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Direct report, subordinate, employee

 

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  #1  
Old August 17, 2011, 06:02 PM
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Question

Hi, folks! New to the forums but I've been using Tomisimo for years.

I want to know a respectful, but specific, way to refer to a direct report. For example, what does a manager call her employees in a formal setting?

Is empleado sufficient, or too informal?
Would subordinado or subordinado directo be a good fit?
What about informe directo or reporte directo?

Thank you!!!

¿Tal vez dije algo que no les gusta? Veo que veinte personas leyeron mi pregunta, pero nadie respondió. Yo sé que la pregunta no está muy interesante--es para mi trabajo (traduciendo una encuesta para un cliente, y soy la única en la oficina que habla un poco de Español). ¿Puede alguien explicarme porque no recibi respuestas? ¡Muchas gracias!

Last edited by AngelicaDeAlquezar; August 18, 2011 at 03:45 PM. Reason: Merged back-to-back posts
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  #2  
Old August 18, 2011, 10:44 AM
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Sirve decir empleado o subordinado.
'Reporte directo' se usa, también.
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  #3  
Old August 18, 2011, 10:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by swifter View Post
¿Tal vez dije algo que no les gusta? Veo que veinte personas leyeron mi pregunta, pero nadie respondió. Yo sé que la pregunta no está muy interesante--es para mi trabajo (traduciendo una encuesta para un cliente, y soy la única en la oficina que habla un poco de Español). ¿Puede alguien explicarme porque no recibi respuestas? ¡Muchas gracias!
Bueno, aunque había leído tu pregunta, no sabía cómo contestártela...

De todos modos, ¡bienvenida a los foros!
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Old August 18, 2011, 12:08 PM
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gracias

¡Muchas gracias, Rusty y wrholt! Les agradezco mucho por responder.
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  #5  
Old August 18, 2011, 12:15 PM
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Originally Posted by swifter View Post
¿Tal vez dije algo que no les gusta? Veo que veinte personas leyeron mi pregunta, pero nadie respondió.
La leí por curiosidad, porque no conozco la frase hecha "direct report" (igual es un americanismo) y quería saber qué significa.
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Old August 18, 2011, 12:52 PM
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My problem is I don't know what "direct report" is. I also have a problem with the question :
Quote:
what does a manager call her employees in a formal setting?
Does it mean how she addresses them or how she refers to them?

In my opinion the word "subordinado" has a negative connotation. I'd use the word "empleado".

But again, I'm not too sure what the question means. (blame my English for that )

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Old August 18, 2011, 01:19 PM
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But again, I'm not too sure what the question means. (blame my English for that )
Join the club - I don't understand it either. And it's not my English that's the problem.
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Old August 18, 2011, 01:23 PM
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Ah, claro. Gracias por su respuesta.

Quote:
Originally Posted by pjt33 View Post
La leí por curiosidad, porque no conozco la frase hecha "direct report" (igual es un americanismo) y quería saber qué significa.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Luna Azul View Post
My problem is I don't know what "direct report" is. I also have a problem with the question :
Does it mean how she addresses them or how she refers to them?

(I meant how she refers to them, but it wasn't clear.)

In my opinion the word "subordinado" has a negative connotation. I'd use the word "empleado".

But again, I'm not too sure what the question means. (blame my English for that )

¡Claro! Tiene sentido entonces que no habia respuestas.

Gracias por decir que "subordinado" tiene una connotación negativa. A mi también, pero pensaba que estuvo bién preguntar.

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Originally Posted by Perikles View Post
Join the club - I don't understand it either. And it's not my English that's the problem.
¡Sí! Es una palabra muy especifico y formal en el mundo de business, y especialmente de H.R. (Human Resources).

Last edited by Rusty; August 18, 2011 at 02:41 PM. Reason: merged back-to-back posts
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Old August 18, 2011, 03:44 PM
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Join the club - I don't understand it either. And it's not my English that's the problem.
I'm glad I'm not the only one..

Quote:
Originally Posted by swifter View Post
Ah, claro. Gracias por su respuesta.

¡Claro! Tiene sentido entonces que no habia haya/haya habido respuestas.

Gracias por decir que "subordinado" tiene una connotación negativa. A mí también, pero pensaba pensé que estuvo estaba bien preguntar.

¡Sí! Es una palabra muy específica y formal en el mundo de business los negocios, y especialmente de H.R. (Human Resources). Se dice "recursos humanos" en español
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Old August 18, 2011, 11:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by swifter View Post
¡Sí! Es una palabra muy especifico y formal en el mundo de business, y especialmente de H.R. (Human Resources).
RR.HH. (Recursos Humanos)
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