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  #11  
Old September 09, 2009, 05:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ookami View Post
Thanks pjt33 but, is there another way to say that without saying twice the same word? it sounds ugly.
"That that" is the most natural way to say it. It's not really the same word, anyway: I'm pretty sure that when I say "that that" I pronounce the first one more like "thut".

If you really want a sentence which repeats a way, try this:
Tom, where Fred had had "had", had had "had had"; "had had" had had the teacher's approval.

Bob, no me di cuenta de que era un hilo zombí. Gracias por avisarme, y por los vínculos.
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  #12  
Old September 09, 2009, 07:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pjt33;50682
Bob, no me di cuenta de que era [B
un hilo zombí[/B] . Gracias por avisarme, y por los vínculos.
Me gusta esta expresión..

" Night of the Living Dead Thread" ..

Questions will be dead right or RIPped off... (Siento.., me coge la insomnia.. )
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Last edited by EmpanadaRica; September 11, 2009 at 10:38 AM.
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  #13  
Old September 09, 2009, 09:07 PM
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"El hilo espectral" (and a glummy wind pass by)

What hour is there Empa? GMT X?
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Please, don't hesitate to correct my English.
'Time is a sort of river of passing events, and strong is its current; no sooner is a thing brought to sight than it is swept by and another takes its place, and this too will be swept away.' M.A.
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  #14  
Old September 10, 2009, 02:11 AM
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Glummy?
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  #15  
Old September 10, 2009, 08:18 AM
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uh uh!, sorry, gloomy. (I learned it recently so I'm trying to fix it :P)
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Please, don't hesitate to correct my English.
'Time is a sort of river of passing events, and strong is its current; no sooner is a thing brought to sight than it is swept by and another takes its place, and this too will be swept away.' M.A.
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  #16  
Old September 10, 2009, 11:01 AM
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Pues tampoco estoy 100% seguro de lo que quieres decir con "gloomy wind". Gloomy puede ser oscuro, en tinieblas, o (de una persona) un poco deprimido.
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  #17  
Old September 10, 2009, 11:22 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pjt33 View Post
Pues tampoco estoy 100% seguro de lo que quieres decir con "gloomy wind". Gloomy puede ser oscuro, en tinieblas, o (de una persona) un poco deprimido.
it also means tenebroso...
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  #18  
Old September 10, 2009, 01:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pjt33 View Post
Pues tampoco estoy 100% seguro de lo que quieres decir con "gloomy wind". Gloomy puede ser oscuro, en tinieblas, o (de una persona) un poco deprimido.
¿Eso no significa el mismo que "tenebroso"?
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  #19  
Old September 12, 2009, 09:30 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pjt33 View Post
Pues tampoco estoy 100% seguro de lo que quieres decir con "gloomy wind". Gloomy puede ser oscuro, en tinieblas, o (de una persona) un poco deprimido.
Quote:
Originally Posted by chileno View Post
it also means tenebroso...
Quote:
Originally Posted by pjt33 View Post
¿Eso no significa el mismo que "tenebroso"?
No estoy seguro de cuál es tu duda...

Gloomy wind se traduciría como "viento tenebroso" o sea "oscuro" o algo que da miedo porque no se puede discernir...
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  #20  
Old September 12, 2009, 10:27 AM
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(I was a bilingual teacher for 23 years and a high school Spanish teacher for 7 years. Have been teaching Italian for 4 years now to adults. My home language is Spanish a proposito.)

This is a very interesting topic tal vez the topic that interests me the most. Of course there our differences in Latin American Spanish and the Spanish from Spain but then again you should here the way my relatives from Arkansas speak English. It's just a question of accents and a few words here in there. (The word for all this is dialects.) I speak Italian as well as Spanish. I go back and forth between Spanish and Italian and also French. So those little difference between Spanish from Spain and Latin American Spanish have very little meaning to me. Think about it. When I listen to Italian I understand it and it's another language. So even though my Spanish is Latin American Spanish how would I have trouble understanding Spanish from Spain if I can even understand Italian. Have watched many movies from Spain and listened to many tapes of Spanish speakers from Spain. It's like the difference between American English and English from England. Different but mostly the samething. In fact it's these differences that make Spanish as well as English interesting.

So if you're half-way fluent in Latin American Spanish you would have very little trouble understanding the Spanish from Spain and visa versa. A proposito. It's the Spanish from southern Spain that is more similar to Latin Spanish than the more main stream Spanish from Spain of Madrid.

Last edited by Villa; September 12, 2009 at 09:54 PM.
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