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Old May 14, 2010, 11:17 AM
Broken Spanish Broken Spanish is offline
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Man! / ¡Hombre!

I have been looking at my Spanish language book again and this time I came across some information about the word ¡Hombre!, used as a kind of intensifier to covey emotions like: Come on! You bet! It said it’s used mostly in Spain. Anyone know any more of its usage? Do Latin Americans use it at all?


In English we also use the word Man to intensify a sentence, when talking informally to friends or other young people. Its usage seems fairly new maybe from the 80s? My parents wouldn’t use it that’s for sure. My mum used to disapprove off the word and said to me ‘’I’m not a man, I’m a woman’’ if I used it with her.


Some examples of it in English: Yeah man! (Used when agreeing with someone), (Oh) Man! ( when expressing disappointment )


As I think its usage in England came from America. I’m wondering if the word Man used in this way came from the Spanish speaking population’s influence on the Americans, and that in turn; from TV etc had an effect on young English people.
Just a thought
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  #2  
Old May 14, 2010, 11:18 AM
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chileno chileno is offline
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Yes, it is/was used, but not well seen. At least in Chile, and in my time.
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Old May 14, 2010, 11:18 AM
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This is also used in Latin America. I've heard it used both ways (agreement, disappointment).
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Old May 14, 2010, 11:52 AM
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Yeah I agree with the others ones.
It's used in the population of the people here in Mexico and around of the world.

Those usages are very common in the ordinary life as my life as the life of another ones.
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Old May 14, 2010, 11:57 AM
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In Spain, we use it in at least two contexts:
Hombre, has venido ! To express surprise, you didn´t expect that person to turn up
Hombre, por supuesto que sí iré a la boda. To show reaffirmation.
And I guess you can use it in more contexts, but it´s like an intejection, and not at all rude! It´s fine. A bit colloquial I would say.

To express disagreement or exasperation we use the word Tío, not the equivalent to uncle, the other one.
Example:
Jo tío que has echo con mi coche. ( If sb hit it or damage it )
Esta tía siempre llega tarde.
Dejame en paz, tío.
I don´t know if the equivalent is guy in ENglish.

Last edited by AngelicaDeAlquezar; May 14, 2010 at 02:11 PM. Reason: Merged back-to-back posts
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Old May 14, 2010, 01:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ROBINDESBOIS View Post
To express disagreement or exasperation we use the word Tío, not the equivalent to uncle, the other one.
Example:
Jo tío que has echo con mi coche. ( If sb hit it or damage it )
Esta tía siempre llega tarde.
Dejame en paz, tío.
I don´t know if the equivalent is guy in ENglish.
Yes it's right.

In Spain only you use the word Tio instead of name to the person for his name.
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Old May 14, 2010, 03:42 PM
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In Argentina you can understand the word "hombre"(or tío) in this contexts, of course, but it would seem a little bit ridiculous to use it here, because it seems too formal to be an exlamation of its type; [sadly] we use more agressive/bad mannered expresions, or more relax ones. To learn Spanish, I think this seems perfect to give the language more naturally and not been too coloquial.
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Old May 17, 2010, 11:21 AM
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Thanks for your explanations, don’t worry I don’t really want to use colloquial language as a beginner yet, although I use it a lot in English so it would be nice to know some later.
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Old May 17, 2010, 12:27 PM
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I remember my father saying that it was in use when he was in school,
post-wwI; we used it the same way as kids in the 50s, and so it
continues in use to today.

As an exclamation or intensifier before 1918, I don't know, but i think
it's coincidentally a shared term English/Spanish rather than one resulting
from Spanish influence on English usage.

I'd be surprised if it couldn't be found somewhere in Shakespeare, at least;
might be as old as the English language...?
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Last edited by hermit; May 17, 2010 at 01:14 PM.
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Old May 17, 2010, 01:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ookami View Post
In Argentina you can understand the word "hombre"(or tío) in this contexts, of course, but it would seem a little bit ridiculous to use it here, because it seems too formal to be an exlamation of its type; [sadly] we use more agressive/bad mannered expresions, or more relax ones. To learn Spanish, I think this seems perfect to give the language more naturally and not been too coloquial.
It's your point.
The word Tio at least here in Mexico is some vulgar in term of education.
In Spain it's so normal name as here you name Hombre, chico, chavo, and for last Señor.

Have a good day.
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