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Christmas and New Year

NavidadNFP - Christmas


 Spanish  English 
 ¡Feliz Navidad!  Merry Christmas! 
 Navidad/DíaNM de Navidad  Christmas Day 
 navideño(a)ADJ  Christmas related 
 serieNF (de lucesNFP Christmas lights / string lights / string of lights 
 nacimientoNM/Belén[nm]  Nativity 
 árbolNM (de Navidad)/árbol de pascuaNF  Christmas tree 
 muñecoNM de nieveNF  snowman 
 esferaNF  (spherical) ornament 
 coronaNF  wreath 
 henoNM  hay 
 regaloNM  present 
 moñoNM  bow 
 botaNF  stocking 
 duendeNM  elf (Santa's little helpers) 
 Santa Clos / Papá Noel  Santa Claus 
 trineoNM  sledge / sled / sleigh 
 renoNM  reindeer 
 Rodolfo (el reno de la narizNF roja)  Rudolf (the red-nosed reindeer) 
 nochebuenaNF  poinsettia 
 NocheNF BuenaNF  Christmas Eve 
 piñataNF  piñata 
 muérdagoNM  mistletoe 
 brindisNM  toast 
 chimeneaNF  chimney 
 campanaNF  bell 
 cascabel NM  (jingle) bell /sleigh bell 
 velaNF  candle 
 bastónNM de carameloNM  candy cane 
 copoNM de nieveNF  snowflake 
 tarjetaNF de Navidad  Christmas card 
 juguetesNMP  toys 
 reyesNMP magosNMP (Melchor, Gaspar y Baltasar)  the (three) Wise Men (of/from the East) / the (Three) Kings (from the Orient) / the Magi (Caspar/Gaspar/Jaspar, Melchior, and Balthasar) 
 oroNM  gold 
 inciensoNM  frankincense 
 mirraNF  myrrh 
 escarchaNF (Mexico)  frost / tinsel / garland 
 espumillónNM (Spain)  garland 
 AñoNM NuevoNM  New Year 
 ¡Feliz Año Nuevo!  Happy New Year! 
 Año Viejo  Old Year 
 NocheNM Vieja  New Year's Eve 
 fuegosNMP artificiales  fireworks 
 propósitosNMP de año nuevo  New Year's resolutions 
 envolturaNF de regaloNM/papel[g]nm de regalo  gift wrap / wrapping paper 
 felicitaciónNF  greeting 
 villancicoNM  Christmas carol 
 panNM de frutasNFP/pan de pascua  fruitcake 
 galletaNF de jengibreNM  gingerbread 
 aguinaldoNM  Christmas bonus 


Last edited by AngelicaDeAlquezar; December 10, 2009 at 07:14 PM.
If you notice any errors or missing vocabulary, or you have a suggestion for this vocabulary topic page, please comment below.
   
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  #11  
Old November 30, 2009, 05:50 PM
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Thank you, Rusty. Additions and corrections are made.

"Escarcha" as tinsel can be a Mexican word only.
I find "cinta brillante" too general, but maybe it's used somewhere else to talk about a string of glittering strips or threads.

"Guirnalda" could be the more generalized word.


"Cinta brillante" would suggest to me a flat and smooth ribbon.
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  #12  
Old November 30, 2009, 06:06 PM
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Garland is the stuff that is attached in a long rope/string:
http://www.faqs.org/photo-dict/photo...as_garland.jpg

Tinsel is the stuff that falls off in individual pieces.......
http://images.ecommetrix.com/commerc...2009%20091.JPG

(Don't know how to make the thumbnail images......)
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  #13  
Old November 30, 2009, 06:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by laepelba View Post
Garland is the stuff that is attached in a long rope/string:
http://www.faqs.org/photo-dict/photo...as_garland.jpg

Tinsel is the stuff that falls off in individual pieces.......
http://images.ecommetrix.com/commerc...2009%20091.JPG

(Don't know how to make the thumbnail images......)
The first one is a guirnalda and the second is escarcha.

árbol de pascua = christmas tree

pan de pascua =mix of fruit cake and panettone

... in Chile.

Last edited by chileno; November 30, 2009 at 09:34 PM. Reason: change bread for cake...
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  #14  
Old November 30, 2009, 07:44 PM
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Changes proposed by Lou Ann and Hernán are made.


I've heard "pan de pascua" (or "pan de frutas") as "fruitcake"... is it a Mexicanism or is it normally called so in English-speaking countries?
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  #15  
Old November 30, 2009, 09:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AngelicaDeAlquezar View Post
Changes proposed by Lou Ann and Hernán are made.


I've heard "pan de pascua" (or "pan de frutas") as "fruitcake"... is it a Mexicanism or is it normally called so in English-speaking countries?
Yes... I changed it.

La "clorita" se está poniendo pesada...

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  #16  
Old November 30, 2009, 09:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AngelicaDeAlquezar View Post
Changes proposed by Lou Ann and Hernán are made.


I've heard "pan de pascua" (or "pan de frutas") as "fruitcake"... is it a Mexicanism or is it normally called so in English-speaking countries?
Where you have gotten the ( Pan de pascua ). I mean in that store sells it, I have never heard about that bread in my life, I'd like give it a little bite.
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  #17  
Old November 30, 2009, 09:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CrOtALiTo View Post
Where you have gotten the ( Pan de pascua ). I mean in that store sells it, I have never heard about that bread in my life, I'd like give it a little bite.

Be careful what you wish for. Fruit cake has gotten a bad rap for a long time. Eventhough some chefs are trying to "bring it back", so to speak, it is still something that many people stay away from or re-gift it over and over again!

It has been alluded that Fruit cake can last for years and years....I don't know if that is true or not.

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  #18  
Old December 01, 2009, 12:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AngelicaDeAlquezar View Post
Thank you, Rusty. Additions and corrections are made.

"Escarcha" as tinsel can be a Mexican word only.
I find "cinta brillante" too general, but maybe it's used somewhere else to talk about a string of glittering strips or threads.

"Guirnalda" could be the more generalized word.


"Cinta brillante" would suggest to me a flat and smooth ribbon.
We call this "espumillón".
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  #19  
Old December 01, 2009, 02:08 AM
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Gingerbread girl
Sleighbells
Ornaments
Noisemakers
Carolers
Fireplace
Christmas crackers
Santa´s snack
NAtivity scene
Bulbs
Holly
Christmas bonus

Last edited by ROBINDESBOIS; December 01, 2009 at 03:11 AM.
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  #20  
Old December 01, 2009, 02:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by laepelba View Post
Hmmm... I'm not exactly sure what you are asking here. SORRY!!
There are various ways of forming noun phrases (NPs) in English. There's the simple noun (e.g. bell). There's adjective + NP (e.g. golden bell). There's NP + NP (e.g. sleigh bell).

The only context in which I know the phrase "jingle bell" is the song "Jingle bells", in which "jingle" is a verb used as an imperative. I'm not familiar with "jingle bell" as a noun phrase, and I'm trying to understand the construction. Is it just adopted from the song with a change from verb phrase (verb + subject) to noun phrase, or are you using jingle as an adjective or noun? (If you don't know then I may try asking a linguist).
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