#21  
Old December 21, 2009, 03:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chileno View Post
So you dont hear the three I am pointing you at?

Edited:

I just realized that our D is not exactly as a TH in English...
The two "th"s you've highlighted aren't even the same as each other. One's voiced and the other isn't. But they're both fricatives, whereas d is a plosive.

http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modo_de_articulaci%C3%B3n
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  #22  
Old December 21, 2009, 06:41 PM
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Cool - thanks for that article. It will take me awhile to read it, but I will do so!
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  #23  
Old December 21, 2009, 07:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by María José View Post
You can also say: dejar a alguien a su libre albedrío. (let them do what they want)
Maria Jose

Good night.

The you wrote in the last post is the way correct to write it or it's another example of the that I wrote before.

Anyhow your post seem me very accurate, because literally it says at most the same of the I want to say before.

Really in the English there are a lot ways to say a only phrase.

And it's amazing.


Thanks.
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Last edited by CrOtALiTo; December 21, 2009 at 07:41 PM.
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  #24  
Old December 21, 2009, 07:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pjt33 View Post
The two "th"s you've highlighted aren't even the same as each other. One's voiced and the other isn't. But they're both fricatives, whereas d is a plosive.

http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modo_de_articulaci%C3%B3n
If you read the posts previous to the one you quoted, you will understand my point.

Thanks for the link.
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  #25  
Old December 24, 2009, 01:27 AM
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Estoy un poco confundido sobre esa forma

Dejar + a su albedrío

Dejo a tu albedrío si vemos al cine esa noche o la última noche
It´s up to you (I´m letting you decide) if we go to the movies tonight or tomorrow night.

Las personas de la jurado habrán de dejar / dejarán a sus albedríos si el ladrón irá a la prisión.
Muchas gracias
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  #26  
Old December 24, 2009, 04:02 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobjenkins View Post
Dejo a tu albedrío I leave to your judgement

Las personas de la jurado habrán de dejar / dejarán a sus albedríos si el ladrón irá a la prisión.
The jury will have to leave / will leave to their judgement ...
As I understand it, the 'a' here indicates an indirect object.
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  #27  
Old December 24, 2009, 11:51 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobjenkins View Post
Estoy un poco confundido sobre esa forma

Dejar + a su albedrío

*Dejo a tu albedrío si vemos vamos al cine esa esta noche o la última noche mañana (en la noche).
It´s up to you (I´m letting you decide) if we go to the movies tonight or tomorrow night.

**Las personas de la jurado habrán de dejar / dejarán a sus albedríos si el ladrón irá a la prisión.
Muchas gracias

*1) Albedrío" is a serious word, so it doesn't match a trivial decision like going to the movies.

2) But you can say "dejo a tu elección si vamos al cine hoy o mañana".

3) And it's either "ver una película" or "ir al cine". "Ver el cine" is to stay outside and watch the building.


** The justice example needs many corrections and an explanation of a tricky issue about "albedrío":

1) "Jurado" is a masculin.

2) All collective names in Spanish are conjugated in singular:
- La gente camina en la calle.
- La policía investiga un delito.
- La familia va de vacaciones
- El jurado delibera.

3) To exert one's will is "ejercer su albedrío". "Dejar al albedrío de alguien" implies "alguien" is exerting his/her will.

One can say "el juez deja al albedrío del jurado si el ladrón va a prisión" or "el jurado ejerce su albedrío al decidir si el ladrón va a prisión", however, the last sentence suggests some kind of whim from the jury, but in a legal context, it should be understood that they decided by following the law.
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  #28  
Old December 24, 2009, 04:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AngelicaDeAlquezar View Post
*1) Albedrío" is a serious word, so it doesn't match a trivial decision like going to the movies.

2) But you can say "dejo a tu elección si vamos al cine hoy o mañana".

3) And it's either "ver una película" or "ir al cine". "Ver el cine" is to stay outside and watch the building.


** The justice example needs many corrections and an explanation of a tricky issue about "albedrío":

1) "Jurado" is a masculin.

2) All collective names in Spanish are conjugated in singular:
- La gente camina en la calle.
- La policía investiga un delito.
- La familia va de vacaciones
- El jurado delibera.

3) To exert one's will is "ejercer su albedrío". "Dejar al albedrío de alguien" implies "alguien" is exerting his/her will.

One can say "el juez deja al albedrío del jurado si el ladrón va a prisión" or "el jurado ejerce su albedrío al decidir si el ladrón va a prisión", however, the last sentence suggests some kind of whim from the jury, but in a legal context, it should be understood that they decided by following the law.
¡Muchísimas gracias por el bueno consejo y explicación completo!
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