#11  
Old August 07, 2009, 08:20 AM
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Originally Posted by irmamar View Post
Marrón es el color de ciertas cosas...
Ah, I was correct.
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  #12  
Old August 07, 2009, 08:24 AM
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Originally Posted by chileno View Post
Ah, I was correct.
Don't you use that expression?
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  #13  
Old August 07, 2009, 09:12 AM
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En México no... me costó mucho trabajo saber qué significaba cuando la encontré en una canción de Joaquín Sabina.

(Me queda más claro ahora)
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  #14  
Old August 07, 2009, 04:05 PM
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Sí, es un poco escatológica
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  #15  
Old August 07, 2009, 04:34 PM
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Originally Posted by EmpanadaRica View Post
En holandés también conocemos dichos como:

- Suspendo (un examen) como un ladrillo (flunk a test/exam like a brick).
(' Zakken als een baksteen')

- Hundirse como un ladrillo (to sink like a brick)
('Zinken als een baksteen').

- o cando algo que se comó es muy pesado/grueso en el estómago
(¿Cómo se dice en español?) y se siente mal, se dice 'este se tende en estómago como un ladrillo'
('Dat ligt als een baksteen op je maag').

¿Se utiliza la palabra 'ladrillo' de esta manera en español también (es decir, en sentidos similares)?
Kan men ook zeggen "Het regent bakstenen"?
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  #16  
Old August 07, 2009, 08:16 PM
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Originally Posted by poli View Post
Oh wonderful baksteen is baked stone(brick) I know this is no revalation to you Empanada, but I find Dutch/England language similarities so interesting!

I believe I have heard Me cayo mál como un ladrillo
which is similar to the English: It landed in my stomach like a brick.
Yes you' re right they are quite striking at times, the similarities between these two languages. In fact Dutch vocabulary isn' t a problem for English speaking natives - they have a lot more problems with word order, which - like in German - can be crucial to the meaning because you may end up saying something very different just by switching words, especially when dealing with composite verbs. Also there can be a big difference between conjugations with 'to have' (hebben) and to be ('zijn').

E.g.

' Ik heb hem opgetrokken' - I have pulled him up.
' Ik ben met hem opgetrokken' - I have hung around with him

' Het is voorgekomen ' - It has happened.
' Hij kwam voor' - He appeared before the judge
' Hij voorkwam het/ Hij heeft het voorkomen' - He (has) prevented it



Thanks for the expression in Spanish!

Quote:
Originally Posted by brute View Post
Kan men ook zeggen "Het regent bakstenen"?
No, we don' t day it' s raining bricks, but something quite similar:
' De regen komt met bakstenen uit de lucht vallen'
('The rain is falling from the sky like bricks')

You could also say :
'Het regent pijpestelen' or
' Het regent dat het giet' (It rains that it pours, it' s pouring rain) or
' Het komt met bakken uit de lucht' (it' s falling from the sky with trays (of water)'

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  #17  
Old August 08, 2009, 07:50 AM
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Originally Posted by irmamar View Post
Don't you use that expression?
Para nada... ¡usamos la palabra directa!
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  #18  
Old August 08, 2009, 10:15 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EmpanadaRica View Post
Yes you' re right they are quite striking at times, the similarities between these two languages. In fact Dutch vocabulary isn' t a problem for English speaking natives - they have a lot more problems with word order, which - like in German - can be crucial to the meaning because you may end up saying something very different just by switching words, especially when dealing with composite verbs. Also there can be a big difference between conjugations with 'to have' (hebben) and to be ('zijn').

E.g.

' Ik heb hem opgetrokken' - I have pulled him up.
' Ik ben met hem opgetrokken' - I have hung around with him

' Het is voorgekomen ' - It has happened.
' Hij kwam voor' - He appeared before the judge
' Hij voorkwam het/ Hij heeft het voorkomen' - He (has) prevented it



Thanks for the expression in Spanish!



No, we don' t day it' s raining bricks, but something quite similar:
' De regen komt met bakstenen uit de lucht vallen'
('The rain is falling from the sky like bricks')

You could also say :
'Het regent pijpestelen' or
' Het regent dat het giet' (It rains that it pours, it' s pouring rain) or
' Het komt met bakken uit de lucht' (it' s falling from the sky with trays (of water)'

Wij kunnen zeggen dat "its raining stair-rods", "It never rains but it pours" en " its sheeting down".
We also use bricks in the expression "He's as thick as a brick" (Es tonto o estúpido.)
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  #19  
Old August 08, 2009, 12:27 PM
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Originally Posted by chileno View Post
Para nada... ¡usamos la palabra directa!
Jajaja, nosotros también la usamos
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  #20  
Old August 08, 2009, 04:44 PM
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EmpanadaRica EmpanadaRica is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brute View Post
Wij kunnen zeggen dat "its raining stair-rods", "It never rains but it pours" en " its sheeting down".
We also use bricks in the expression "He's as thick as a brick" (Es tonto o estúpido.)
Die laatste kende ik nog niet, grappig

Bekt ook wel lekker..
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