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Me licencié/gradué

 

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  #1  
Old October 18, 2015, 08:19 AM
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Me licencié/gradué

Ambos significan "I graduated" (pienso) pero cuál es mas comun.

Me licencié/gradué el año pasado. I graduated last year.

Como siempre, gracias.
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  #2  
Old October 18, 2015, 11:19 AM
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"Me recibí" in Argentina.

From your options "gradué" sounds better to me because "licencié" supposes a "licenciatura" and not all diplomas are "licenciaturas" and it also supposes you may have gotten a license for something else, like driving or having a gun.
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Old October 18, 2015, 01:42 PM
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I agree with Alec. "Graduarse" is generally understood and it applies for almost all courses and schools.

"Recibirse" in Mexico is usually understood for a college degree.

"Licenciarse" in some regions is also to have a permission to leave your job temporarily.
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Old October 19, 2015, 07:00 AM
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Como siempre gracias a todo.
Es más o menos como yo pensaba.
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Old October 19, 2015, 07:44 PM
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Maybe it varies from country to country, but I hear my wife (Colombian) use the word "graduar" a lot. I don't think I've ever heard her say "licenciar" at all.
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Old October 26, 2015, 05:33 PM
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En España, nos "graduamos" si estábamos estudiando un grado y nos "licenciamos" si estudiábamos una licenciatura. Hasta hace apenas unos años, los grados incluían estudios de 4 o más años y los grados de 3 o menos. Sin embargo, con el plan educativo actual, casi todas las carreras reconocidas como licenciaturas han pasado a grados.

Un saludo.
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