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Old January 12, 2015, 08:48 AM
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Husband?

My linquaphone has husband as Marido. Online translations also have Esposo. Can anyone help on this please.
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Old January 12, 2015, 10:47 AM
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marido is husband and esposo is spouse (male)
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Old January 12, 2015, 08:50 PM
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Both marido and esposo mean husband.
Both can also mean spouse.

A husband is also a spouse, when you think about it.

There is also esposa, but that refers to the wife.
A wife is also called a mujer. This is the feminine equivalent of marido.

A wife is also a spouse. The feminine form of spouse is esposa.
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Old January 12, 2015, 10:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rusty View Post
Both marido and esposo mean husband.
Both can also mean spouse.

A husband is also a spouse, when you think about it.

There is also esposa, but that refers to the wife.
A wife is also called a mujer. This is the feminine equivalent of marido.

A wife is also a spouse. The feminine form of spouse is esposa.
Esposo an spouse have the same Latin root. Therefore esposo is to spouse
what marido is to husband.
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Old January 12, 2015, 11:50 PM
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I explained why dictionaries give 'husband' as a translation of marido and esposo, so as to add credence to the dictionaries the original poster has investigated instead of discrediting them.
Those words do mean husband and the dictionaries he consulted contain accurate information.

I'm also aware that esposo can be translated as spouse (and handcuff ), but the more common translation is husband.

I just checked nine online Spanish-English dictionaries for their translation of esposo and found that seven of them list husband as the first entry and give spouse as a second entry. So, a majority of the online dictionaries support my claim, which matches what the OP discovered.

These Spanish words have their roots in Latin, as you stated.

Marido comes from marītus - Latin for husband. (The feminine form marīta means wife.)
Esposo comes from spōnsus - Latin for groom/husband. (The feminine form spōnsa means bride/wife.)
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Old January 13, 2015, 07:03 AM
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Thanks for that rusty and poli. I didn't know there were 9 online dictionary's. The only 2 I have are http://translation.babylon.com/ and http://www.spanishdict.com/translation/. The latter has sound so you can here the pronunciation. Thanks a lot guys.
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Old January 13, 2015, 07:12 AM
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There are more than 9 online dictionaries. I looked at 9 to see how many agreed with the 'husband' translation you found for esposo.

If your wife is introducing you, her husband, to someone else where Spanish is spoken, she could say either:
Este es mi marido -or-
Este es mi esposo.

Both are translated as 'This is my husband' at translate.google.com.
When you think about it, who would say 'This is my spouse' during an introduction?
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Old January 13, 2015, 08:06 AM
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This of course is splitting hairs, but it's common to hear the terms man and wife , and it's the opposite in Spanish marido y mujer. The final words of a marriage ceremony have traditionally, prior to same-sex unions, have been, I now pronounce you man (or husband) and wife. They are now espoused. I believe there is a similar pronouncement is used in Spanish. Though these words are all synonymous, spouse correlates directly to esposos with the same Latin origin. Husband and wife are not latinate at all, and only correlate to marido y mujer in meaning and not etymological origin.
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