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Old September 09, 2010, 02:40 PM
QueenT26 QueenT26 is offline
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De between noun and adjective

I am perplexed as to when I use "de" in between spanish nouns and their adjectives. For an example:

No "de" in between noun and its adjective
(English)"Red wine or white wine
(Spanish) "Vino rojo o vino blanco

"De" in between noun and adjective
(English) I use a different software program everyday.
(Spanish) "Uso un programa de software diferente cada día."

I assume it is because although software is an adjective here, it is more commonly used as a noun; therefore, when a noun is used as an adjective, you place "de _(adjective)__" after the modified noun.

If this is not correct or if it is, please let me know. Gracias!
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  #2  
Old September 09, 2010, 02:58 PM
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poli poli is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by QueenT26 View Post
I am perplexed as to when I use "de" in between spanish nouns and their adjectives. For an example:

No "de" in between noun and its adjective
(English)"Red wine or white wine
(Spanish) "Vino rojo o vino blanco

"De" in between noun and adjective
(English) I use a different software program everyday.
(Spanish) "Uso un programa de software diferente cada día."

I assume it is because although software is an adjective here, it is more commonly used as a noun; therefore, when a noun is used as an adjective, you place "de _(adjective)__" after the modified noun.

If this is not correct or if it is, please let me know. Gracias!
The de in programa de software is a function of Spanish. the de
means which pertains to.
In the case of red wine/vino tinto (not rojo) Red is inherent to the wine. I doesn't pertain to the wine.

I hope this helps.
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  #3  
Old September 09, 2010, 04:25 PM
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Rusty Rusty is offline
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Actually, 'software program' is two nouns. When a noun modifies a noun, it's called an adjunct in English. The word 'software' could be omitted and it wouldn't change the grammar of the sentence. In other words, 'program' would still be either the subject or another object in the sentence. The adjunct is simply modifying the noun 'program'.

In Spanish, an adjunct can only exist if 'de' precedes it, and both words must follow the noun that is being modified.
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Old September 10, 2010, 03:06 AM
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I agree with Rusty. They are nouns, there isn't any adjective. If I said "vino tinto", tinto is an adjective. If I said "vino de Rioja", Rioja is a noun, so I use "de".
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Old September 10, 2010, 03:36 AM
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JPablo JPablo is offline
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This is what is what is called "genitive".
Sofware program = programa de software = "program of software".

Also called "complemento del nombre" or "complemento nominal".

Obviously, it is a "noun" modifying another "noun". So, "function-wise" you could say that it works like an adjective, but it is not.

Hablante de español = Spanish speaker = Speaker of Spanish.
(Spanish = noun)
Hispanohablante = Spanish speaker (Spanish = Adjective)

I hope this helps, in addition to Rusty's and Irma's comments.

[Espero que esto ayude, además de los comentarios de Rusty y de Irma.]

(Comentarios de Rusty y de Irma = Rusty's and Irma's comments = comments of Rusty and [of] Irma = Comments made by Rusty and by Irma)
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