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  #21  
Old September 12, 2009, 10:46 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chileno View Post
No estoy seguro de cuál es tu duda...
Pues un viento puede ser frío o caluroso, fuerte o ligero, pero ¿"gloomy"? Lo que has descrito me parece más un "chill wind".
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  #22  
Old September 12, 2009, 11:21 AM
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What does glommy mean?
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  #23  
Old September 12, 2009, 11:25 AM
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Gloomy was already defined earlier in the thread.
oscuro (sombrío is another meaning)
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  #24  
Old September 12, 2009, 12:48 PM
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Rusty.

Your answer was very clear thank you.

Then this can be used in this phrase.

The night is too glommy that I don't find the light of my street.
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  #25  
Old September 12, 2009, 06:22 PM
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pjt33 and villa et al. in madrid i found it like london - most people were
very clear in their speech, and some spoke the variant/dialect of their
place of birth. i learned spanish in the dominican republic, so some of the regional differences in spain were confusing to my ear. 90% of the
conversations in madrid, aranjuez, and toledo were understood 'bien clarito'.

to the north american english ear, some of the uk regional variations are
unintelligible over the telephone; better in person.

hermit
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  #26  
Old September 12, 2009, 07:14 PM
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@pjt: ¿cómo dirías "un viento que da miedo (estremecedor)"? Chilling wind?
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  #27  
Old September 13, 2009, 08:42 AM
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A chill wind.
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  #28  
Old September 13, 2009, 08:48 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pjt33 View Post
Pues un viento puede ser frío o caluroso, fuerte o ligero, pero ¿"gloomy"? Lo que has descrito me parece más un "chill wind".
Si se quisiera decir estremecedor se diría, también se podría decir un viento lúgubre, pero en este caso es tenebroso. Y creo, a mi poco entender, que se entiende perfectamente en español lo que quiere decir.

Ahora que lo pienso, no estoy seguro si el mensaje original era traducir gloomy wind al español.

Quizás no se use de esa manera en inglés, por lo que te causa confusión. O simplemente yo estoy equivocado.
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  #29  
Old September 13, 2009, 09:33 AM
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Gracias, pjt.

@Hernán: creo que era al revés... a la hora de traducir la cualidad del viento, en inglés no resulta comprensible como "gloomy".
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  #30  
Old September 13, 2009, 10:28 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AngelicaDeAlquezar View Post
@pjt: ¿cómo dirías "un viento que da miedo (estremecedor)"? Chilling wind?
I like the word "wuthering" as in Emilie Bronte's Book "Wuthering Heights"

I live only a few miles from her home (Howarth) and from the house described in the book. Wuthering is a local dialect word still in occasional use.

Wild and windy. The word also conjures up the wetness and the darkness of this bleak exposed moorland area.
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