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Diferencia entre un objeto indirecto y un dativo?

 

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  #1  
Old December 04, 2019, 09:01 AM
babymetal babymetal is offline
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Diferencia entre un objeto indirecto y un dativo?

Cuál es la diferencia principal entre los dos? Por lo que puedo ver, la diferencia es que un dativo no se requiere por el verbo para tener sentido. Hay alguien que me pueda dar unos ejemplos?

Last edited by babymetal; December 04, 2019 at 09:04 AM.
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  #2  
Old December 07, 2019, 10:56 PM
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¿Nos puedes dar un poco más de información, para saber de manera más precisa cuál es tu duda?
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Old December 09, 2019, 09:13 AM
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No se le ve la cara. (They don't see his/her face)

No se lo di. (I didn't give it to him/her)
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Old December 09, 2019, 03:39 PM
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Sorry, I can't see what your question is; both sentences are using the indirect object:

- No se le ve la cara.
Although the verb "ver" can take a direct object,. there is none here. It's incorrect to say "no se la ve la cara", but I can say "no se ve a María", then I do have a direct object, because it's "María" the person or thing that cannot be seen. But if I say "no se le ve la cara a María", there is a part of María's body that can't be seen, so I use an indirect object pronoun to talk about it, not María herself.
(Side note: "se" here is neither a direct object nor an indirect object pronoun, but an impersonal; we don't know who can't see the face of the person in the sentence.)

- No se lo di.
When I say that I give something to someone, the thing I give is the direct object and the person to whom I give the thing is the indirect object.
If I say "no le di el libro a Cristina", I can replace with a direct object pronoun and an indirect object pronoun "el libro" and "Cristina", respectively.
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Old December 10, 2019, 09:17 AM
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What I mean is, is that "le" in the first example isn't really having anything done to it, but "le" in the second is receiving something. Unless I am mistaken?
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Old December 10, 2019, 11:06 AM
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First of all, an indirect object is always dative (whether it's a noun or a pronoun).

By definition, dative = indirect object.

In English, we have four cases: nominative, accusative, dative and genitive.
We hardly notice these cases in English because a noun, or its corresponding pronoun, doesn't change in form depending on which case it is (with a couple of exceptions).
German also has four cases (with the same classifications English has been handed by linguists), but the nouns in German, and the respective pronouns, do take different forms.
Russian has six cases, adding instrumental and reflexive cases to the lineup English/German has, all with different forms.
Latin has six cases, adding ablative and vocative to the lineup English/German has; again, all take different forms.
I could go on.
In the languages where different noun/pronoun forms are used, it would be possible to rearrange them without any change in meaning (because their forms dictate usage).
In English, a noun/pronoun in the nominative case is the subject. A noun/pronoun in the accusative case is the direct object. A noun/pronoun in the dative case is the indirect object. A noun/pronoun in the genitive case shows possession.


Angelica explained that the 'le' in the first sentence is the indirect object pronoun. It corresponds to 'a María' (added for clarification or emphasis in the 'no se le ve la cara a María' example). The pronoun 'se' represents the impersonal subject.

It your second example, as Angelica explained, 'se' represents the direct object (accusative case) and 'le' represents the indirect object (dative case) of the verb 'dar.'
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