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  #21  
Old August 22, 2013, 09:52 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Liquinn3 View Post
French, personally. Though Portuguese would be cool to learn. I do remember learning it in school and I hated it. I guess it's different when you want to learn it.
Mi hermana tenía un maestro de español antipatico en la universidad y se hizo que no quieria aprender español. La mayoría de la gente no aprende a hablar una segunda lengua en la escuela de todas modas y aún peor con un maestro no muy bueno. Sin embargo, si alguien está aprendiendo a hablar español en la calle y va a la escuela, entonces eso es lo mejor. Ser altamente motivado es, después de todo, lo más importante para aprender español.
Tú Liquinn estás altamente motivado para aprender español por lo que estás muy bien.

Francés parece ser el más difícil de las lenguas latinas para aprender.
El español e el italiano tienen una pronunciación muy similar y el
portugués es muy similar en el vocabulario del español y tiene
un pronuciation mucho más cerca de español que el francés. Sin
embargo conocí un hombre frances en Mexico que hablaba el español
muy bien. El decia que era facil para él aprender el español porque
hablaba frances. Esto quiere decir que conociendo una lengua latina
hace que es mas facil aprender otra lengua latina. Capisci?

Last edited by Villa; August 22, 2013 at 10:01 AM.
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  #22  
Old August 22, 2013, 10:01 AM
Liquinn3 Liquinn3 is offline
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Originally Posted by Villa View Post
Mi hermana tenía un maestro de español antipatico en la universidad y se hizo que no quieria aprender español. La mayoría de la gente no aprende a hablar una segunda lengua en la escuela. Sin embargo, si alguien está aprendiendo a hablar español en la calle y va a la escuela, entonces eso es lo mejor. Ser altamente motivado es, después de todo, lo más importante para aprender español.
Tú Liquinn estás altamente motivado para aprender español por lo que estás muy bien.

Francés parece ser el más difícil de las lenguas latinas para aprender.
El español e el italiano tienen una pronunciación muy similar y el
portugués es muy similar en el vocabulario del español y tiene
un pronuciation mucho más cerca de español que el francés. Sin
embargo conocí un hombre frances en Mexico que hablaba el español
muy bien. El decia que era facil para él aprender el español porque
hablaba frances. Esto quiere decir que conociendo una lengua latina
hace que es mas facil aprender otra lengua latina. Capisci?
Gracias por tu infamación, Villa. Quiero aprender francés pero me encanta mi segunda lengua. ¿Por qué es difícil francesa? Estoy aprendiendo poco a poco. Pienso que el subjuntivo es muy fácil.
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  #23  
Old August 22, 2013, 10:10 AM
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Originally Posted by Liquinn3 View Post
Gracias por tu infamación, Villa. Quiero aprender francés pero me encanta mi segunda lengua. ¿Por qué es difícil francesa? Estoy aprendiendo poco a poco. Pienso que el subjuntivo es muy fácil.
Mira amiguito, no es exatamente que es difícil aprender frances es que es más fácil aprender el español, el italiano y el portuguese. Las vocales por ejemplo en el español son iquales que el italiano. Las vocales y otros sonidos son muy diferente en el frances. Asi que es mas facil aprender el español, el italian y el portuguese que el frances. O sea, si ya una persona sabe hablar el español entonces va a encontra más facil el italiano y el portuguese. Ora comprendi amico? Ahora comprendes amigo?
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  #24  
Old September 04, 2013, 02:59 AM
tetsuo tetsuo is offline
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Maybe you'd get confused if you pick up Dutch and Afrikaans or Flemish at the same time. I can't really compare those three languages but they must be very similar.
They are very similar. A big part of Belgium (the one close the Dutch border) speaks Dutch as well and mostly. Flemish is available throughout the country. The Belgian part close to the French border speaks French (instead of Dutch). ut I guess some people speak Dutch there, too, and also people will speak French in the "Dutch"-part of Belgium. If you speak the German dialect Friesisch you already have mastered a big part of Dutch. In the northern part of Dutch (the part close to the German border, not the one with Amsterdam / Zandvoort etc.) speaks a Dutch dialect also called Friesisch. No suprise this part is called Friesland, too. A German part (northern islands) are called Ostfriesland. As for Afrikaans I'd guess it's the same as like Spanish to Portuguese. Some different words for the same meaning (Afrikaans: kombuis; Dutch: keuken - meaning cocina / kitchen) (Anecdote for the German learners: kitchen in German is a synonym for prison).

