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Meaning Changes - Ser vs. Estar

 

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  #21  
Old December 26, 2011, 06:33 PM
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Elaina Elaina is offline
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Well, I would be careful saying "estas guapa hoy" to a co-worker.....

You know about sexual harrassment and all....

It is a shame that one can't compliment another without worrying if you are politically correct or not.

I would accept a compliment like that any day.
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  #22  
Old December 27, 2011, 01:39 PM
pacomartin123 pacomartin123 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Elaina View Post
Well, I would be careful saying "estas guapa hoy" to a co-worker.....You know about sexual harrassment and all....:footinmouth
Perhaps the safest thing is never to make a comment on appearances. But it seems as if Latino culture is less concerned about equating professionalism with being gender neutral.

Not all men are egocentric maniacs. Sometimes a simple compliment helps your confidence if you are nervous before a presentation. They don't all interpret "nice tie" to mean "she want's me".

I did notice that when I lived in Mexico, "Gordo" was a fairly common nickname, while "Fatty" is almost non-existent in Anglo culture. It seems as if the culture allows people to say it with some affection, and not only use it as an insult.
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  #23  
Old December 30, 2011, 01:07 PM
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Elaina Elaina is offline
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That is so true!

I guess we are more uptight here in the states about how we look or how others perceive us.

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  #24  
Old December 20, 2012, 09:06 AM
DocMolly DocMolly is offline
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I would be careful using ESTAR BUENO/A when speaking of people. In my experience, when you say.

"Miguel está bueno." You are saying Miguel is physically attractive. In other words: "He's hot."

Of course, if he were just sick and you were referring to his health, it would be understood as healthy.
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  #25  
Old December 20, 2012, 09:12 AM
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AngelicaDeAlquezar AngelicaDeAlquezar is offline
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I agree, although "bueno" in the sense of healthy is (too) colloquial.

Colloquial:
--¿Y Miguel, sigue malo?
--No, ya está bueno.

Non-colloquial:
--¿Y Miguel, sigue enfermo?
--No, ya está bien.
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  #26  
Old December 20, 2012, 09:52 AM
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Pero se presta para malas interpretaciones...
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  #27  
Old December 20, 2012, 12:43 PM
DocMolly DocMolly is offline
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Thanks for your input Angelica. Yes, you're right. I didn't think about this before, but I would say "está bien" when speaking of someone's health.
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  #28  
Old September 14, 2013, 10:10 AM
tetsuo tetsuo is offline
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Unfortunately only with ser and tener, but still entertaining...
http://www.digitaldialects.com/Spanish/tobetohave.htm
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  #29  
Old October 03, 2013, 09:35 PM
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What a great discussion. I'd add one more thing:
- Estar perezoso: To have a bad attitude and unwilling to do something (momentarily)
- Ser perezoso: To be lazy (all the time)
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  #30  
Old January 25, 2014, 02:30 PM
El Gato El Gato is offline
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Are there meaning changes with all emotions if you use ser instead of estar?

Like:
Estar feliz
Ser feliz

Estar enojado
Ser enojado

Estar triste
Ser triste
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