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Old February 04, 2017, 08:21 AM
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Ahuevar

Ha sido un tiempo desde mi último post.

Encontré esta palabra en un post de Pintrest:
4. Ahuevar = To chicken out

Parece que ninguno de los traductores de la máquina es capaz de traducirlo. ¿Es una palabra bastante común para preocuparse?

También encontré la frase
El barrio chino es peligroso de noche. ¡Ten cuidado!
The red-light district is dangerous at night. Be careful!
Esto parece un poco racista a mí.

Como siempre, gracias.
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  #2  
Old February 04, 2017, 09:59 AM
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ahuevar algo = shape something like an egg, add egg whites to wine (to clarify)
ahuevar a alguien = scare/frighten someone (in some Latin American countries)
ahuevarse = chicken out


red-light district = barrio chino (Spain), zona roja, barrio rojo

Not wanting to offend, racism (and all political correctness) is, in my opinion, over-emphasized in the USA. Many words in many languages have roots that can be traced to characterizations and perceptions, most of them pejorative. Almost all the colors I can think of, in English and in Spanish, have been used in disparaging ways (blue movie, green with envy, white trash, etc.). In English it's considered rude to say someone is fat or skinny. In Spanish, it's normal to be called gordito o flaquito. You'd also be extremely happy being called negrito o moreno in Spanish.

I personally don't see a problem with calling someone deaf. That is a terrific word. I refuse to say that someone is 'hearing impaired'. The deaf call themselves deaf, so why are we being told that that term is offensive? The deaf are offended when we call them 'hearing impaired'.
The blacks call themselves black. They even use the 'n' word entre si. Why can't crackers (their word for white people) use the same terms the blacks do? Give me a break!
The Spanish use sordo to designate the deaf, calvo to designate the bald, and manco to describe someone who has lost a hand or an arm. Why are we Americans asked to use 'challenged' or 'impaired'? I'd rather say someone doesn't know how get from point A to point B without a map or a GPS than call them geographically-challenged. What does a bald person call themselves? They call themselves bald, not follicly-challenged or an egghead. Let's get real!
I'll get off my soapbox now.

Last edited by Rusty; February 04, 2017 at 10:02 AM.
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Old February 04, 2017, 05:14 PM
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Yes.
I subscribe your very qualified opinions!
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Old February 05, 2017, 12:52 AM
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Seconded

Let's stop the epidemics of badly understood "political correctness".
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Old February 05, 2017, 01:49 PM
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¿Dónde vas?
Voy a huevear por ahí?
Where are you going?
To mess around.
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Old February 05, 2017, 10:46 PM
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The old word for politically correct is polite. Politically incorrect is simply impolite. I believe concerns about being impolite are valid, and I also think that being oversensitive about rude words or rudeness in general is wrong too. Rudeness, however, is coarsening. As a result, people get calloused to hurtful behavior. Autocrats become presidents. Standards get cheapened.
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Old February 06, 2017, 04:01 AM
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"Oversensitive about rude words" is the most offensive a person can be if they are free to define what "rude" is.

A blind person is well adapted when they acknowledge they're blind and live their life in full. People calling them "visually disabled" are mocking them in the worst way: they are defining them by what they lack and not by what they have, and they are pitying them in such a way by believing blind people can't even take to be called blind because they are depicted as living in mourn about their disabilities and they are believed to never adapt.

What would you think if I called you "transiently disabled Spanish speaker". Am I celebrating what you have achieved or rudely and suspiciously focusing on what you still lack? If I wanted to be perceived as a sensible person I would use the TDSS term with total disregard to what you may feel about it. Those are the ways of political correctness.

The inability to get something so simple is amazing. Then, you have PISA scores that have been slightly declining over the years, and the election of the first Latin American POTUS. Then, one understands. "Barrio chino", "visually disabled", "alternative reality". Frankness has passed away, politeness has passed away, truth has passed away. And it's "passing away" and not something else, so it shouldn't be that bad, should it?
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Old February 06, 2017, 08:48 AM
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Quote:
Ha sido un tiempo desde mi último post.
Creo que "Ha pasado algun tiempo desde mi último post", estaría mejor.
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Last edited by Sancho Panther; February 06, 2017 at 08:58 AM.
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Old February 06, 2017, 06:02 PM
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Someone who is visually impaired is exactly that. I am visually impaired. I need glasses to read. Calling me blind would be untrue. It would be like calling someone with a hearing impediment deaf.

Harsh words and hyperbole have their place. But if all you use is bluntness, your language loses contour, and if taken to the extremes by the majority of people, can be very harmful to society.
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Old February 06, 2017, 11:18 PM
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I'm myopic and astigmatic. Calling me "blind" is stupid. Calling me "visually impaired" is insulting, unless it's patronizing, what is even worse. The correct terms in Spanish, with those unfamiliar with medical terms. are "corto de vista" or simply "usa anteojos(or gafas, or lentes)/lentes de contacto(or lentillas)". "Visually impaired" as a euphemism has no translation. You may speak of "gente con limitaciones visuales" in general.

The whole thing of even having to explain this, it's ridiculous.
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