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I need an adjective for Almeria

 

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  #1  
Old June 30, 2017, 05:46 PM
Djard Djard is offline
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I need an adjective for Almeria

A native from Jerez in Andalucía may be called "un Jerezano," and from Madrid, "un Madrileño" or "una Madrileña." Would it be correct to call someone from Almeria, "un Almeriano" or "una Almeriana"?

If so, could we properly translate the English 'Almerian Echos' as "Ecos Almerianos"? I don't want to use "Ecos de Almeria."
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  #2  
Old June 30, 2017, 06:44 PM
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Yes, 'un,-a Almeriano,-a' or 'un,-a Almeriense' is used to name a native from Almería.
For the band, however, you would say "los Ecos de Almería", for that is their name.
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Old July 05, 2017, 06:58 PM
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Gracias. Eres muy amable.
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Old July 09, 2017, 02:41 PM
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It depends on the context. If you use almeriano you will be understood, but if you're writing for a formal audience you should probably use almeriense, because that's the correct demonym according to the DRAE. Or if you want to be obscure, you could use urcitano.

Spanish Wikipedia will normally list the demonym for any place which has a page.
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Old July 10, 2017, 08:09 AM
Djard Djard is offline
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Almeriense it is. Thanks.

I wanted to be neologistic as the term was intended for a creative music project. Not being a native Spaniard, I see that such an endeavor for me would only cause confusion.

Tomisimo, for example, to my ear also conveys the idea of being very Tom-like. Like Pianissimo is the Italian term used by all classic music composers to indicate an intensification of piano, meaning softly.

I have no idea how to construct a word to mean very Almerian, or very Andaluz.
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Old July 10, 2017, 08:59 AM
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You can add 'ón' to the end of some Spanish nouns to add intensity, but I'm not sure you should in the case of a demonym. I would just say 'muy' or 'verdadero', in addition to the noun, or add an adverbial phrase like 'de hecho' or 'de veras'.

'Soft' (suave, in Spanish) is an adjective and can be modified with an intensifier. A 'tome' (tomo, in Spanish), on the other hand, is a noun that should not be modified with an intensifier.
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Old July 10, 2017, 01:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Djard View Post
I have no idea how to construct a word to mean very Almerian, or very Andaluz.
If you want to make the word very andaluz, drop a few syllables and misspell it to force the implication of seseo. I think the more obscure demonym works better here: ursitá.
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Old July 17, 2017, 08:15 PM
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Muy Andalu'

Bue'... etá bien. Pue' habieno trabajao en Cay', prefieo pares' Andalu'. LOL!
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