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How to combine "a ver cuando nos vemos" / "que te vayas muy bien"

 

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  #1  
Old April 26, 2019, 06:37 PM
Ulrich Ulrich is offline
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How to combine "a ver cuando nos vemos" / "que te vayas muy bien"

Hi there,

is it possible to say for example:

"A ver cuando nos vemos. Hasta entonces te vayas muy bien".

I'd like to say: Let's see when(ever) we see each other again...until then I whish you all the best.

Would you say anything like that in México?

Thanks in advance for your help!
Ulrich
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  #2  
Old April 27, 2019, 12:48 AM
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aleCcowaN aleCcowaN is offline
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You're almost there, but there're one or two things

A ver cuándo nos vemos de nuevo ... [the following is a tinsy bitsy unSpanish, style-wise]hasta ese momento, te deseo que te vaya muy bien

It made me thing "and after that moment, what?" as using "que te vaya muy bien" with sort of an expiration date is unusual. But if you use an "entre tanto" (meanwhile) instead of "until then"...

Following your original text and intention, I would say this

"... ¡y a ver cuándo nos vemos de nuevo! Te deseo lo mejor"

On the other hand:

que te vaya muy bien [verb "ir" and subject "it" or "all"] : may all be well for you
que te vayas muy bien [verb "irse" and subject "you"]: "may you leave very well" / may you leave on good terms
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Old April 27, 2019, 06:29 AM
Ulrich Ulrich is offline
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Hi ale,
Thanks for your explanations. It helps already a lot. The details about vayas and vaya bien are interesting.
Yet, I am not sure which phrase I like most. I want to make it as less wordy as possible.
Here another suggestions…perhaps you can tell me whether it makes sense to you:

A ver cuándo nos vemos, entre tanto (que) te vaya muy bien.

If it anyhow makes sense in Spanish I’d like to say it without “te deseo”. I would interpret “…entre tanto te vaya muy bien” like in English “…until then / meanwhile you have a good time” like you say “You have a good day”. Does it work?
Thank you for your help.
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Old April 27, 2019, 01:24 PM
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aleCcowaN aleCcowaN is offline
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For me both parts of the sentence don't match in regular Spanish speaking.

I tried to convey the same sentiment I see in your sentence but I find it doesn't work for me. With "A ver cuándo nos vemos" you're expressing kind of "I'm anxiously looking forward to our next meeting ", and then, by "hasta entonces" or even "entre tanto" you are sort of declaring you are not going to have any kind of contact with this person, which sounds like they embarked in the Mayflower for good while you remained in England, more than sounding like a twenty-first century personal relation.

If it's a casual relation, like when you exchange mail addresses with the member of another sport teem, and you're trying to say, like, when the schedule makes us be in the same town, then the second part makes sense, but not the first one in your Spanish version. In this case, I would say

Espero que nuestros caminos se crucen pronto nuevamente. Hasta entonces, te deseo lo mejor (excepto que los tuyos le ganen a nuestro equipo )

If the longing expressed by "a ver cuándo nos vemos" is real, because there is a developing affection -romantic or not- I would rather say

Y a ver cuando nos volvemos a ver. Mientras eso ocurre, te deseo lo mejor.

"mientras eso ocurre" sounds very simple but it's an advanced phrase. It means a suspensive condition: while we're expecting that condition (to meet again) to happen, if ever, I wish you the best.

As always, communication, and especially translations, depend on context.
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Old April 27, 2019, 10:32 PM
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AngelicaDeAlquezar AngelicaDeAlquezar is offline
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@Ulrich: In Mexico you may say: "A ver cuándo nos vemos. Que te vaya (muy) bien", with no linking word --unless you're writing a rather formal letter.

"Que te vaya bien" or "que estés bien" are colloquial expressions to say good-bye to someone and at the same time wish them well.

Also, "a ver cuándo nos vemos" is a way to express that you'd like to see the other person in the near future, but you're uncertain about the circumstances or the dates. This normally implies that you're either leaving it to a random meeting or that you both will communicate to agree on an appointment.
Although this may be used as a polite way of delaying an unwanted meeting, it normally expresses a true intention to see each other again.
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Last edited by AngelicaDeAlquezar; April 27, 2019 at 10:39 PM.
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Old April 29, 2019, 12:16 PM
Ulrich Ulrich is offline
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Thanks, Angelica, for that additional opinion.
Fascinating how much interpretation and options are possible.

One more question: Do you sometimes add the name to que te vay bien? !Que te vaya bien Angelica!?

@ale: I like "mientras eso ocurre"
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Old April 29, 2019, 07:39 PM
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In Mexico we rarely use the name of the person when we're talking to them, but it's a nice gesture and normally well received. In writing, though, you need a comma before the name: "Que te vaya bien, Ulrich."
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Old April 29, 2019, 08:20 PM
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aleCcowaN aleCcowaN is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ulrich View Post
Fascinating how much interpretation and options are possible.
... when you infer the most probable intonation for each instance. Intonation is a extremely powerful way to convey meaning and most of the phrases discussed have the expectation of certain intonations (or not).

Imagine someone replying in English "Everybody agrees on that", first time meaning "I'm informing you about this" and then meaning "Isn't it obvious, you dimwit?". Wouldn't those be two very different meanings for the same written phrase? There's something similar going on with many of the sentences discussed in this thread.
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