Ask a Question

(Create a thread)
Go Back   Spanish language learning forums > Other Languages > Other Languages


British

 

Being the language lovers that we are... A place to talk about, or write in languages other than Spanish and English.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11  
Old January 09, 2012, 04:49 PM
Glen Glen is offline
Pearl
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 463
Native Language: English
Glen is on a distinguished road
In the TV series Downtown Abbey I think I heard it pronounced Downt'n rather than Downtown. Is that the accepted pronunciation or did I misunderstand?
Reply With Quote
   
Get rid of these ads by registering for a free Tomísimo account.
  #12  
Old January 09, 2012, 06:00 PM
aleCcowaN's Avatar
aleCcowaN aleCcowaN is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
Posts: 2,328
Native Language: Castellano
aleCcowaN is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by Glen View Post
In the TV series Downtown Abbey I think I heard it pronounced Downt'n rather than Downtown. Is that the accepted pronunciation or did I misunderstand?
DownTON Abbey!

[What will happen with poor Mr. Bates?]
__________________
si razona el caballO ¡se acabó la equitacióN! - césaR brutO
[English student. Plees, forgibb my misteakes!]
Do not argue with an idiot. He will drag you down to his level and beat you with experience.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old January 21, 2012, 06:27 PM
Baltipal Baltipal is offline
Opal
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Birmingham, UK.
Posts: 9
Native Language: British English
Baltipal is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by Glen View Post
In the TV series Downtown Abbey I think I heard it pronounced Downt'n rather than Downtown. Is that the accepted pronunciation or did I misunderstand?
I always smile when I hear Americans visiting my country say they are going to "StratFORD upON avON" I think it's cute!

Can anyone translate this?


Last edited by AngelicaDeAlquezar; January 21, 2012 at 07:03 PM. Reason: Merged back-to-back posts
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old January 21, 2012, 10:00 PM
Rusty's Avatar
Rusty Rusty is offline
Señor Speedy
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 8,967
Native Language: American English
Rusty has a spectacular aura aboutRusty has a spectacular aura about
I got all but one word right. Do you want it 'translated', or are you just having a bit of fun?
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old January 22, 2012, 06:00 AM
Baltipal Baltipal is offline
Opal
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Birmingham, UK.
Posts: 9
Native Language: British English
Baltipal is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rusty View Post
I got all but one word right. Do you want it 'translated', or are you just having a bit of fun?
Just a bit of fun, I live a few miles from Dudley so had less problem understanding it, the difference between 'Black Country yam-yam' dialect & my own natural 'brummie'.
I must add that it is a mocked up road sign not a for real one.

Which word couldn't you get BTW?

Last edited by Rusty; January 22, 2012 at 07:25 AM. Reason: merged back-to-back posts
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old January 22, 2012, 06:22 AM
aleCcowaN's Avatar
aleCcowaN aleCcowaN is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
Posts: 2,328
Native Language: Castellano
aleCcowaN is on a distinguished road
The Swedish chef would have written "Iff yuoo ere-a defft eeuoogh tu cume-a doon hiri, yuoor tie veell be-a spueelid" instead.
__________________
si razona el caballO ¡se acabó la equitacióN! - césaR brutO
[English student. Plees, forgibb my misteakes!]
Do not argue with an idiot. He will drag you down to his level and beat you with experience.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old January 22, 2012, 07:29 AM
Rusty's Avatar
Rusty Rusty is offline
Señor Speedy
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 8,967
Native Language: American English
Rusty has a spectacular aura aboutRusty has a spectacular aura about
Quote:
Originally Posted by Baltipal View Post
Just a bit of fun, I live a few miles from Dudley so had less problem understanding it, the difference between 'Black Country yam-yam' dialect & my own natural 'brummie'.
I must add that it is a mocked up road sign not a for real one.

Which word couldn't you get BTW?
It was 'wum', oddly enough. After I found the 'translation' online, I couldn't believe I let the leading 'w' mess with my brain so much that I couldn't make it out.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old January 22, 2012, 11:00 AM
Baltipal Baltipal is offline
Opal
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Birmingham, UK.
Posts: 9
Native Language: British English
Baltipal is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rusty View Post
It was 'wum', oddly enough. After I found the 'translation' online, I couldn't believe I let the leading 'w' mess with my brain so much that I couldn't make it out.
"HOME" What else! lol
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old January 23, 2012, 06:25 AM
ROBINDESBOIS's Avatar
ROBINDESBOIS ROBINDESBOIS is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 3,543
ROBINDESBOIS is on a distinguished road
I find American ENglish easier to understand and pronounce. British English has a larger vocabulary.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old August 31, 2012, 10:29 AM
BenCondor BenCondor is offline
Pearl
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 205
Native Language: English-US
BenCondor is on a distinguished road
American English, in the standard form heard on national broadcasts, has more relaxed vowels than British English and I've heard several students of English claim that it is easier to pronounce. As for having a "larger" vocabulary, I personally doubt it, since it is almost the same. That is, as an American English speaker I can pick up a British English newspaper, scholarly article, novel or basically anything and understand it perfectly. There are differences such as the famous bonnet=hood; boot=trunk difference [speaking of a car]. AE speakers don't usually use "daft" to mean crazy, (though it would be understood). But it's not as if, as an American English speaker, I'm using a dictionary half the size of a British English dictionary!

There are plenty of differences in slang, of course, but I doubt there is much more British slang such as to significantly enlarge the vocabulary.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmark this thread at:

 

Link to this thread
URL: 
HTML Link: 
BB Code: 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts
BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Site Rules

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
American/ British English usage? Here4good Translations 36 March 13, 2010 01:56 AM
British English: cena irmamar Vocabulary 15 November 04, 2009 11:24 AM
English-British dictionary (ies) chileno Teaching and Learning Techniques 10 October 29, 2009 05:33 PM
British english bobjenkins Culture 5 August 10, 2009 01:03 PM
British expats in Spain forced to return home Tomisimo General Chat 9 May 19, 2009 02:03 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:05 AM.

Forum powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

X