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Indirect object pronouns

 

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  #1  
Old February 04, 2013, 09:27 PM
Eduardo256 Eduardo256 is offline
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Indirect object pronouns

Would this sentence ever be used, or is this a bad example? Seems like double use of "them". I understand using "ellos" to make "them" more specific. Am I correct in being confused? Any thoughts?

"No les voy a comprar nada a ellos."*



*example from Living Language Spanish course
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  #2  
Old February 04, 2013, 09:32 PM
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In a real-life situation, you would most likely not say the indirect object, as it would be understood.
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Old February 04, 2013, 09:39 PM
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Seems fine to me.

"No les voy a comprar nada a ellos."

Some times Spanish may be "redundant", but that is not uncommon.

Te lo explicaré.
Te lo explicaré a ti para que lo entiendas. (This may be a bit too emphatic, but not incorrect.)

Se lo explicaré a ella. (In this case "a ella" needed to clarify.)

So, yes, "a ellos" makes it more specific.

Oh, I agree with Rusty. On a verbal level, and on specific contexts you may have a lot of play...
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Last edited by JPablo; February 04, 2013 at 09:42 PM. Reason: Didn't see Rusty's entry
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Old February 04, 2013, 10:24 PM
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Gracias para hacer este claro

In everyday conversation, which sentence would be used the most?

"Carlos te quiere conocer" or "Carlos quiere conocerte"?* Conocerte seems easier.



*from Living Language Spanish lesson

Last edited by AngelicaDeAlquezar; February 04, 2013 at 10:57 PM. Reason: Merged back-to-back posts
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Old February 04, 2013, 10:58 PM
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In daily speech, both are equally accepted, although "conocerte" is better, because the pronoun is attached to the verb which actually is related to it.
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Old February 04, 2013, 11:29 PM
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I agree with Angélica...

Like the Miguel Ríos song,

Yo sí quiero conocerte y tú no a mí...
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Old February 04, 2013, 11:40 PM
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Old February 05, 2013, 01:21 AM
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Lo propio de la verdad es que se basta a sí misma, aquel que la posee no intenta convencer a nadie.
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Old February 05, 2013, 04:57 PM
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"...quiere conocerte" is more elegant. The lower the education, the more people tend to use "te quiere conocer" exclusively. The alternation of both ways is the practical rule.

The model "...quiere conocerte" is better for students, as it catches some potential mistakes to be made by using the other structure. For instance, you know ir is basically go and irse is basically leave. Most people say "Carlos se quiere ir" (intended as "Carlos wants to leave", but it should be parsed like "Carlos loves himself go") which was traditionally considered a wrong use, instead of the proper "Carlos quiere irse". The fact that other phrases like "Carlos se puede ir" ("Carlos can leave") are 100% correct is a bit confusing, even for educated native speakers.
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