Ask a Question

(Create a thread)
Go Back   Spanish language learning forums > Spanish & English Languages > Grammar


Para or Por

 

This is the place for questions about conjugations, verb tenses, adverbs, adjectives, word order, syntax and other grammar questions for English or Spanish.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #21  
Old March 19, 2010, 12:30 PM
Here4good Here4good is offline
Pearl
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: En un pueblo grande cerca de Madrid
Posts: 198
Native Language: inglés/ British English
Here4good is on a distinguished road
Fun video by some high school students trying to explain por y para in a rap!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fd0dl...eature=related
Reply With Quote
   
Get rid of these ads by registering for a free Tomísimo account.
  #22  
Old March 20, 2010, 01:41 AM
xchic's Avatar
xchic xchic is offline
Pearl
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Spain
Posts: 255
Native Language: English English!
xchic is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by Here4good View Post
Fun video by some high school students trying to explain por y para in a rap!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fd0dl...eature=related
Not as good as the Ser v Estar one , but I like it
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old May 18, 2010, 12:40 AM
wafflestomp wafflestomp is offline
Pearl
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Long Island, New York
Posts: 350
Native Language: American English
wafflestomp is on a distinguished road
In the song "Por ti volaré" why do you use "por" rather than para? I was under the impression that when talking about doing something for somebody, you use "para" -- ie: "Èste ordenador es para ti"
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old May 18, 2010, 01:21 AM
irmamar's Avatar
irmamar irmamar is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 7,071
Native Language: Español
irmamar is on a distinguished road
You are the cause: volaré por ti.

But you can say: hacer algo por alguien with two meanings:

1. I do something because of you:

Trabajo por ti, porque quiero ganar dinero para pagarte los estudios (cause).

2. I do something instead of you:

Hago el trabajo por ti (en tu lugar).

Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old May 18, 2010, 09:10 AM
chileno's Avatar
chileno chileno is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Las Vegas, USA
Posts: 7,863
Native Language: Castellano
chileno is on a distinguished road
Besides, that "volaré para ti"= "I will fly for you" also means "that I will show you how I fly." Right?
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old May 19, 2010, 10:29 PM
wafflestomp wafflestomp is offline
Pearl
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Long Island, New York
Posts: 350
Native Language: American English
wafflestomp is on a distinguished road
Alright, I'm understanding it now. Thanks to the two of you guys
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old July 16, 2010, 07:56 AM
dvisto dvisto is offline
Opal
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 4
dvisto is on a distinguished road
The following chart shows some of the major uses of these two prepositions.

Uses for por:

Expressing movement along, through, around, by or about: Anduve por las calles de la ciudad. I walked through the streets of the city.

Denoting a time or duration when something occurs. Viajamos por tres semanas. We're traveling for three weeks.

Expressing the cause not the purpose) of an action: Me caí por la nieve. I fell down because of the snow.

Meaning per: Dos por ciento.Two percent.

Meaning supporting or in favor of: Trabajamos por derechos humanos. We work for human rights.

Introducing the agent of an action after a passive verb: Fue escrito por Bob Woodward. It was written by Bob Woodward.

Indicating means of transportation: Viajaré por avión. I will travel by plane.

Used in numerous expressions: Por ejemplo. For example. Por favor. Please.

Uses for para:

Meaning for the purpose of or in order to: Para bailar la bamba, necesita una poca de gracia. In order to dance the bamba you need a little grace.

With a noun or pronoun as object, meaning for the benefit of or directed to: Es para usted. It's for you.

Meaning to or in the direction of when referring to a specific place: Voy para Europa. I'm heading to Europe.

Meaning by or for when referring to a specific time: Necesito el regalo para mañana. I need the gift for tomorrow. Vamos a la casa de mi madre para el fin de semana. We're going to my mother's for the weekend.
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old July 19, 2010, 03:02 AM
irmamar's Avatar
irmamar irmamar is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 7,071
Native Language: Español
irmamar is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by dvisto View Post
The following chart shows some of the major uses of these two prepositions.

Uses for por:

Expressing movement along, through, around, by or about: Anduve por las calles de la ciudad. I walked through the streets of the city.

Denoting a time or duration when something occurs. Viajamos por tres semanas. We're traveling for three weeks.

It depends on the country. I'd say: "viajamos durante tres semanas".

