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  #1  
Old February 27, 2010, 06:51 AM
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Salir de

Why is there a de after salir in this sentence?

Eran las doce y media cuando los recién casados decidieron salir de luna de miel.
It was twelve-thirty when the newlyweds decided to leave on their honeymoon.

thanks
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  #2  
Old February 27, 2010, 07:15 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cmon View Post
Why is there a de after salir in this sentence?

Eran las doce y media cuando los recién casados decidieron salir de luna de miel.
It was twelve-thirty when the newlyweds decided to leave on their honeymoon.

thanks
Correct.

I am not sure what you are asking.

Is like asking why is there an "on" after leave in the phrase.... as opposed to in=en?

Is that it?

Last edited by chileno; February 27, 2010 at 07:19 AM.
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  #3  
Old February 27, 2010, 07:26 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cmon View Post
Why is there a de after salir in this sentence?

Eran las doce y media cuando los recién casados decidieron salir de luna de miel.
It was twelve-thirty when the newlyweds decided to leave on their honeymoon.

thanks
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Originally Posted by chileno View Post
Correct.

I am not sure what you are asking.
She (?) is asking a good question. Why salir de ? I think the answer is that "on honeymoon" is translated as de luna de miel, and the de is part of that expression, not a preposition demanded by salir.
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  #4  
Old February 27, 2010, 07:39 AM
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Originally Posted by Perikles View Post
She (?) is asking a good question.
I never said that it was a bad question. Just that I did not understand her doubts on the expression.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Perikles View Post
Why salir de ? I think the answer is that "on honeymoon" is translated as de luna de miel, and the de is part of that expression, not a preposition demanded by salir.
Now that you mention a preposition demanded by salir

Salir de luna de miel - leave on a honeymoon.

Salir a su luna de miel - leave on/to their honeymoon.

Salir en su luna de miel - leave (while) in their honeymoon.
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  #5  
Old February 27, 2010, 07:48 AM
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Thanks
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  #6  
Old February 27, 2010, 07:58 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chileno View Post
Now that you mention a preposition demanded by salir

Salir de luna de miel - leave on a honeymoon.

Salir a su luna de miel - leave on/to their honeymoon.

Salir en su luna de miel - leave (while) in their honeymoon.
I actually have some trouble with the preposition required by "salir" because in English, we often just say something like "I leave the house" - but in Spanish, it seems to me that you need some sense of direction, "I leave the house TO GO TO work" or that "I leave FROM the house..." etc. Thus, there need to be different meanings that come with "salir de" vs. "salir a", etc. as you've pointed out....
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Old February 27, 2010, 08:02 AM
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Originally Posted by Perikles View Post
Thanks
You're welcome.

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Originally Posted by laepelba View Post
I actually have some trouble with the preposition required by "salir" because in English, we often just say something like "I leave the house" - but in Spanish, it seems to me that you need some sense of direction, "I leave the house TO GO TO work" or that "I leave FROM the house..." etc. Thus, there need to be different meanings that come with "salir de" vs. "salir a", etc. as you've pointed out....
Correct. As in English, just that you don't realize of it...
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  #8  
Old February 27, 2010, 08:10 AM
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Originally Posted by laepelba View Post
I actually have some trouble with the preposition required by "salir" because in English, we often just say something like "I leave the house" - but in Spanish, it seems to me that you need some sense of direction, .
That is because to leave can be transitive, but salir is intransitive.

I left my wallet in a taxi (transitive, you can't use salir)
I left my wife (transitive)
I was fed up so I left (intransitive - you could use salir)
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  #9  
Old February 27, 2010, 08:24 AM
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Originally Posted by Perikles View Post
That is because to leave can be transitive, but salir is intransitive.

I left my wallet in a taxi (transitive, you can't use salir)
I left my wife (transitive)
I was fed up so I left (intransitive - you could use salir)
Interesting that you point that out. I had a very interesting conversation the other day with some Spanish speaking students (new to speaking English - the same ones who had the "front of the room/back of the room" confusion). They were trying to explain to me when they use the word "salir" and when they use the word "dejar". Of course, then we started talking about the use of the word "leave" in English, and the one gal was TOTALLY confused about the phrase "leave me alone". I found the whole thing quite interesting!
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  #10  
Old February 27, 2010, 09:45 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cmon View Post
Why is there a de after salir in this sentence?

Eran las doce y media cuando los recién casados decidieron salir de luna de miel.
It was twelve-thirty when the newlyweds decided to leave on their honeymoon.

thanks
Really I don't know what are you saying there.
May you be more explicit in your question.
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