#21  
Old August 18, 2009, 01:01 PM
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Originally Posted by irmamar View Post
It must be a typo, Empanada, surely he wanted to say "Los"
Oh ok no problem.

Thought it might be a rule I had not come across yet hence my asking.

Gracias irma
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  #22  
Old August 18, 2009, 11:48 PM
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Originally Posted by EmpanadaRica View Post
1. Cover = to cover a certain distance (not to cover with a blanket eg?).
E.g. we covered a stretch of 3 miles today?
If you use 'caminar' here would people usually assume you covered this distance walking or can it be used more generally?
caminar = to cover, advance, go, travel

Context will tell you whether it means they walked or they traveled.

Fue un largo viaje. Nos levantamos temprano y caminamos 3 tres horas antes de pararnos por gasolina y el desayuno.
It was a long trip. We got up early and drove for three hours before stopping for gas and breakfast.


If context does not otherwise give you a clue, then it would imply that you walked on foot.

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Originally Posted by EmpanadaRica View Post
2. To act. This strikes me as interesting because it seems rather different from the other meanings? In the translations list it is said to be 'to behave'.

So could one say e.g.:
'Ayer el niño (se?) caminó muy mal durante la cena' e.g.?
caminar = to act, behave.

Después de cometer un delito en su juventud, Juan cambió y caminó derecho el resto de sus días.
After committing a felony as a youth, Juan changed and behaved/acted properly the rest of his days.

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Originally Posted by EmpanadaRica View Post
3. Flow - Is this pertaining to a river or water flowing or more in figurative speech? e.g.
'El río camina del norte del país al sur' ?

Or can you also say this for instance about tears flowing, or a runny nose?
caminar = to flow

Yes, this pertains to rivers.
El río camina hacia el sur.
The river flows south.

I don't think you can use it for tears or a runny nose.

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Originally Posted by EmpanadaRica View Post
4. If you would use 'caminar' in terms of a journey or trip could you use this regardless of the type of vehicle or transportation (bike, train, car etc) or would it be more usual to use other verbs in that case?
I think it would be more usual to use other verbs in most cases.

Here's a bonus sentence for you. This might be only Mexican usage:

El carro no camina. = The car doesn't work.
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  #23  
Old August 19, 2009, 01:04 AM
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In Spain we don't use "caminar" for a river, we say: discurre, pasa, corre, cruza. I think that we use "caminar" in a poetic sense. Anyway, I'd never say "el río camina"

About the car, we say: el coche no anda.
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Old August 19, 2009, 06:23 AM
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Ok!

¡Gracias Tomisimo y Irmamar!

@ Irma: I have frequently heard my friend from Barcelona use 'andar' in this kind of context, not caminar.
So I think you are right that probably 'andar' is more likely used in Spain instead of 'caminar.'
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Last edited by EmpanadaRica; August 19, 2009 at 06:25 AM.
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  #25  
Old August 19, 2009, 08:06 AM
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Originally Posted by irmamar View Post
In Spain we don't use "caminar" for a river, we say: discurre, pasa, corre, cruza. I think that we use "caminar" in a poetic sense. Anyway, I'd never say "el río camina"

About the car, we say: el coche no anda.
I have heard: El carro no corre. o El motor no corre-o- no arranca
o- no prende.
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Old August 19, 2009, 12:36 PM
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Yes, andar is more often used than caminar.

We say coche instead of carro. You can say "el coche /motor no arranca" when the motor doesn't start, but if you start the motor and the car doesn't move at all, you'd say "el coche no anda, pongo la primera y ni se mueve"
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  #27  
Old August 21, 2009, 05:41 PM
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Yes, this pertains to rivers.
El río camina hacia el sur.
The river flows south.

I don't think you can use it for tears or a runny nose.
Out of curiosity, how would you say:

'Many a tear was flowing' (or something to that effect.. )

'To have a runny nose'
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  #28  
Old August 22, 2009, 12:59 AM
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El caballero guapo caminaba hacia su esposa mientras corría hacia él hasta que la distancía entre ellos fuera muy corta, entonces nos besaban

El coche viejo no andaba, entonces yo tenía que caminar al trabajo. Hoy lo vendía a un pobre (no quiero decir "sin dinero" sino "I feel sympathy for him" hombre. Le decía, "¡Diviértase!/¡diviértete!" al salir felizmente.
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  #29  
Old August 22, 2009, 01:09 AM
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Originally Posted by bobjenkins View Post
El caballero guapo caminaba hacia su esposa mientras corría hacia él hasta que la distancía entre ellos fuera muy corta, entonces nos besaban

El coche viejo no andaba, entonces yo tenía que caminar al trabajo. Hoy lo vendía a un pobre (no quiero decir "sin dinero" sino "I feel sympathy for him" hombre. Le decía, "¡Diviértase!/¡diviértete!" al salir felizmente.
El guapo caballero (en algunos casos es mejor anteponer el adjetivo al sustantivo) caminaba hacia su esposa mientras ella (aquí si no dices "ella" no se sabe quién corría -por cierto ¿por qué corría ella y él sólo caminaba ) corría hacia él, hasta que la distancia entre ellos fue muy corta. Entonces se besaron (se besaron entre ellos, si dices "nos besaron" es que nos besaron a nosotros )

El viejo coche no andaba, por lo que tenía que ir andando al trabajo. Hoy se lo vendí a un pobre. Firmado: Bobjenkins, el malo

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  #30  
Old August 22, 2009, 01:33 AM
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El guapo caballero (en algunos casos es mejor anteponer el adjetivo al sustantivo) caminaba hacia su esposa mientras ella (aquí si no dices "ella" no se sabe quién corría -por cierto ¿por qué corría ella y él sólo caminaba ) corría hacia él, hasta que la distancia entre ellos fue muy corta. Entonces se besaron (se besaron entre ellos, si dices "nos besaron" es que nos besaron a nosotros )

El viejo coche no andaba, por lo que tenía que ir andando al trabajo. Hoy se lo vendí a un pobre. Firmado: Bobjenkins, el malo



Preguntas muy importantes/válidas y sí, ya tengo curiosidad de la repuesta también..

'Nos besaron' .. ¿se puede decir alguien narcista?

¿Quál es la diferencia entre 'por lo que tenía' y 'para que tuviera' ?

Es que 'por lo que' expresa la razón, es decir la causa, y 'para que' expresa 'la meta', el propósito?

-Tengo mi propio coche para ir a mi trabajo cuando lo quiero.

-Tengo que trabajar muy duro, para que pudieras mantener tu propio coche para ir a tu trabajo cuando quieres.

- Esta mañana el coche no anduvo, por lo que tenía ir andando al trabajo.

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Last edited by EmpanadaRica; August 22, 2009 at 01:36 AM.
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