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Old June 07, 2017, 12:06 AM
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Términos de Clima

Estoy terminando de aprender algunos términos de clima, pero todavía me quedo con dudas acerca de cuáles de los siguientes son correctos y usados más en el habla cotidiana. Voy a memorizar uno de cada uno y luego seguir adelante con otros términos.

a rainy day
un día lluvioso
un día de lluvia


a snowy day
un día nevoso
un día nevado
un día de nieve


a foggy day
un día brumoso
un día neblinoso
un día nubuloso
un día de niebla


a warm day
un día caluroso
un día cálido
un día templado


a windy day
un día ventoso
un día de viento


Gracias de antemano, y como siempre, no duden en hacer sugerencías y corregir mis errores en español.
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Old June 07, 2017, 05:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobbert View Post

a rainy day
un día lluvioso
un día de lluvia


a snowy day
un día nevoso
un día nevado
un día de nieve


a foggy day
un día brumoso
un día neblinoso
un día nebuloso
un día de niebla


a warm day
un día caluroso
un día cálido
un día templado


a windy day
un día ventoso
un día de viento

un día lluvioso ---> describes the weather most of the day
un día de lluvia ---> the same, but it also describes a journey that may be affected by rains or lost as a working day: "la obra se retrasó este mes porque hubo 7 días de lluvia" meaning "se perdieron 7 días por lluvia".

un día nevoso
un día nevado
un día de nieve

I can't tell about use because the last day it snowed plenty here was in 2007 (the previous snowy day was in 1918 ) so we have only "días con aguanieve" meaning it was snow when it was five thousand feet above but it arrived partially melted or it melted instantly when it made contact with the ground.

I prefer nivoso to nevoso, but that characterizes the season and not the day, or it describes a day with unmistakeable signs of coming snow. Nevado are things snow falls over.

un día brumoso ---> right, used most to describe when the horizon -especially in shores- dissolves and you can't tell air from ground
un día neblinoso ---> right, used most to describe low fog, when you can perceive the sun shining above it, or patchy fog, the one that makes driving very dangerous as you go from a visibility of 1 mile to a hundred feet in a few seconds.
un día nebuloso ---> correct but confuse, as the word is used figuratively in many different situations. In many countries -like mine- it also means "shady" as in "shady character", though used to describe circumstances and things, and seldom to describe people.
un día de niebla --->the same as with un día de lluvia applies.


un día caluroso ---> a hot day, not a warm one
un día cálido ---> can be used, especially the the day is warm, verging hot; cálido is used to describe the season.
un día templado ---> a warm day, in the northerly fashion; Spanish speakers from the tropics may consider them cold days (and templado is not part of their vocabulary regarding weather, but, for instance, lukewarm water)

un día ventoso
un día de viento
the same about lluvia applies.

Consider that

un día con viento
un día con lluvia
un día con niebla/neblina
un día con nieve

are very common descriptions when those conditions are present during just part of the day.
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Old June 07, 2017, 11:22 AM
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Alec,
In English aguanieve is sleet.
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Old June 07, 2017, 01:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by poli View Post
Alec,
In English aguanieve is sleet.
I looked it up in the dictionary and it has a wider definition of what I know as aguanieve, that is made of a mix of partially melted snow flakes with cold rain drops.

But sleet also gives a name to something I don't know how it's called in Spanish but I have to suffer almost every winter: nasty drizzle that barely wets the ground (garúa) but frozen because of the low temperatures. The wind pushes it merciless onto one's face, which will become eczema-like. To that, I say and I add .

This talk makes me because Winter is about to start and night frosts are increasingly closer.
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Old June 07, 2017, 09:11 PM
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I was lucky when I went to Buenos Aires several years ago, it was in July and it was sunny and cool. Aguanieve is what the meteorólogos use for sleet on Univisión which can happen from November through March. It's awful, but it's not as bad a freezing rain (lluvia helada I think) is truly dangerous.
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Last edited by poli; June 07, 2017 at 09:19 PM.
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Old June 07, 2017, 09:18 PM
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Gracias, aleCcowaN. Seguro que todos esos detalles que te tomaste el tiempo para escribir me serán de mucha ayuda. Ahora mi tarea es aprenderlos.
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Old June 08, 2017, 10:07 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by poli View Post
I was lucky when I went to Buenos Aires several years ago, it was in July and it was sunny and cool. Aguanieve is what the meteorólogos use for sleet on Univisión which can happen from November through March. It's awful, but it's not as bad a freezing rain (lluvia helada I think) is truly dangerous.
Second freezing rain, alongside its cousin black ice; a very thin layer of ice that is so transparent on paved surfaces that most people don't notice the difference in appearance until it is too late. We say "black ice" because it makes asphalt pavement look as if it is wet rather than covered in ice.
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Old June 08, 2017, 10:22 AM
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"aire" is another good translation for "wind" (in addition to viento).

a windy day = un día con mucho aire
It was really windy. = Estaba haciendo mucho aire.
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Old June 08, 2017, 11:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by poli View Post
I was lucky when I went to Buenos Aires several years ago, it was in July and it was sunny and cool. Aguanieve is what the meteorólogos use for sleet on Univisión which can happen from November through March. It's awful, but it's not as bad a freezing rain (lluvia helada I think) is truly dangerous.
Quote:
Originally Posted by wrholt View Post
Second freezing rain, alongside its cousin black ice; a very thin layer of ice that is so transparent on paved surfaces that most people don't notice the difference in appearance until it is too late. We say "black ice" because it makes asphalt pavement look as if it is wet rather than covered in ice.
Freezing rain it is, then. (My bald patch hates that! ... Yes, I know, thousands of people had asked me why I didn't purchase a cap, but I thrive in cold weather)

I'd like to ask the English term for some kind of snow fall the French call something like "gresail" -I can't find the word and I don't know how it's spelt-. It falls with pretty high temperatures, about 8 or 10°C (some 45 to 50°F) and it consists of some ridiculously large snow flakes made mostly of air (they're like fluffy graupel), which fall very slowly and break the moment they touch the ground -or melt over you-.
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Old June 08, 2017, 11:43 AM
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I know exactly what gresail is once you described it. The word I know for it is wet snow with no accumulations. Freezing rain is sometimes called glaze because it covers everything, even tree branches with ice which looks like glass. It is beautiful when the sun shines on it, but is can be deadly.
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