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Punto y aparte

 

An idiom is an expression whose meaning is not readily apparent based on the individual words in the expression. This forum is dedicated to discussing idioms and other sayings.


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  #11  
Old July 28, 2009, 01:09 PM
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So I suppose you can use punto y aparte
to mean: to change the subject...
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  #12  
Old July 28, 2009, 03:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by irmamar View Post
Is full stop a period in BrE? I had always heard full stop as "punto y aparte", and "stop" as "punto" (and I've learnt BrE). Copy from wordreference.com:

punto y aparte, full stop, new paragraph
Full stop is used in British English, period is used in North American English, and punto is used in Spanish. These are equivalent and refer to the punctuation mark that is a dot (.) and is used to end a declarative sentence.

Punto y aparte means to end the sentence and start a new paragraph, so punto y aparte means "full stop, new paragraph" (in British English) or "period, new paragraph" (in North American English).
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  #13  
Old July 28, 2009, 03:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by poli View Post
So I suppose you can use punto y aparte
to mean: to change the subject...
Probably. You could also use "cambiar de tema".
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  #14  
Old July 29, 2009, 03:36 AM
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OK, thanks, tom*simo.
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  #15  
Old July 29, 2009, 04:11 PM
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It's really interesting to read.

Maybe you could say:
'Enough about this already'.
'Let's change the subject'.
'Let's drop this (subject)'.
If you want to tell somone: 'Let it go already'.

It' s interesting to see that it is used in two different ways, where we have two very similar expressions in Dutch meaning the same.

'punto y aparte' in the sense of 'period, new subject':
'punt uit!' (punto, terminado')

'punto y aparte' in the sense of 'another case entirely', 'a special case':
'een geval apart' (un caso aparte).
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  #16  
Old July 30, 2009, 02:25 AM
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Is that "geval" pronounced with that horrible /j/ I'm not able to pronounce?
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  #17  
Old July 30, 2009, 03:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by irmamar View Post
Is that "geval" pronounced with that horrible /j/ I'm not able to pronounce?
Probably...
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  #18  
Old July 30, 2009, 11:54 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by irmamar View Post
Is full stop a period in BrE? I had always heard full stop as "punto y aparte", and "stop" as "punto" (and I've learnt BrE). Copy from wordreference.com:

punto y aparte, full stop, new paragraph
full stop is simply "." We do not use the word period in this context. We do not have a special term for a full stop at the end of a paragraph. If we are dictating we would say "full stop, new paragraph"

I believe that a "period" in US can also be a complete complex sentence. Is this correct?

Last edited by brute; July 30, 2009 at 01:50 PM.
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  #19  
Old July 30, 2009, 10:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brute View Post
I believe that a "period" in US can also be a complete complex sentence. Is this correct?
Most people wouldn't recognize that term, but yes, it can refer to a meaningful, impressive, well-balanced/formed and complex sentence.
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