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  #1  
Old February 05, 2010, 11:04 AM
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More on pronouncing "g's"....

Before I ask my question, let's start with "ground rules" so that we're all using the same lingo. For the purposes of answering this question, let's say the following:
- when I say "hard g", I mean sounds like the word "agua"
- when I say "soft g", I mean sounds like the word "gente"

Now, on to my question....

I'm reading something about the pronunciation of the present indicative conjugations of the word "seguir". (sigo, sigues, sigue, seguimos, (seguís), siguen). The indication within this reading is that the "g" is pronounced differently in sigues, sigue and siguen. When I say "sigo", I use a hard "g" (like in "agua"). But I use the exact same sound for each of those six conjugations. Is that correct? Or are some of them pronounced differently?

Thanks!!
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  #2  
Old February 05, 2010, 11:10 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by laepelba View Post
Before I ask my question, let's start with "ground rules" so that we're all using the same lingo. For the purposes of answering this question, let's say the following:
- when I say "hard g", I mean sounds like the word "agua"
- when I say "soft g", I mean sounds like the word "gente"

Now, on to my question....

I'm reading something about the pronunciation of the present indicative conjugations of the word "seguir". (sigo, sigues, sigue, seguimos, (seguís), siguen). The indication within this reading is that the "g" is pronounced differently in sigues, sigue and siguen. When I say "sigo", I use a hard "g" (like in "agua"). But I use the exact same sound for each of those six conjugations. Is that correct? Or are some of them pronounced differently?

Thanks!!
Yes they are all pronounced the same way. you didn't need to specify the hard or soft "g" in this one.
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  #3  
Old February 05, 2010, 11:14 AM
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I just wanted to make sure to avoid the confusion that was created in a previous discussion when the native Spanish speakers used "hard" and "soft" exactly the opposite of the native English speakers............
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Old February 05, 2010, 11:24 AM
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"Ga" - "go" - "gu" are "suaves" (pronounced like "agua")

"Ge" - "gi" are "fuertes" (like in "gente")

"U" between "g" and "e" or "g" and "i" is not pronounced and it makes "g" sound "suave" (like in "agua")

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Old February 05, 2010, 11:55 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AngelicaDeAlquezar View Post
"Ga" - "go" - "gu" are "suaves" (pronounced like "agua")

"Ge" - "gi" are "fuertes" (like in "gente")

"U" between "g" and "e" or "g" and "i" is not pronounced and it makes "g" sound "suave" (like in "agua")

Thanks for those rules ... and, thus, all six forms of "seguir" in the present indicative have the "g" pronounced the same.......
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Old February 05, 2010, 12:09 PM
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Correct.

When "g" is "fuerte", the change in conjugation needs it to be replaced by a "j".
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Old February 05, 2010, 12:15 PM
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After experimenting I conclude that I pronounce them with a different pitch, because my lips are in different positions in preparation for the following vowel (o being more rounded).
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Old February 05, 2010, 12:38 PM
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Originally Posted by pjt33 View Post
After experimenting I conclude that I pronounce them with a different pitch, because my lips are in different positions in preparation for the following vowel (o being more rounded).
Not wishing to be argumentative, I don't quite see how a consonant can have a pitch.
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Old February 05, 2010, 12:39 PM
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Maybe this link is useful

Compare:

Seguir: siga (usted) - That's what you call "hard" and we call "suave"
Exigir: exija (usted) - And just on the contrary.

Proteger - tejer - the same sound (soft-fuerte)

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  #10  
Old February 05, 2010, 12:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by irmamar View Post
Maybe this link is useful
YES! That link is wonderful! Thank you!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by irmamar View Post
Compare:

Seguir: siga (usted) - That's what you call "hard" and we call "suave"
Exigir: exija (usted) - And just on the contrary.

Proteger - tejer - the same sound (soft-fuerte)

I definitely understand those sounds. I was just wondering if there is really a difference in the "g's" in the conjugation of seguir... THANKS!!
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