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Misconceptions when learning Spanish

 

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  #1  
Old October 05, 2009, 07:37 PM
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Misconceptions when learning Spanish

What were the some (funny) misconceptions you had when you were learning Spanish? (Or when you were learning English)

I thought azotea was zotea, as in "Me voy a subir a la zotea".

I also thought it was "no le hagas acaso", not "no le hagas caso". Probably because I had already learned the word "acaso".
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  #2  
Old October 05, 2009, 08:09 PM
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Even though I'm a native speaker, I've made quite a few mistakes (only these two come to my mind now):

· I always thought "tela adhesiva" was "tela de siva" (never asked what "siva" was though)

· And only until I was an adult I realized "H. Ayuntamiento" had a dot after the H, so I had always thought the word was "Hayuntamiento" instead of "Honorable Ayuntamiento).
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Old October 05, 2009, 08:17 PM
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Probablemente la diferencia entre caliente y calor es más cómico, hace tiempo estaba diciendo "estoy caliente"

También al empezar mirar fútbol español siempre oí casillas, y me pregunté porque el comentador hablaba de "post office boxes" durante el juego
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Old October 06, 2009, 02:24 AM
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Not sure about funny misconceptions, but I can think of some funny mistakes. I needed receipts for everything in Ecuador for auditing expenses, and I got it into my head that "receipt" is "receta", so I went around asking for recipes in every shop I visited.
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Old October 06, 2009, 10:17 AM
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One more that I had corrected also as an adult:

I always thought the expression "dar abasto", was "dar a vasto"... it didn't matter that the wrong one didn't make much sense.
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Old October 06, 2009, 01:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tomisimo View Post
What were the some (funny) misconceptions you had when you were learning Spanish? (Or when you were learning English)

I thought azotea was zotea, as in "Me voy a subir a la zotea".

I also thought it was "no le hagas acaso", not "no le hagas caso". Probably because I had already learned the word "acaso".
Here I will give you some example with the use of the word Acaso, caso.

I hope this can help you and well if you know something about theses words well just you can use them as a support.

Acaso tu le diste dinero a Juan.

El caso de la mujer perdida.


Gen fun.
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Old October 15, 2009, 12:01 PM
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Quote:
También al empezar mirar fútbol español siempre oí casillas, y me pregunté porque el comentador hablaba de "post office boxes" durante el juego

I don't understand that - the Spanish for 'post office box no.' is apartado and posting box is buzón.
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Old October 15, 2009, 12:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sancho Panther View Post
I don't understand that - the Spanish for 'post office box no.' is apartado and posting box is buzón.
Casilla postal = apartado postal = P.O. Box
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Old December 24, 2009, 07:29 AM
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I just discovered one for me.... I am definitely a person who uses "filler" words when talking (not so much when writing). I say, "ok" and "you know" and "let's see" and so on...

So I often hear Spanish-speakers saying the same thing as a filler word, and I always thought it was "haber", which really has made absolutely NO sense to me whatsoever. Hahaha!! I just realized that it's "a ver", as in "let's see". Exactly what I would say in English. NOW it makes sense! LOL!!!
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Old December 24, 2009, 11:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by laepelba View Post
I just discovered one for me.... I am definitely a person who uses "filler" words when talking (not so much when writing). I say, "ok" and "you know" and "let's see" and so on...

So I often hear Spanish-speakers saying the same thing as a filler word, and I always thought it was "haber", which really has made absolutely NO sense to me whatsoever. Hahaha!! I just realized that it's "a ver", as in "let's see". Exactly what I would say in English. NOW it makes sense! LOL!!!
right...

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