#11  
Old January 08, 2011, 03:06 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by irmamar View Post
For instance, I have this one:

Formal language: to pass away.
Everyday language: to die.
Casual language: to bite the dust.
Discrepo. "To pass away" es eufemismo cotidiano, no es formal.

No estoy seguro de la diferencia que quieres hacer entre "everyday language" y "casual language" - me parece que significan lo mismo.

Además hay que tener cuidado para distinguir entre registros de estilo y diferencias clasistas. Por ejemplo, "lavatory", "toilet", "shitter" - la mayoría de las personas usarían solo una de las tres.
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  #12  
Old January 08, 2011, 08:55 AM
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Do you need to more ideas about it?

Then I write other ideas about your homework, to does a good action today with you.

Formal discussion
To be extremely polite with your family.

Regards.
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  #13  
Old January 08, 2011, 09:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by irmamar View Post
Oh, thank you everybody with your examples, they are very useful.

María José, I didn't know that casual words for 'gay'. Thank you.
That's just a complimentary sample, there are lots more.
Have a look here, if you feel like it:
http://answers.yahoo.com/question/in...6132800AAjVBcJ
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Old January 09, 2011, 12:51 AM
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Thank you, María José.

Pjt, these are a kind of labels I've made for myself in order to distinguish among the possible choices a speaker can make when speaking. In fact, I wanted to distinguish between a language for everyday situations and trivial conversations. I thought that my examples could help.

For instance, I could use the form "pass away" when I'm going to offer somebody my condolences. I could say "die" after reading something about an accident at the newspapers. I could listen to "bite the dust" in a violent film. And all the three examples, in different contexts, have the same meaning of losing one's life. I didn't mean that all the people use the three different styles when talking, but most of them are able of understand them in different situations.
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Old January 09, 2011, 03:10 AM
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On a lighter note, here is a famous sketch which gives a list of euphemistic expressions for something dead.

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Old January 09, 2011, 04:58 AM
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Pobrecito, no le dejan descansar.
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Old January 09, 2011, 07:45 AM
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I've been following this thread with some interest, because I see that the bottom line is that there are certain idiomatic sayings and euphemistic phrases that can create difficulties if you only study the grammar of a language, but don't know how it is actually spoken in day-to-day life.

Two questions for you, Irma:

First, I am having a difficult time truly distinguishing between what you mean by "everyday language" and "casual language". To me, they are the same, as opposed to formal language.... It looks to me like the "casual language" you're looking for is often the euphemistic phrase. Is that your intention?

Second, Have you gotten enough examples, or are you looking for more?
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Old January 09, 2011, 11:56 AM
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No, Lou Ann, I meant even rude words which can be put in this section. But don't worry, I have enough examples now.

Thank you everybody.
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