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Hay que desencillar (desensillar) hasta que aclare

 

An idiom is an expression whose meaning is not readily apparent based on the individual words in the expression. This forum is dedicated to discussing idioms and other sayings.


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  #21  
Old May 07, 2010, 04:04 PM
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Phrases like this aren't that common, it's actually the first time hear it, and I have read about Peronism many times. It's just that, a figurative way to say that you have to "take it easy" till scene gets quite enough to continue with what you were doing/planning to do, to mount again.
This is a very specific phrase... I'll pay you if you hear this while you stay here.

What you are going to hear depends a lot of the places you'll visit and with who you'll talk. On a museum, at the university, with that family... I think you will adapt really fast.
Now, the "informal" and "relaxed" argentinian language has maybe some notorious differences with other places, because of the influence of "lunfardo" for example. But that would not be a problem, I can assure it.

As others told you, don't think to much about this, just practying Spanish is enough. The specific things will come alone, you can always ask the other to explain to you what you don't understand, and he will say it in a neutral Spanish without problem.

Living with a family for learning is the best! do you know how the family is formed?
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Last edited by ookami; May 07, 2010 at 04:07 PM.
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  #22  
Old May 07, 2010, 06:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ookami View Post
Phrases like this aren't that common, it's actually the first time hear it, and I have read about Peronism many times. It's just that, a figurative way to say that you have to "take it easy" till scene gets quite enough to continue with what you were doing/planning to do, to mount again.
This is a very specific phrase... I'll pay you if you hear this while you stay here.

What you are going to hear depends a lot of the places you'll visit and with who you'll talk. On a museum, at the university, with that family... I think you will adapt really fast.
Now, the "informal" and "relaxed" Argentinian language has maybe some notorious differences with other places, because of the influence of "lunfardo", for example. But that would not be a problem, I can assure you.

As others told you, don't think too much about this, just practicing Spanish is enough. The specific things will come alone, you can always ask the other to explain to you what you don't understand, and he will say it in a neutral Spanish without problem.

Living with a family for learning is the best! Do you know how the family is formed?
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  #23  
Old May 08, 2010, 12:31 AM
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Thanks chileno
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  #24  
Old May 08, 2010, 06:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ookami View Post
Phrases like this aren't that common, it's actually the first time hear it, and I have read about Peronism many times. It's just that, a figurative way to say that you have to "take it easy" till scene gets quite enough to continue with what you were doing/planning to do, to mount again.
This is a very specific phrase... I'll pay you if you hear this while you stay here.

What you are going to hear depends a lot of the places you'll visit and with who you'll talk. On a museum, at the university, with that family... I think you will adapt really fast.
Now, the "informal" and "relaxed" argentinian language has maybe some notorious differences with other places, because of the influence of "lunfardo" for example. But that would not be a problem, I can assure it.

As others told you, don't think to much about this, just practying Spanish is enough. The specific things will come alone, you can always ask the other to explain to you what you don't understand, and he will say it in a neutral Spanish without problem.

Living with a family for learning is the best! do you know how the family is formed?
I'm not sure what you mean by "how the family is formed". Hmmm....

Anyway - I know that this phrase isn't vital to my ability to spend a month in Argentina. It was just interesting in the context in which I was reading, and I also want to try to get a grasp of phrases/idioms when I come upon them. If I skip over every idiomatic phrase because I might not need to know it, I won't learn anything interesting in Spanish.......

By the way - I found this post in another forum, and this Argentine says that he hears it in the countryside where he lives: http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=1456295
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  #25  
Old May 08, 2010, 12:46 PM
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No, I was referring that, if you have to study something(chossing), maybe it's better to study grammar or neutral things than slang or very idiomatic phrases(that keep changing), but sure that if you find yourself in front of a idiomatic phrase, to try to understand it will be the best thing.
Now, I think that from ten idiomatic phrases/slang you may here, at least eight will be rude, gross/vulgar. (at least here)

About the question, I tried to ask if you know the persons the family has... "how is the family formed?" it is bad this way? An answer will be: a couple, parents with a young child, an old lady living alone, etc.

