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Learning Italian if you already speak Spanish

 

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  #1  
Old July 02, 2012, 11:02 AM
johnscarbi johnscarbi is offline
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Learning Italian if you already speak Spanish

What are some techniques to learn Italian if you already speak Spanish?

Last edited by AngelicaDeAlquezar; July 03, 2012 at 02:33 PM. Reason: Added language prefix
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  #2  
Old July 05, 2012, 02:56 PM
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I don't know any 'techniques', but if you level of Spanish is good or very good, learning Italian is a piece of cake...

I.e., I never studied Italian in a formal manner, yet I understand it rather well, and can speak it...
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Old August 08, 2012, 04:43 PM
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No estoy muy seguro de lo que estoy hablando porque no tengo mucha experiencia con italiano, pero si las dos lenguas son parecidas entonces ustedes ya sabe gran cosa del vocabulario y de la gramática. Creo que usted puedes evitar las clases básicas e ir directamente para la conversación, ver películas y otras actividades menos aburridas. Nuevas palabras y fluencia van entrar en su cabeza naturalmente.

Ah. Creo que también será útil comprar un libro de falsos amigos (italiano x español).

Last edited by Cavera; August 08, 2012 at 04:46 PM.
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Old August 09, 2012, 12:28 PM
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Recently, I tried to watch tv show in Italian and I should admit that I could understand half of it. Even I've never studied Italian.
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Old August 25, 2012, 07:03 AM
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  • Quote:
    Originally Posted by Cavera View Post
    Ah. Creo que también será útil comprar un libro de falsos amigos (italiano x español).
Di vitale importanza!
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Old August 25, 2012, 01:11 PM
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Certainly!
Burro = butter (Italian)
Burro = donkey (Spanish)
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Old August 25, 2012, 02:22 PM
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Las 'dobles consonantes' saber pronunciar exactamente, si no:
casa = house
cassa = box
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Old November 02, 2012, 10:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnscarbi View Post
What are some techniques to learn Italian if you already speak Spanish?
Hola/Ciao John. I am in my 7th year of teaching Italian to adults. I was a high school Spanish teacher for over 30 years. Most of my Italian students now are Spanish speakers and they learn Italian rapido. Spanish and Italian have the same vowel sounds. Italian speakers roll their "Rs" like in Spanish. Italian gn=Spanish ñ. Spanish and Italian letters t and d are pronounced the same.
Ti amo=Te amo. So when it's te in Spanish it is ti in Italian. When it is me in Spanish it is mi in Italian. Me gusta= Mi piace. otro=altro
70+% of Spanish is the same as Italian. You only have to learn the words that are different which are much fewer than going from English to Italian.

In many cases the Italian and Spanish words for something are very similar. In fact there are some simple rules for converting one to the other which work in many cases:
  • Almost all words in Italian end in a vowel, whereas many Spanish words do not. Compare giardino/jardín, partire/partir, migliore/mejor.
  • Italian 'o' or 'uo' often becomes 'ue' in Spanish when the syllable is stressed. E.g. morto/muerto, posto/puesto.
  • Italian 'e' often becomes 'ie' in Spanish when the syllable is stressed. E.g. concerto/concierto, tempo/tiempo.
  • Italian 'f' often becomes 'h' in Spanish when at the start of a word. E.g. fumo/humo, figlio/hijo.
  • Italian voiceless consonants 'c' and 't' often become voiced ('g' and 'd' respectively) in Spanish. E.g. amico/amigo, colpo/golpe, pietra/piedra, potere/poder.
  • Italian 'sc', 'sf', 'sp' and 'st' often become 'esc, 'esf', 'esp' and 'est' in Spanish, when at the start of a word. E.g. scrivere/escribir, sforzo/esfuerzo, speciale/especial, studente/estudiante.
  • The Italian suffixes '-tà' '-tù' and '-zione' become '-dad', '-tud' and '-ción' in Spanish. E.g. università/universidad, virtù/virtud, informazione/información.
Armed with this knowledge, you can easily learn the following pairs, which involve the 'o' to 'ue' rule: l'accordo/el acuerdo, il collo/el cuello, il conto/la cuenta, la corda/la cuerda, il corno/el cuerno, il corpo/el cuerpo, il fuoco/el fuego, il mobile/el mueble, la mostra/la muestra, la noce/la nuez, la porta/la puerta, il porto/el puerto, la risposta/la respuesta, il racconto/el cuento, l'ospite/el huésped, l'osso/el hueso, lo sconto/el discuento, il posto/el puesto, l'uovo/el huevo, il volo/el vuelo, buono/bueno, forte/fuerte, morto/muerto, nostro/nuestro, nuovo/nuevo, fuori/fuera, dopo/después.
And these ones, which involve the 'e' to 'ie' rule:
il cervo/el ciervo, il concerto/el concierto, il dente/el diente, la febbre/la fiebre, la festa/la fiesta, il governo/el gobierno, l'inverno/el invierno, la nebbia/la niebla, la pelle/la piel, il tempo/el tiempo, il vento/el viento, mentre/mientras, bene/bien, aperto/abierto, sempre/siempre, vecchio/viejo.
And these ones, which involve the initial 'f' rule:
la farina/la harina, la fata/el hada, il fegato/el hígado, il ferro/el hierro, il fico/el higo, il figlio/el hijo, il filo/el hilo, la foglia/la hoja, il fondo/el hondo, la formica/la hormiga, il forno/el horno, il fumo/el humo, fare/hacer, ferire/herir.
This is something I wrote a few years ago:

