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A couple of American terms.

 

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  #1  
Old August 19, 2008, 02:51 PM
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A couple of American terms.

I heard these two words in an American show I watch with my daughter, and even though I can guess the meaning I might be wrong.
- The jocks ( the context was a group of teenagers in a high school talking about other kids). Are the jocks the popular guys?
- MIT : I guess it's a college. Am I right?
And one more thing I've just remembered:SB (you Americans use a lot more initials than the British and although I've managed to master some of them, many still escape me)
I have to admit I find initials and guessing what they stand for a great exercise, and besides they are very useful.
In some cases I choose to use the American word because it's a lot faster (I love talking about medicine and medical dramas...)
Some examples:
OR v. (operating theatre)
OB v. obstetrician or gynaecologist
CBC v. blood test
It's true that in some cases it's not only a distinction between continents but also a question of context. And aren't some vocab differences becoming blurry in this mass media world of ours?
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  #2  
Old August 19, 2008, 03:00 PM
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About these terms...

Hi Maria,

Yes, MIT is actually a school. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology. "jock" is used to label the guys who belong to sports teams, and usually they are popular

--Hawkgirl
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Old August 19, 2008, 03:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by María José View Post
I heard these two words in an American show I watch with my daughter, and even though I can guess the meaning I might be wrong.
- The jocks ( the context was a group of teenagers in a high school talking about other kids). Are the jocks the popular guys?Guys who are good at sports
- MIT : I guess it's a college. Am I right?Massachusetts Institute of Technology (a school)
And one more thing I've just remembered:SB (you Americans use a lot more initials than the British and although I've managed to master some of them, many still escape me)Should be?
I have to admit I find initials and guessing what they stand for a great exercise, and besides they are very useful.
In some cases I choose to use the American word because it's a lot faster (I love talking about medicine and medical dramas...)
Some examples:
OR v. (operating theatre)
OB v. obstetrician or gynaecologistmore commonly ob/gyn
CBC v. blood testcbc(complete blood count)
It's true that in some cases it's not only a distinction between continents but also a question of context. And aren't some vocab differences becoming blurry in this mass media world of ours?
We still have differences in vocabulary. For example (one among many) just ask for an aubergine, and you'll get a funny look.
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Old August 19, 2008, 03:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by María José View Post
I heard these two words in an American show I watch with my daughter, and even though I can guess the meaning I might be wrong.
- The jocks ( the context was a group of teenagers in a high school talking about other kids). Are the jocks the popular guys?
- MIT : I guess it's a college. Am I right?
And one more thing I've just remembered:SB (you Americans use a lot more initials than the British and although I've managed to master some of them, many still escape me)
I have to admit I find initials and guessing what they stand for a great exercise, and besides they are very useful.
In some cases I choose to use the American word because it's a lot faster (I love talking about medicine and medical dramas...)
Some examples:
OR v. (operating theatre)
OB v. obstetrician or gynaecologist
CBC v. blood test
It's true that in some cases it's not only a distinction between continents but also a question of context. And aren't some vocab differences becoming blurry in this mass media world of ours?
OR = Operating Room (I don't think we call it a theatre here)
OB = Obstetrician ONLY (Gynecologist is a GYN)... which are two different specialties. There are doctors that are both so you would see OB/GYN behind their name
CBC = complete blood count
MIT = Massachusetts Institute of Technology

SB? I don't think I know what that stands for.

I guess the popularity of initials began also with the use of text messaging. Is text messaging not very popular in Europe?
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Old August 19, 2008, 03:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hawkgirl View Post
Hi Maria,

Yes, MIT is actually a school. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology. "jock" is used to label the guys who belong to sports teams, and usually they are popular

--Hawkgirl
Thanks so much. And by the way, I love your name. It makes me think of Pocahontas or something equally natural and graceful. Maybe because I'm 're watching' a lot of Disney movies (filmies, as he says) with my youngest at the moment.
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Old August 19, 2008, 03:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by poli View Post
We still have differences in vocabulary. For example (one among many) just ask for an aubergine, and you'll get a funny look.
I didn't give you a context for SB, but it referred to a personal quality, probably a defect if I remember correctly.
If you asked me for an aubergine I would give you an eggplant...
All the same, I think British people probably understand American words better than the other way around (most of the films we watch over here are still Hollywood productions...). At least the box office hits are.
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Old August 19, 2008, 03:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Elaina View Post
OR = Operating Room (I don't think we call it a theatre here)
OB = Obstetrician ONLY (Gynecologist is a GYN)... which are two different specialties. There are doctors that are both so you would see OB/GYN behind their name
CBC = complete blood count
MIT = Massachusetts Institute of Technology

SB? I don't think I know what that stands for.

I guess the popularity of initials began also with the use of text messaging. Is text messaging not very popular in Europe?
I know OB and GYN are different (tocólogo y ginecólogo), but I'm too lazy to make the distinction unless necessary and as you pointed out many of them are both.
Texting is really popular over here too. My daughter uses lots of initials, and so do British youngsters. Many of my friends (elderly citizens that we are), do the same too, even in mails, but I don't really know why, I'd rather use whole words.
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Old August 19, 2008, 04:26 PM
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María José,

Could the SB have been SOB?
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Old August 19, 2008, 08:54 PM
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Incidentially SOB means shortness of breath in the medical field
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Old August 19, 2008, 09:24 PM
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I don't know if it was one of María's medical dramas or the show with the jocks that the SB/SOB abbreviation came from. Let's see if she remembers any more context.
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