Maybe in the countryside is common(well all phrases are more commonly used at the countryside), I don't know, but at least in the city I don't hear with frequency that kind of phrases, even common ones as "al que madruga Dios le ayuda" or "está fresco para chomba". All people will understand them and will seem common to theirs ears, but -at least in the city- today's people don't seem to use phrases with relative complexity that much. Now, despective ways of talking always remain.
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  #26  
Old May 08, 2010, 01:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ookami View Post
No, I was referring that, if you have to study something(chossing), maybe it's better to study grammar or neutral things than slang or very idiomatic phrases(that keep changing), but sure that if you find yourself in front of a idiomatic phrase, to try to understand it will be the best thing.
Now, I think that from ten idiomatic phrases/slang you may hear, at least eight will be rude, gross/vulgar. (at least here)

About the question, I tried to ask if you know the persons/people the family has... "how is the family formed?" it is bad this way? An answer will be: a couple, parents with a young child, an old lady living alone, etc.

Maybe in the countryside is common(well all phrases are more commonly used at the countryside), I don't know, but at least in the city I don't hear with frequency that kind of phrases, even common ones as "al que madruga Dios le ayuda" or "está fresco para chomba". All people will understand them and will seem common to theirs ears, but -at least in the city- today's people don't seem to use phrases with relative complexity that much. Now, despective despicable/censurable ways of talking always remain.
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  #27  
Old May 08, 2010, 02:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ookami View Post
About the question, I tried to ask if you know the persons the family has... "how is the family formed?" it is bad this way? An answer will be: a couple, parents with a young child, an old lady living alone, etc.
No, we wouldn't ask the question that way. We would probably just say "Do you know anything about your host family?" It's admittedly inadequate and definitely not specific enough. The question-asker might need to add additional questions:
- "Do you know anything about your host family? Is it a single person? A couple? With children? Older? Younger? (Etc...)"

And, no, I don't know yet what the family is like. We are supposed to receive that information soon. I have heard that the families probably live in Belgrano, but might live a little farther and we'd have to take public transportation to the university. I'd love to get a good walk to/from class ... not TOO far, but it would be good for exercise if I had to hike a bit every day.
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  #28  
Old May 08, 2010, 05:26 PM
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Originally Posted by laepelba View Post
No, we wouldn't ask the question that way. We would probably just say "Do you know anything about your host family?" It's admittedly inadequate and definitely not specific enough. The question-asker might need to add additional questions:
- "Do you know anything about your host family? Is it a single person? A couple? With children? Older? Younger? (Etc...)"

And, no, I don't know yet what the family is like. We are supposed to receive that information soon. I have heard that the families probably live in Belgrano, but might live a little farther and we'd have to take public transportation to the university. I'd love to get a good walk to/from class ... not TOO far, but it would be good for exercise if I had to hike a bit every day.
Castellano por favor. :-)

No es necesario que sea perfecto, ni siquiera cerca de la perfección, solo que sea en castellano.
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  #29  
Old May 08, 2010, 06:56 PM
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Originally Posted by chileno View Post
Castellano por favor. :-)

No es necesario que sea perfecto, ni siquiera cerca de la perfección, solo que sea en castellano.
Fui explicando a Ookami sobre su inglés. Quería escribir lo en inglés. Además, no estoy usando mi computadora - estoy en Nueva York, y uso la computadora de mi mamá, sin teclado español. Se demora una eternidad a escribir con el menú desplegable. No tienes idea como de cuanto tiempo es necesario para mí para escribir en español, incluso con mi teclado. Cuando no tengo mucho tiempo, no escribo en español.

Pues ... ¿qué es "Castellano"? No sé Castellano. Quiero aprender español....

Pasé casi 15 minutos para teclear esto...
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  #30  
Old May 08, 2010, 07:44 PM
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Originally Posted by laepelba View Post
Fui explicando a Ookami sobre su inglés. Quería escribir lo en inglés. Además, no estoy usando mi computadora - estoy en Nueva York, y uso la computadora de mi mamá, sin teclado español. Se demora una eternidad a escribir con el menú desplegable. No tienes idea como de cuanto tiempo es necesario para mí para escribir en español, incluso con mi teclado. Cuando no tengo mucho tiempo, no escribo en español.

Pues ... ¿qué es "Castellano"? No sé Castellano. Quiero aprender español....

Pasé casi 15 minutos para teclear esto...
Muy bien! Me gusta verte escribir en español

PD castellano es un otro nombre para "español"

I believe the region in Spain is Castillo. Está ahí la RAE.
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