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  #21  
Old August 30, 2013, 06:34 AM
Liquinn3 Liquinn3 is offline
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I guess Spanish is hard and easy at the same time. Does English or Spanish have more vocabulary?
   
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  #22  
Old August 30, 2013, 07:14 AM
tetsuo tetsuo is offline
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No, I was serious about this. They are really good techniques that should be used in school, but instead we are - or better say the teachers - use boring, old-fashioned techniques. In fact, I think we should learn reading the way we do until 5th or 6th grade, from this grade we should learn fast reading techniques. Since I discovered those techniques I am really angry about my teachers (fast reading isn't that new and was already discovered with good techniques when I attended school). How much I have missed and how many things I could easily understand now. In fact I doubled my speed and understand more of nearly every text I am reading. Even English articles are easier now. But as always it depends on the topic and words used. If this about a scientific topic, I will read slow. If this is a novel, I will read as fast as I can with a higher comprehention.
  #23  
Old August 30, 2013, 02:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Liquinn3 View Post
I guess Spanish is hard and easy at the same time. Does English or Spanish have more vocabulary?
It doesn't particularly address Spanish, because that's the thing with every language.
English has definitely a bigger vocabulary.

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Originally Posted by tetsuo View Post
@Premium
No, I was serious about this. They are really good techniques that should be used in school, but instead we are - or better say the teachers - use boring, old-fashioned techniques. In fact, I think we should learn reading the way we do until 5th or 6th grade, from this grade we should learn fast reading techniques. Since I discovered those techniques I am really angry about my teachers (fast reading isn't that new and was already discovered with good techniques when I attended school). How much I have missed and how many things I could easily understand now. In fact I doubled my speed and understand more of nearly every text I am reading. Even English articles are easier now. But as always it depends on the topic and words used. If this about a scientific topic, I will read slow. If this is a novel, I will read as fast as I can with a higher comprehention.
I don't know any other school system than the one in Austria.
Pretty much nobody learns a language if you only have 2 hours English or any other foreign language per week in school. Compared to other countries Germany and Austria actually do well. It would even be better if movies aren't dubbed like in the Netherlands or Sweden, where the percentage of English-speakers are considerably higher.
I don't really think any technique would change that when you only have 2 hours per week.
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  #24  
Old August 30, 2013, 03:51 PM
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Yes I agree with Premium. 2h a week in a classroom setting is not going to make you fluent. Another factor is that the teachers are not native speakers either. I do remember my English teacher especially, he knew every grammar rule under the sun but barely spoke himself so we didnt speak English in class...
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  #25  
Old August 31, 2013, 05:53 AM
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I had three English teachers and one of them was from Florida.
Each of them taught it differently, one of my teacher preferred only to learn new words and completely neglect grammar. My other teacher was Austrian but spoke only English in class.
To teach your native language you really need to study it.
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  #26  
Old August 31, 2013, 06:53 AM
tetsuo tetsuo is offline
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School is in my opinion a demotivating place and now even more than during my time.
All techniques need to acknowledged. Then anything will be faster. Except for the techniques used at school. Those are lame, boring, demotivating, senseless. I'd never write and speak English they way I do now, if didn't read books in English, fortunately I had the possibilities to do many things not many people have the chance to do so.
  #27  
Old August 31, 2013, 03:58 PM
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School is in my opinion a demotivating place and now even more than during my time. Those are lame, boring, demotivating, senseless.
Why do you blame the school and not the teacher? It's the teachers job to make the class as productive and amusing as possible.
You can have a Harvard alumnus but the class won't make much of it if he's like a sleeping pill.
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Last edited by Premium; August 31, 2013 at 04:00 PM.
  #28  
Old August 31, 2013, 04:33 PM
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Because we still use the wrong and unamusing learning techniques. And as far as I know it's not a teacher's decision to change them. It would be more fun, if we chose the right techniques but we are still using the same old boring unamusing ones.
  #29  
Old October 27, 2013, 04:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Liquinn3 View Post
I guess Spanish is hard and easy at the same time. Does English or Spanish have more vocabulary?
Hola Liquinn. Veo que nadie has answered your question.

Both Spanish and English are continuing to add words — English primarily through the addition of technology-related words and words related to popular culture, while Spanish expands primarily through the adoption of English words.It is generally stated (although authorities differ) that English has around 250,000 to 300,000 words when obsolete words (which still exist in some unabridged dictionaries) aren't counted. There is one count that puts the English vocabulary at about 1 million words — but that count presumably includes words such as Latin species names, prefixed and suffixed words, jargon, foreign words of extremely limited English use, technical acronyms and the like, making the count as much of a gimmick as anything else.
All that said, it is probably fair to say that English has about twice as many words as does Spanish. Large college-level English dictionaries typically include around 200,000 words. Comparable Spanish dictionaries, on the other hand, typically have around 100,000 words. Of course, many of those words are seldom used. Estimates I have seen indicate that Americans typically have a speaking vocabulary of around 20,000 words, although in a typical day they actually use far fewer. I've been unable to find reliable estimates on the everyday vocabulary of Spanish speakers, but I'd guess that the number of words used by educated speakers in a typical day would be about the same in either language. In either language, it is possible to communicate reasonably well with fewer than 1,000 words.
One reason that English has a larger vocabulary is that it is a language with Germanic origins but a tremendous Latin influence, an influence so great that sometimes written English seems more like French and even Spanish than it does like Danish, another Germanic language. For example any word that ends in "tor" is the same in Spanish. Example: "actor", The merging of two streams of language into English is one reason why we have both the words "late" and "tardy," words often interchangeable, while Spanish (at least as an adverb) has only tarde. The most similar influence that happened to Spanish was an infusion of Arabic vocabulary, but the influence of Arabic on Spanish isn't close to the influence of Latin on English. English vocabulary from Latin is as high as 60%. (That's why I like to say that English is a semi-Latin language or at least English vocabulary is semi-latino.)

The fewer number of words in Spanish, however, doesn't mean that it can't be just as expressive as English; sometimes it is more so. One feature that Spanish has when compared to English is a flexible word order. Thus the distinction that is made in English between "dark night" and "gloomy night" might be made in Spanish by saying noche oscura and oscura noche, respectively. Spanish also has two verbs that are the rough equivalent of the English "to be," and the choice of verb can change the meaning (as perceived by English speakers) of other words in the sentence. Thus estoy enferma ("I am sick") is not the same as soy enferma ("I am sickly"). Spanish also has verb forms, including a much-used subjunctive mood, that can provide nuances of meaning sometimes absent in English. Finally, Spanish speakers frequently use suffixes to provide shades of meaning.
All living languages seem to have the ability to express what needs expressing; where a word doesn't exist, speakers find a way to come up with one — whether by coining one, adapting an older word to a new use or importing one from another language. That's no less true of Spanish than of English, so Spanish's smaller vocabulary shouldn't be seen as a sign of inferiority. Al contrario, amigo.

Para resumir, amigo:

El menor número de palabras en español, no significa que no puede ser tan expresivo como inglés, porque a veces, el español es más expresivo que el inglés.

Last edited by Villa; October 27, 2013 at 04:45 PM.
  #30  
Old October 27, 2013, 05:16 PM
Liquinn3 Liquinn3 is offline
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Muchas gracias por tu opinión, Villa.
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