of peces gordos (figuratively, big predatory fishes at the top of the food chain) or maybe it is a fat cat el que corta el bacalao (those with power to allow -or not- poor people to get their daily bread: el/la mandamás - los mandamases).

That idiom's pescadores are not specifically spotted or alluded there otherwise than as generic third parties who benefit from internal disturbance. They perfectly may be opportunistic petty criminals, like those mentioned by chileno:

Quote:
Originally Posted by chileno View Post
Like petty thieves that pickpocket in any kind of convoluted situation, like a street fight and prey on innocent onlookers.
or even those who exploit that divide et impera on an industrial scale, but it also includes circumstantial beneficiaries that are law abiding and morally oriented.
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