You wouldn't do that but I like to mention it, just in case: Don't do jokes about how fast Germany conquered the Netherlands in WW2. They will be mad forever. That's a standard info efore you travel to the Netherlands. At least it was for me and many others. Just as if we would say something like this.
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  #25  
Old September 04, 2013, 12:43 PM
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poli poli is offline
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Originally Posted by tetsuo View Post
They are very similar. A big part of Belgium (the one close the Dutch border) speaks Dutch as well and mostly. Flemish is available throughout the country. The Belgian part close to the French border speaks French (instead of Dutch). ut I guess some people speak Dutch there, too, and also people will speak French in the "Dutch"-part of Belgium. If you speak the German dialect Friesisch you already have mastered a big part of Dutch. In the northern part of Dutch (the part close to the German border, not the one with Amsterdam / Zandvoort etc.) speaks a Dutch dialect also called Friesisch. No suprise this part is called Friesland, too. A German part (northern islands) are called Ostfriesland. As for Afrikaans I'd guess it's the same as like Spanish to Portuguese. Some different words for the same meaning (Afrikaans: kombuis; Dutch: keuken - meaning cocina / kitchen) (Anecdote for the German learners: kitchen in German is a synonym for prison).

You wouldn't do that but I like to mention it, just in case: Don't do jokes about how fast Germany conquered the Netherlands in WW2. They will be mad forever. That's a standard info efore you travel to the Netherlands. At least it was for me and many others. Just as if we would say something like this.
Any jovial comments about Nazi victories coming from Germans almost anywhere in the world would probably be coldly received unless you are addressing skin heads. This is not just something you would come across in Holland.
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Last edited by poli; September 04, 2013 at 12:45 PM.
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  #26  
Old September 04, 2013, 01:02 PM
tetsuo tetsuo is offline
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Since we were talking about Netherlands I mentioned it.
I wouldn't say this kind of jokes in no country.

But IF I would make jokes like that, it wouldn't mean I like what they did. It could just mean I have a crazy sense of humour. (Just saying, it isn't actually the case...)
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  #27  
Old September 04, 2013, 01:23 PM
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I don't think it would work in the United State either even as a joke unless of course you're with a bunch of white supremacists or people who no nothing about twentieth century history.
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  #28  
Old September 22, 2015, 11:30 AM
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For those who have learnt Spanish and then commence learning Portuguese the difficulties arise when you're attempting colloquial conversation and sometimes when you can't recall the word for sure and attempt what you believe might be right from the Spanish and you come unstuck.

Frango/pollo; ananás/piña; janela/ventana; preto/negro; vermelho/rojo; jantar/cenar o comer, are just a few that spring to mind - there are many, many more.

I found that on the few occasions when I've attempted to converse in Portuguese usually with tourists in Barcelona I've invariably lapsed into Castllian.

Which makes me doubly unpopular because the Portuguese would prefer Portuguese and the barceloneses want Catalàn!
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Last edited by Sancho Panther; September 22, 2015 at 11:33 AM.
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  #29  
Old June 30, 2017, 07:53 PM
Glen Glen is offline
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I found this thread now almost 2 years on, while thinking of studying Portuguese for the first time.

One thing that strikes me immediately is the contrast with Spanish as regards vowel sounds. For example, their senhor - "sayn-yohr" - and queimar - "kay-mahr" - remind me of a careless English speaker who is not paying attention to emphasizing the purity of the Spanish vowels in Señor and quemar. Understand, I mean no disrespect to anyone, just that I heard a speaker of certain dialect of English say "health" as something like hay-ulth, making it essentially a two-syllable word.

So, being a careless English speaker myself, should that fact alone encourage me to take the plunge?

Not to mention the fact that I'd get to say the consonants b, d and v in the English-style, right?

Last edited by Glen; July 02, 2017 at 07:24 PM.
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