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Le Dispararon

 

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  #1  
Old September 04, 2019, 08:02 PM
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Le Dispararon

They shot him twice
Le dispararon dos veces


They shot her twice
Le dispararon dos veces

Is Le used for both him and her in the above sentences? If so, why? What is the grammar rule?

Any and all input is appreciated.
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  #2  
Old September 04, 2019, 09:44 PM
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It's an indirect object, so the pronoun is "le" both for "ella" and "él". Only if it were a direct object there would be difference between "la" or "lo".
Yet, there is some "le"/"la" when there is "leísmo", but I don't know exactly when this pair is used.


Indirect objects should all be "le":

· Le dije a Juan que lo quiero mucho.
· Le dije a Laura que la quiero mucho.

. Le traje un regalo al niño.
· Le traje un regalo a la niña.

· A mi amigo le gusta el café.
· A mi amiga le gusta el café.

· Al jefe le molesta que lleguemos tarde.
· A la jefa le molesta que lleguemos tarde.
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Old September 05, 2019, 12:50 PM
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Thank you for the answer and the examples you wrote, Angelica. I think I'm going to have to review how to determine if it is a direct object or an indirect object AGAIN!!!

I know to use "Le" in the examples you gave, but only because that's the way I have heard them used in similar sentences in the past. I know them by sound and not by grammar rule.

As always, thank you for your input.
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Old September 05, 2019, 04:18 PM
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The direct object answers "quién" or "qué" gets the action of the verb:

- Hice pasteles. → --¿Qué hiciste? --Pasteles.
- ¿Compraste pan? → --¿Qué compraste? --Pan.
- Juan vio a* María. → --¿A* quién vio Juan? --A* María.
- Ayer vimos una película. →¿Qué vimos ayer? --Una película.
- Mis vecinos llevaron a* los niños a la escuela. → --¿A* quién llevaron mis vecinos a la escuela? --A* los niños.
- Mamá, Papá, ¿nos compraron dulces? → --¿Qué nos compraron? --Dulces.
*"Personal" a.


The indirect object answers the question "a quién" or "a qué":

- Le hice un pastel a Araceli. → --¿A quién le hice un pastel? --A Araceli.
- ¿Le hablaste a** Pedro? → --¿A** quién le hablaste? --A** Pedro.
- Alfonso me dijo que viniera. → --¿A quién le dijo Alfonso que viniera? --A mí.
- Les trajimos regalos a los niños. → --¿A** quiénes les trajimos regalos? --A** los niños.
- ¿Le arreglaste el freno al coche? → --¿A qué le arreglaste el freno? --Al coche.
- Los vecinos no les han puesto agua a las plantas. → --¿A qué no le han puesto agua los vecinos? --A las plantas.
**Not "personal" a.

I hope I didn't make it more confusing.
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Old September 05, 2019, 08:43 PM
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No, Angelica. The examples are NOT confusing. Thank you for taking the time to think them up and to write all of them.

I guess I just have to mentally say "a quién" when using the verb "disparar" and not just "quién."

I shouldn't tell on myself, but I struggle with direct and indirect objects to the point that I many times shy away from speaking to someone in the Usted form because I'm unclear if I should use "Lo," "La," or "Le" when needing to say "You" in the sentence. When speaking in the familiar form, I know I can just use "Te" and be correct. (Yes, I am familiar with "leísmo," so I'm sure to question why "Le" was used when I see it written.)

I'll eventually get it because when I hear or see "Lo," "La," or "Le" written, I pay special attention to it so I can imitate it when I speak; and more importantly, I know I can turn to this forum and get any further doubts cleared up.
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Old September 05, 2019, 09:00 PM
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Certainly! Ask anything you need. We'll do our best to help you.

Some verbs like "disparar" are tricky, but you shoot a projectile to someone; you don't really shoot someone from a gun.
Another confusing verb may be "hablar": you speak a language, but you don't speak someone.
Thinking like this might help you spot them more easily. And definitely, imitating is a great way to acquire the habit.
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Old September 05, 2019, 10:37 PM
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"You shoot a projectile to someone; you don't really shoot someone from a gun."

Bingo!!!! That's the key I needed to understand the true translation of "disparar." We think of it a little differently in English.

Thanks, Angelica. That clears it up.
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Old September 06, 2019, 01:35 PM
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Glad to be of help.
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Old September 07, 2019, 10:29 AM
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It's "le" instead of lo because if you said lo, it would be like you are shooting him as if he were a gun. Also yes, le can refer to both he and she.
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