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Tagalog (Filipino native language)

 

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  #21  
Old September 08, 2009, 12:20 AM
gabrieldemanila gabrieldemanila is offline
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We have a lot of loan words from Spanish but the spelling has been changed slightly to match how we spell words in Tagalog. Also, some words have been corrupted slightly over the years.

Filipinos of long ago do not differentiate the O and U sounds that much and the same goes for the E and I sounds. So in some cases, the way a borrowed word is spelled reflects this switching of vowels.

Other ways how the spelling is changed is that hard C are changed to K. Same goes for QU. Soft C and Z are changed to S. CH is changed to TS. J is changed to H. Spanish H is dropped from the word altogether. IA is changed to YA. ÍA is changed to IYA. LL is changed to LY (so calle = kalye). Ñ is changed to NY except in Santo Niño (so baño = banyo). RR and R is considered the same and both are rolled the same amount. V is changed to B. F is changed to P. It may be a bit weird but it's pretty easy to remember the tagalog word for something if you know its Spanish equivalent.

Examples of loaned words, spelled in Tagalog:

Professions - Ex. artista, abogado, presidente, empleyado, kargador, bumbero, barbero, inhinyero, tsuper (chofer), kundoktor (condoctor), doktor.

Days - Lunes, martes, miyerkules, huwebes, biyernes, sabado (not domingo though)

Numbers when using it to tell time, speed limits, score tests and monetary amounts above 10 Pesos.

Kitchen and dining items - kutsara, tinidor, kutsilyo, plato, tasa, baso, mesa, silya.

Food - mansanas, ubas, kastanyas, asado, bistek, embutido, empanada, sibuyas, kalabasa, picadilyo, menudo, mantikilya, mantika, asukal (from azucar), paminta (from pimienta).

Vehicles - kotse, bus, bisikleta, tren, eroplano, barko.

Religious names and items - San Jose, Birhen, Santa Maria, Santo Niño, Santo Tomas, altar, krus, ostya, kampana, kampanilya.

And some other odd words - asul, berde, telon, asar, merienda, pasaporte, kalye, diretso, andar, maneho, pasado, pasada, parada, kama, kuryente, sala, kwarto, sobra, grabe, bintana, eskwela, kwaderno, lapis, papel (both as paper and as role), estudyante, tisa, examen, oso, lobo, elepante, kuneho, amo (master), iho, iha, madre, tiyo, tiya, etc.

Last edited by gabrieldemanila; September 08, 2009 at 12:24 AM.
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  #22  
Old September 08, 2009, 09:54 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gabrieldemanila View Post
We have a lot of loan words from Spanish but the spelling has been changed slightly to match how we spell words in Tagalog. Also, some words have been corrupted slightly over the years.

Filipinos of long ago do not differentiate the O and U sounds that much and the same goes for the E and I sounds. So in some cases, the way a borrowed word is spelled reflects this switching of vowels.

Other ways how the spelling is changed is that hard C are changed to K. Same goes for QU. Soft C and Z are changed to S. CH is changed to TS. J is changed to H. Spanish H is dropped from the word altogether. IA is changed to YA. ÍA is changed to IYA. LL is changed to LY (so calle = kalye). Ñ is changed to NY except in Santo Niño (so baño = banyo). RR and R is considered the same and both are rolled the same amount. V is changed to B. F is changed to P. It may be a bit weird but it's pretty easy to remember the tagalog word for something if you know its Spanish equivalent.

Examples of loaned words, spelled in Tagalog:

Professions - Ex. artista, abogado, presidente, empleyado, kargador, bumbero, barbero, inhinyero, tsuper (chofer), kundoktor (condoctor), doktor.

Days - Lunes, martes, miyerkules, huwebes, biyernes, sabado (not domingo though)

Numbers when using it to tell time, speed limits, score tests and monetary amounts above 10 Pesos.

Kitchen and dining items - kutsara, tinidor, kutsilyo, plato, tasa, baso, mesa, silya.

Food - mansanas, ubas, kastanyas, asado, bistek, embutido, empanada, sibuyas, kalabasa, picadilyo, menudo, mantikilya, mantika, asukal (from azucar), paminta (from pimienta).

Vehicles - kotse, bus, bisikleta, tren, eroplano, barko.

Religious names and items - San Jose, Birhen, Santa Maria, Santo Niño, Santo Tomas, altar, krus, ostya, kampana, kampanilya.

