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“Hasta luego hija”

 

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  #1  
Old December 13, 2017, 02:38 AM
Marleebot Marleebot is offline
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Question “Hasta luego hija”

Today at the post office in Casares, Spain where I am visiting, as I was leaving one of the women who worked there who I had been communicating with said “hasta luego hija.” Obviously this translates to “see you later, daughter” but since I am not her daughter, what did she really mean?

Is it equivalent to saying, “see you later, honey/sweetheart/dear?”
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  #2  
Old December 13, 2017, 05:19 AM
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Yes, you have the right idea. It was simply a term of endearment.
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Old December 13, 2017, 07:15 PM
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Totally agree with Rusty.

DRAE (Diccionario de la Real Academia Española) gives the right definition (# 5)

http://dle.rae.es/?id=KOGiy39

5. m. y f. U. como expresión de cariño entre las personas que se quieren bien.

Although I have heard it, among people who are just a passing acquaintance.
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Old December 16, 2017, 12:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marleebot View Post
Today at the post office in Casares, Spain where I am visiting, as I was leaving one of the women who worked there who I had been communicating with said “hasta luego hija.” Obviously this translates to “see you later, daughter” but since I am not her daughter, what did she really mean?

Is it equivalent to saying, “see you later, honey/sweetheart/dear?”
also, hasta luego maja.
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Old December 16, 2017, 05:16 PM
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Originally Posted by ROBINDESBOIS View Post
also, hasta luego maja.
also, hasta luego mija.
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Old December 17, 2017, 12:17 AM
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When I was visiting Central America for several weeks at age 17, occasionally an older female street vendor would call me "mijo" when responding to some question of mine during the transaction. I suspect that these women reserved "mijo/mija" for young people, and probably went with "señor/señora" for a customer who was closer to their own age.
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Old December 18, 2017, 02:43 AM
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majo/maja is not mijo/mija it´s a different story glory
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