Oh mio Dio! Oh Dios mio! Come sta? Como esta? Come va? Como va? Bene. Bien. Benvenuto. Bienvenido.
La mia casa è grande. La mia casa es grande. Grande=grande
This is without a double my favorite subject. Mi diverto! Me divierto!

Spanish and Italian compared:

1. GN=exactly Spanish Ñ as in Español. This Ñ sound of the Spanish
language is probably the sound that most represents the Spanish language and Italian has this sound with GN.
The Italian word montagna sounds just like the Spanish word montaña meaning mountain.

2.Probablemente even more importante is the fact that Italian and Spanish both have the exact same vowel sounds.
a e i o u - ah eh e oh oo
French does not have these same Italian and Spanish vowel sounds.

3. Also importante as the GN=Ñ Italian Spanish connection is the fact that the Italian letters T and D
are pronounced the same in both languages.

5. Then in Italian and Spanish you roll your letter R the same. Roma, arriverderci, guerra, Roberto
This rolling of the letter R and all the above examples make Italian and Spanish pronunciation much closer than French
and Italian although both Italian and Spanish are related to French and all the other Latin based languages.

6. Most of the rest of the Italian consonants go along with Spanish consonants sounds.
So a Spanish speaker has little to learn compared to an English speaker learning Italian.

Qui/aqui/here is just a small lista of Italian phrases that any Spanish speaker can recognize.

A proposito.
Vale la pena.
Non vale la pena.
la casa
una casa
una casa grande
la casa grande
la mano
Quanto le devo?
Ti amo.
Ti amo tanto.
Ti amo tanto tesoro.
la libreria
la biblioteca
il supermercato
Dammi un bacio, tesoro.
arte
musica
la terra
nord
Atlantico
Pacifico
Artico
Antartico
disponibile
secondo
telefono
ora
caffe
tempo
sempre
va
agente
animale
attenzione
attore
azione
capitale
caso
centrale
centro
cereale
chitara
colore
differente
festa
gererale
generoso
importante
interessante
locale
materiale
nazione
necesssario
originale
personale
possibile
probabile
radio
regolare
ristorante
semplice
simile
teatro
totale

Could go on all day with this list of words that are similar in Italian and Spanish.

My God even an English only speaker can learn Italian now just imagine how
easy it is for a Spanish speaker to learn Italian.

Last edited by Rusty; November 03, 2012 at 12:39 AM. Reason: merged back-to-back posts
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  #9  
Old November 02, 2012, 11:12 PM
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JPablo JPablo is offline
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Wow, you said it.

Just one thing/correction, on this example,
La mia casa è grande. La mia casa es grande.

In Spanish it would be "Mi casa es grande"... ¿Qué casa es grande? -La mía.
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  #10  
Old March 27, 2013, 12:25 PM
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Villa.... Your post is golden. Thanks for the in-depth analysis.
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