And some other odd words - asul, berde, telon, asar, merienda, pasaporte, kalye, diretso, andar, maneho, pasado, pasada, parada, kama, kuryente, sala, kwarto, sobra, grabe, bintana, eskwela, kwaderno, lapis, papel (both as paper and as role), estudyante, tisa, examen, oso, lobo, elepante, kuneho, amo (master), iho, iha, madre, tiyo, tiya, etc.



this will take time for me to read.
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  #23  
Old September 08, 2009, 10:04 AM
VivaEspana VivaEspana is offline
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Where can you find work that is not hard, jchen? LOL All kinds of work are all hard. Even the manager or the CEO works hard. LOL . Just kiddin'. It all amounts to attitude in the workplace. I am teaching you cause you're young. I want to provide guidance. LOL

Last edited by VivaEspana; September 08, 2009 at 01:53 PM.
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  #24  
Old September 08, 2009, 06:19 PM
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Originally Posted by VivaEspana View Post
Where can you find work that is not hard, jchen? LOL All kinds of work are all hard. Even the manager or the CEO works hard. LOL . Just kiddin'. It all amounts to attitude in the workplace. I am teaching you cause you're young. I want to provide guidance. LOL
I know
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  #25  
Old October 29, 2009, 11:24 AM
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brute brute is offline
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A friend of mine has just registered on these forums. He is dkaress and needs to speak tagalog to live in the Philipines. He is new to computers and has not yet found this thread. Perhaps gabrieldemanila and VivaEspaña could point him in the right direction? Tagalog sounds an interesting language, but I'm afraid it will have to join the end of my "must do before I die" list. Mark Twain once remarked that "Life is too short to learn German". Well I am now quite good at German and French and am presently learning Spanish. I know some Dutch, Afrikaans, Swedish, Japanese, etc ........... But these are very much on the back burner at present!!!
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  #26  
Old November 02, 2009, 02:50 PM
VivaEspana VivaEspana is offline
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1-isa
2-dalawa
3-tatlo
4-apat
5-lima
6-anim
7-pito
8-walo
9-siyam
10 -sampu
11-labing isa
12-labing dalawa
13-labing tatlo
14-labing apat
15-labinglima
16-labing anim
17-labing pito
18-labing walo
19-labingsiyam
20-dalawampu
21-dalawamputisa
22-dalawamputdalawa
23-dalawamputtattlo


Money matters-
1-piso
2-dalawang piso
3-tatlong piso
4-apat na piso
5- limang piso


20- beinte pesos

30 trenta pesos

40 kuwarenta pesos

50 singkwenta pesos

60 sisenta pesos

70 sitenta pesos

80 otsenta pesos

90 nobenta pesos

100 siyento pesos or isang daang piso, etc...
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  #27  
Old November 02, 2009, 02:51 PM
VivaEspana VivaEspana is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brute View Post
A friend of mine has just registered on these forums. He is dkaress and needs to speak tagalog to live in the Philipines. He is new to computers and has not yet found this thread. Perhaps gabrieldemanila and VivaEspaña could point him in the right direction? Tagalog sounds an interesting language, but I'm afraid it will have to join the end of my "must do before I die" list. Mark Twain once remarked that "Life is too short to learn German". Well I am now quite good at German and French and am presently learning Spanish. I know some Dutch, Afrikaans, Swedish, Japanese, etc ........... But these are very much on the back burner at present!!!

Tell her to email me.
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  #28  
Old November 06, 2009, 03:09 AM
dkaress dkaress is offline
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fraid cant work out yet how to find the threads but will keep trying i am registered under penpals is this the correct site or should I be on another

I know most of the tagalog words you printed but dont know how to string together as a sentence, when see adjective interjections pronouns etc I just shut down goes over my head just want conversational tagalog so I can talk to my kids and so can reside in philippines I have 7daughters 4 in tarlac province 5,7, 10, 20. all I want is to stay with my family can you help cant learn from books need to hear sentence

Last edited by Rusty; November 06, 2009 at 10:02 PM. Reason: merged posts
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  #29  
Old April 12, 2013, 02:34 AM
Lejeandary Lejeandary is offline
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For the numbers,

In Tagalog/Filipino:

Isa (One)
Dalawa (Two)
Tatlo (Three)
Apat (Four)
Lima (Five)
Anim (Six)
Pito (Seven)
Walo (Eight)
Siyam (Nine)
Sampu (Ten)
Labing-isa (Eleven)
Labing-dalawa (Twelve)
....
Dalawampu (Twenty)
Tatlumpu (Thirty)
Apatnapu (Forty)
....
Isang daan (One Hundred)
Dalawang daan (Two Hundred)
....

Isang libo (One Thousand)
Dalawang libo (Tow Thousand)
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  #30  
Old September 24, 2013, 05:58 AM
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Destarte Destarte is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bmarquis124 View Post
Are the numbers the same as Spanish?
Hola! bmarquis Me llama Anabelle,

To answer your question no its not the same but generally most of Filipinos especially the older generation understand uno, dos, tres... diez, veinte, treinta etc... telling the time(a las doce , a las dos) it is widely use among Filipinos. In fact my grandparents and parents has Spanish subject in their classes until they were in college and they do understand spanish. This is not a surprise since Philippines was a colony of Spain for 300 years and spanish culture is a huge part of our history. We do definitely have lots of spanish influence in our culture from food, architecture to language etc.
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