Expressing the cause not the purpose) of an action: Me caí por la nieve. I fell down because of the snow.

Be careful. This sentence could mean that you fell on the snow. I'd say: "me caí a causa de la nieve" to avoid ambiguity.

Meaning per: Dos por ciento.Two percent.

Meaning supporting or in favor of: Trabajamos por los derechos humanos. We work for human rights.

Introducing the agent of an action after a passive verb: Fue escrito por Bob Woodward. It was written by Bob Woodward.

Indicating means of transportation: Viajaré por avión. I will travel by plane.

The same as the second sentence. I wouldn't say "viajar por avión", but "viajar en avión".

Used in numerous expressions: Por ejemplo. For example. Por favor. Please.

Uses for para:

Meaning for the purpose of or in order to: Para bailar la bamba, se necesita una poca de gracia. In order to dance the bamba you need a little grace.

With a noun or pronoun as object, meaning for the benefit of or directed to: Es para usted. It's for you.

Meaning to or in the direction of when referring to a specific place: Voy para Europa. I'm heading to Europe.

A o para.

Meaning by or for when referring to a specific time: Necesito el regalo para mañana. I need the gift for tomorrow. Vamos a la casa de mi madre para el fin de semana. We're going to my mother's for the weekend.
Vamos a casa de mi madre el fin de semana (sin para)/ vamos a pasar el fin de semana a casa de mi madre.
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old July 19, 2010, 09:15 AM
AngelicaDeAlquezar's Avatar
AngelicaDeAlquezar AngelicaDeAlquezar is offline
Obsidiana
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Mexico City
Posts: 8,068
Native Language: Mexican Spanish
AngelicaDeAlquezar is on a distinguished road
I mostly agree with Irma.

- I wouldn't use "por" instead of "durante".

- "Por avión" used to be a literal translation of French "par avion", to indicate that ordinary mail should be sent by plane, so sending something via air transport is the only case I can think of when some people would use "por avión" instead of "en avión".

- However, I have to disagree about the case of "me caí por la nieve".
"Por" can be actually used to give a reference about the place where something has happened, but not exactly the place:
· Me caí por el faro. (I fell somewhere nearby the lighthouse.)
· Tuvimos el accidente por Mérida. (We had the accident somewhere nearby Mérida.)
In these cases, "por" is not a cause, but a place around which something has happened. There is no immediate ambiguity in the meaning, because one wouldn't expect a lighthouse to be the cause of someone falling down, or a city the cause of someone having an accident.
In the case of the snow, I wouldn't find any ambigüity either, because falling somewhere around or nearby the snow would sound strange to me (as if it would be concentrated only in one spot).
We would say "me caí en la nieve" to say "I fell on the snow".


And by the way, here it's correct to say "voy a casa de mi madre para el fin de semana". Although speakers might not be fully aware of it, it's an ellipsis that's felt as saying "...para pasar el fin de semana".
Still, it's colloquial and the right expressions are those Irma suggested.
__________________
Ain't it wonderful to be alive when the Rock'n'Roll plays...
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old July 20, 2010, 01:50 AM
irmamar's Avatar
irmamar irmamar is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 7,071
Native Language: Español
irmamar is on a distinguished road
Bueno, "caerse por" da un sentido de extensión, como si algo se desparramara: caerse por las escaleras, caerse las monedas por el suelo, etc. No diría "caer por el suelo" (una persona o ciertos objetos de un tamaño ya considerable; sí, sin embargo, unas monedas o pequeños objetos). También diría "caer por la nieve" porque vas resbalando y no caes en un punto fijo (si la nieve está helada, claro):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-sTPFWnmvFI

Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmark this thread at:

Tags
por vs para, pronoun order, pronouns, r.i.d., vocab comparison, vs

 

Link to this thread
URL: 
HTML Link: 
BB Code: 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts
BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Site Rules

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Para todo mal, mezcal; Para todo bien, también Tomisimo Culture 14 July 24, 2009 10:08 PM
Por siempre / para siempre Tomisimo Vocabulary 4 July 30, 2008 10:32 PM
Help - Vistas por ultima vez corriendo por el pasillo dani87 Vocabulary 5 March 11, 2008 03:57 PM
Para vs Por bleitzow Grammar 7 January 30, 2008 06:40 AM
por and para fullbite Grammar 2 July 07, 2007 02:47 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:39 AM.

Forum powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

X