#11  
Old August 29, 2009, 05:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ookami View Post
I believe you can use all options but NO 'Aún' at the first choice, it's 'Aunque' or the other, but in the phrase you wrote (put/placed sounds strange here) I would say:

Aunque no tengo zapatos quiero caminar a la tienda.


If you add "... no shoes I still want..." then yes, you can use any of those options (I repeat but NO 'Aún at the first choise it's 'Aunque' or the other). I would say:

Aunque no tenga zapatos yo aún quiero caminar a la tienda.

If you say: Aun no tengo zapatos yo todavía quiero caminar a la tienda.
It's like: I still don't have shoes. I still/ Yet I want to walk to the store.
gracias por la buena explicación! Lo agradezco
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  #12  
Old August 29, 2009, 01:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ookami View Post
If you say: Aun no tengo zapatos yo todavía quiero caminar a la tienda.
It's like: I still don't have shoes. I still/ Yet I want to walk to the store.
Hmm.. I am not sure there is any real difference in 'duration' between 'still/still not' and 'not yet'..?

Thing is, in Dutch we use 'nog (niet)' and 'nog steeds (niet)'. The latter implaying that something 'still has not' happened yet, whereas the first just says ' not yet'. The latter implies a longer period of time waiting, and also some impatience by the person saying it.

I have always interpreted this to be more or less the difference between 'aún' and 'todavia'.

I mean ' He isn't here yet' to me sounds more 'neutral' and not as impatient as e.g. ' He still isn't here yet..' or 'He's still not here' ..

Am I correct in the assumption that this slight difference between time elapsed /degree of impatience is implied also between the use of 'aún' being the more neutral option, and 'todavia' meaning more 'still not ...(yet)' in combination with 'no' ?
Or is this a distinction I just assumed due to these words being used slightly differently in my native tongue?
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  #13  
Old August 29, 2009, 09:36 PM
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For me they are synonyms. In English you don't use "yet..." and "still" as synonyms? I have learned them as if they were that.
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Old August 29, 2009, 09:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ookami View Post
For me they are synonyms. In English you don't use "yet..." and "still" as synonyms? I have learned them as if they were that.
No - I don't use them as synonyms. There is a difference in usage....

YET:
- I haven't purchased my textbook yet.
- I have yet to go to the grocery store to buy eggs.

STILL:
- I am still waiting to buy my textbooks, as the prices may go down.
- I still haven't gone to the grocery store to buy eggs.

Do you see the slight difference?
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Old August 29, 2009, 10:11 PM
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I can't see a clear difference, sorry. I see their meaning as the same. What's the difference?
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Old August 29, 2009, 10:53 PM
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Hmmmm..... Take a look at this link: http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=1378938

I see that they specify that "yet" indicates something that will happen at a future point in time. "Still" indicates something that has been an ongoing process........
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  #17  
Old August 30, 2009, 06:46 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by laepelba View Post
Hmmmm..... Take a look at this link: http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=1378938

I see that they specify that "yet" indicates something that will happen at a future point in time. "Still" indicates something that has been an ongoing process........

Yes I agree with Lou Ann - to me also there is a subtle but clear difference in the use of 'yet' and 'still' . Indeed 'yet' refers to future and 'still' is a combination of something ongoing & still to happen or be done/completed in future.

Also I think still, probably because it is ongoing/ has been ongoing, implies that something is taking more time than 'yet'.

' I haven't done it yet' - could refer to something you just found out you had to do for instance, and haven't done just yet.

' I still haven't done it yet' means you planned to, or should have - some time elapsed since you have known you had to do it, but you still haven't come round to doing it.

For example:

'My friend asked me to go get the groceries but I haven't done it yet, because I just came home from work'.

'I asked you to go to the supermarket 4 hours ago when you got home..Now I am back from my errants and you still haven't done it!'

So I am wondering if there is a difference like this in the use of 'aún' and 'todavia' also, or are they used similarly, and is there no difference implied?
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Last edited by EmpanadaRica; August 30, 2009 at 06:49 AM.
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  #18  
Old August 30, 2009, 07:31 AM
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¿Aún estáis con el "todavía"? o... ¿todavía estáis con el "aún"? (a little joke)

No hay diferencia, son sinónimos. Ni siquiera una pequeña diferencia, nada. Quizá es más usada "todavía" que "aún", pero no mucho más.
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  #19  
Old August 30, 2009, 08:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by irmamar View Post
¿Aún estáis con el "todavía"? o... ¿todavía estáis con el "aún"? (a little joke)

No hay diferencia, son sinónimos. Ni siquiera una pequeña diferencia, nada. Quizá es más usada "todavía" que "aún", pero no mucho más.
Hola amiga! Siquiera es una nueva palabra para mí ,

¿La frase es correcta?

Nunca he vivido a cerca del mar, pero siquiera lo he visto.
I've never lived by the sea, but atleast I have seen it.

Cuídate!
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  #20  
Old August 30, 2009, 09:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by laepelba View Post
No - I don't use them as synonyms. There is a difference in usage....

YET:
- I haven't purchased my textbook yet.
- I have yet to go to the grocery store to buy eggs.

STILL:
- I am still waiting to buy my textbooks, as the prices may go down.
- I still haven't gone to the grocery store to buy eggs.

Do you see the slight difference?

Can I say:

Is it grammatically correct?

I still haven't purchased my textbook.

etc...
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