Ask a Question

(Create a thread)
Go Back   Spanish language learning forums > Spanish & English Languages > Vocabulary


Colegio - and all the other words

 

Ask about definitions or translations for Spanish or English words.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old November 01, 2007, 03:23 PM
bleitzow bleitzow is offline
Ruby
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: San Diego, CA, USA
Posts: 89
Native Language: English
bleitzow is on a distinguished road
Question Colegio - and all the other words

Hey there everyone!

I need some help to understand if there is a difference in the words below. I am using a software package that shows me a photo of something and gives me the word in Spanish.

I am confused as to whether or not the age of the students in the photos has anything to do with the words, or if they are just different photos and different ways to say the same thing.

El Colegio - a photo of elementary school children in a classroom
El Instituto - a photo of junior high or high school students in a classroom
La Universidad - a photo of adults in a classroom

¡Ayúdame por favor!

¡Gracias!
__________________
~ Brenda
Reply With Quote
   
Get rid of these ads by registering for a free Tomísimo account.
  #2  
Old November 01, 2007, 07:18 PM
Rusty's Avatar
Rusty Rusty is offline
Señor Speedy
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 11,339
Native Language: American English
Rusty has a spectacular aura aboutRusty has a spectacular aura about
El colegio can certainly be used as a generic term for school, just as much as la escuela can be used. I personally would not use colegio to mean elementary school. When I was in Central America they used la escuela primaria, or just la primaria. The next level of schooling was la escuela secundaria. I would think the terms vary from place to place and it would be best to focus on what the local people call them.

I've heard el colegio and la universidad used for both college and university. I don't remember hearing el instituto, except when they were talking about an institution, like a trade school or MIT. Again, I would suggest learning what the local people use.

Let's see what a native speaker says. Perhaps these are 'catch-all' words that everyone would understand, but they weren't used where I was.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old November 02, 2007, 10:45 AM
bleitzow bleitzow is offline
Ruby
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: San Diego, CA, USA
Posts: 89
Native Language: English
bleitzow is on a distinguished road
Wink Colegio

¡Gracias Rusty! Where was you? Ha, just a little grammar joke there. What country were you in? I am in San Diego but I´m learning Castilian from Spain. My Mexican friend is always telling me "that´s not a word". Yeah, it´s just not a word she knows. I´ve been watching Spanish TV and hear those very same words on the news. She tends to speak mostly slang so I have to double-check a lot of the things she says with you guys.

Thanks for being there!
__________________
~ Brenda
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old November 02, 2007, 03:19 PM
Rusty's Avatar
Rusty Rusty is offline
Señor Speedy
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 11,339
Native Language: American English
Rusty has a spectacular aura aboutRusty has a spectacular aura about
I was in Panama, Costa Rica, Nicaragua, and Honduras. It is interesting to note that a different flavor of Spanish (Castellano) was spoken in each country. I tried to mimic the differences so that I wouldn't stand out. For example, 'niño' was understood and said in each of the four countries, but each had a slang word for 'child', as well. The slang word turned out to be different in each country. This is why I recommend learning what the local people use instead of relying on a single source for your vocabulary.

The same sort of thing happens in the United States. There's a world of difference between the English spoken in southern Californian and southern Georgia. Someone asked me once in Tennessee if I wanted a 'fat biscuit'. I got a doughnut when I ventured a yes. In Panama, you could ask for a 'banana' and get one. In Honduras, you had to ask for a 'guineo' to get the same thing.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old November 02, 2007, 03:42 PM
bleitzow bleitzow is offline
Ruby
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: San Diego, CA, USA
Posts: 89
Native Language: English
bleitzow is on a distinguished road
Colegio

That's so true. My aunt was just visiting from Texas. We went to the grocery store and she said she needed a buggy. I said, "A what?" She said, "A buggy" and made a motion. I said, "Oh, you mean a shopping cart." We're from the same country and I had no idea what she was talking about. That's okay. People from Texas are foreigners anyway.
__________________
~ Brenda
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old November 03, 2007, 09:26 AM
sosia's Avatar
sosia sosia is offline
Ankh-Morpork's citizen
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: a 55 cm del monitor
Posts: 2,984
Native Language: Spanish (Spain)
sosia has a spectacular aura aboutsosia has a spectacular aura about
Quote:
Originally Posted by bleitzow View Post
Hey there everyone!

I need some help to understand if there is a difference in the words below. I am using a software package that shows me a photo of something and gives me the word in Spanish.

I am confused as to whether or not the age of the students in the photos has anything to do with the words, or if they are just different photos and different ways to say the same thing.

El Colegio - a photo of elementary school children in a classroom
El Instituto - a photo of junior high or high school students in a classroom
La Universidad - a photo of adults in a classroom

¡Ayúdame por favor!

¡Gracias!
This is obvious a software from SPAIN.
Guardería: 1-3 years
Escuela preescolar: 3-5 years
Colegio ó Escuela: 6-15 years
Instituto: 15-18 years
Universidad: 18-.....

Every 5 years it chages a bit because the different educational systems, but more or less it's so.
In some schools the have the "Instituto" integrated, so they can say they were in the "colegio" from the 6 years old until 18 years old.

Saludos
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old November 03, 2007, 11:09 PM
bleitzow bleitzow is offline
Ruby
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: San Diego, CA, USA
Posts: 89
Native Language: English
bleitzow is on a distinguished road
Talking

Sosia,

Yes, the software is definitely from Spain. Everyone I've asked said it was all the same but it just didn't feel the same. I finally got confirmation that I'm not going crazy ~ well, over this anyway.

Thank you so much!
__________________
~ Brenda
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old November 06, 2007, 09:42 AM
Elaina's Avatar
Elaina Elaina is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Midwest
Posts: 2,565
Native Language: English
Elaina will become famous soon enough
Angry

Hola Brenda.......

I don't feel as a foreigner and I am originally from Texas.

Elaina
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old November 06, 2007, 12:05 PM
bleitzow bleitzow is offline
Ruby
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: San Diego, CA, USA
Posts: 89
Native Language: English
bleitzow is on a distinguished road
Wink

Elaina -

You have my sympathy. My parents live in Texas. I joke with them all the time about how they talk funny and they're "so out of touch" that they are foreigners.

My mom jokes that they now have TWO McDonald's restaurants AND a Wal*Mart!
__________________
~ Brenda
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old November 12, 2007, 05:27 AM
Josef Josef is offline
Opal
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 2
Josef is on a distinguished road
I wish luck to anyone trying to learn Spanish. This is my first post in this great forum and I use tomisimo.org all the time as a great reference.

I have been studying for the past two years ever since I prepared for my visit to Colombia. Ever since I have been trying to advance my language skills and there are many pitfalls which include the various words used for certain things.

I am currently in Korea and the local language here (Hangul) doesn't help much in my studies. lol
Reply With Quote
Reply

 

Link to this thread
URL: 
HTML Link: 
BB Code: 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts
BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Site Rules

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Linoleum and a few other words qwerty Vocabulary 6 May 08, 2008 08:47 AM
Madid & some spanish words sosia Vocabulary 6 April 13, 2007 12:51 AM
The 500 Most Commonly Used Words in the English Language sosia Vocabulary 1 March 26, 2007 03:25 PM
Help with several words seaverj2 Vocabulary 4 September 08, 2006 05:17 AM
List of English words of Spanish origin sosia Vocabulary 2 July 28, 2006 11:46 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:08 AM.

Forum powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2024, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

X