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Old March 25, 2009, 03:53 AM
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Atropellar

This is a discussion thread for the Daily Spanish Word for March 25, 2009

atropellar (verb) — to run over, to knock down, to trample. Look up atropellar in the dictionary

Atropellaron un perro y no se detuvieron para ayudarle.
They ran over a dog and didn't stop to help it.
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  #2  
Old March 26, 2009, 08:57 AM
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¡Los niños atropelló los tulipanes en mi jardin ayer!
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Old March 26, 2009, 10:46 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fazor View Post
¡Los niños atropellaron los tulipanes en mi jardin ayer!
Atropellar means to run over but with a bump. Does that make sense?

Uno no atropella flores, pero las pisotea

Hurry, to the dictionary!
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Old March 26, 2009, 11:03 AM
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Um, so more like;
¿ 'Los niños pisotearon los tulipanes, y el toro antropelló la valla.' ?
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Old March 26, 2009, 11:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fazor View Post
Um, so more like;
¿ 'Los niños pisotearon los tulipanes, y el toro antropelló la valla.' ?

Fazor, I think you're trying to use it like run over.
I think the bull would probably have run into the fence but I don't think it would have run it over. "El toro atropelló al banderillero", "el coche atropelló el peatón". El toro se estrelló contra la valla.
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Old March 26, 2009, 01:57 PM
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The sentence ran over meaning Atropellar.

Then I can use him into of the English of the following way.

Today I ran over to a cat with my truck but I'm not guilty to do it.

Yesterday I run over to a cap because I never didn't see he cross the street .

I appreciate your help.
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Old March 26, 2009, 02:13 PM
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If that's the use, though, I don't see why you can't "antropellar" flowers. Kids run through (and in the process, crush) flowers all the time.
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Old March 26, 2009, 02:58 PM
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@Fazor: "atropellar" usually gives the idea of wheels...

When it comes about people, you can say figuratively "José me atropelló en el pasillo", but when it comes about plants, "pisotear" is a more common verb.

"Los niños atropellaron los tulipanes" would mean they ran over them with a bicycle or so.
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Old March 26, 2009, 02:59 PM
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Ah, okay. I accidently did that to a friend's neighbor's roses when I lost control of a moped once. :blush:
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Old March 26, 2009, 06:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AngelicaDeAlquezar View Post
@Fazor: "atropellar" usually gives the idea of wheels...

When it comes about people, you can say figuratively "José me atropelló en el pasillo", but when it comes about plants, "pisotear" is a more common verb.

"Los niños atropellaron los tulipanes" would mean they ran over them with a bicycle or so.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fazor View Post
Ah, okay. I accidently did that to a friend's neighbor's roses when I lost control of a moped once. :blush:
And still what Angelica said "ran them over with a bike or so" would still be pisotear even with wheels. Since they are so fragile.

Generally when anybody says atropellar would mean some body, human or animal, was ran over but with a vehicle of any kind, except, I guess, I ship. :-)

Would that clear a bit more the term?

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atropellar, to knock down, to run over, to trample

 

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