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"dar un beso"

 

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  #11  
Old June 11, 2009, 01:29 AM
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Agree with Angelica and Elaina.
The sentence itself is normal, and I would say it's affectionate.
If I'm phoning with my wife, I can tell her "dale un beso al bebé", meaning to give my cutie baby a kiss.
The usage here is "bad/malo/mean" because, as stayed, they don't like each other.
So, instead of saying "saluda a Juan de mi parte"/"give him my regards", wich is mean enough for a person you don't like, you're meaner and you say "to give a kiss", so you're really bad, not for the sentence itself, but for the devilish intentions

But the sentence it's rather normal, spanish from Spain usage.
Saludos
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  #12  
Old June 15, 2009, 03:34 PM
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Thanks to everyone for the replies. Yes, as I stated in the beginning, I know it wasn't a genuine "kiss" or regards. It seems that Nicaragua would be the same as the Spain usage.

I guess we do it somewhat in English, but using a rather normal phrase or sentence, only the person that knows the relationship between the people would understand it as genuine regards or as an insult. Is that correct? And is that very common in Spanish to use a normal sentence for insults or just generally mean statements to someone you don't like?
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  #13  
Old June 15, 2009, 03:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NiCACHiCA View Post
Thanks to everyone for the replies. Yes, as I stated in the beginning, I know it wasn't a genuine "kiss" or regards. It seems that Nicaragua would be the same as the Spain usage.

I guess we do it somewhat in English, but using a rather normal phrase or sentence, only the person that knows the relationship between the people would understand it as genuine regards or as an insult. Is that correct? And is that very common in Spanish to use a normal sentence for insults or just generally mean statements to someone you don't like?
Exactly, you have gave in the nail, when an group to person or only two person knows the relationship between them, it does not important give a salute or kiss of course for telephone, but if you know to the person who you will give the salute as a kiss therefore I don't see the bad in it.

For example if you have a friend in other place and you phone him and when you going to tell him good bye, you can do the change for the phrase I send you a kiss or a cuddle, but it does not mean that you have something in relation with him.

I hope you can understand me.
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Old June 16, 2009, 02:19 AM
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Yes Nicachica
For example the following "normal" sentences will be directly as evil understand, unless you explain it (are stereotypes/clichés, but...)
"Mi suegra es un encanto"/"Me lelvo muy bien con mi suegra" (Mi mother-in-law is wonderfull/I'm in very good terms with her
"los niños del vecino son muy simpáticos" (the neighbor' kids are very nice)
"Mi jefe me saluda muy amablemente por las mañana" (My boss greets me nicely everday)

saludos
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  #15  
Old June 16, 2009, 09:14 AM
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If I remember correctly, I think simply saying "tu madre" is considered bad as well, in certain contexts??

I guess my question now is, when you say those things are taken as evil, is it truly evil? I think of evil as a very strong word. (saying you wished someone would die or something along those lines). But in the sentences you used, it sounds more like sarcasm, at least for the U.S. For example, "My mother-in-law is wonderful" in a sarcastic tone is a "light-hearted" way to say you and your mother-in-law don't get along well with each other. But in spanish, it implies a real insult towards your m-i-l!?
That brings up a good point. Many North Americans use ALOT of sarcasm when they speak. And it's usually not seen as evil. It's just a lighter way of saying what you really think. If those sentences are seen as insults in Hispanic Countries, it would be a good note for all North Americans. Since we constantly use sarcasm without thinking about it.
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Old June 16, 2009, 09:37 AM
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"Tu madre" at least in Mexico, usually implies a very offensive insult of course.

Although I think sarcasm is universal, its usage about mothers in law depends on individual sensibility and on how the "suegra" fits into the stereotype that they are very meddlesome, rude, gossipy, etc.

Still, sarcasm (for all kinds of topics) can often be charged with a lot more virulence than plain insults.
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Old June 16, 2009, 12:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AngelicaDeAlquezar View Post
"Tu madre" at least in Mexico, usually implies a very offensive insult of course.

Although I think sarcasm is universal, its usage about mothers in law depends on individual sensibility and on how the "suegra" fits into the stereotype that they are very meddlesome, rude, gossipy, etc.

Still, sarcasm (for all kinds of topics) can often be charged with a lot more virulence than plain insults.
Yes, I agree with you.

Thinking about the kiss, maybe you can hear something like this:

Me dio un beso que, bueno, parecía el beso de Judas.
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  #18  
Old June 17, 2009, 01:42 AM
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When I sayed evil intentions, it was only sayin it was no good.
But the sentences I provided are more sacarms than evil.
True evil sentences comes with rage inside, this sentences are only "a little of evil"/sarcasm. We use a lot this kind of sentences, und when there can be a misunderstanding we try to emphasize the misunderstanding.


---
Saying "tu madre" is a unpolite say to answer "same-to-you" when somebody insults you, so, as Angelica said, usually implies a very offensive insult.
It's like:
-our are a son-of-a-b****
-¡Tu madre! (same as your mother)


saludos
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