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Old June 21, 2009, 01:24 PM
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Ain't and 'cause

I've heard in songs "ain't" instead "I'm not , he's not, etc." and "cause" instead of "because". I'd like to know if it's not formal English or it is slang, such as "wanna" or "gonna".

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Old June 21, 2009, 02:06 PM
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well, I'm not sure if it's slang, but I know Ain't isn't really proper English, and well, my English teacher told me not to use it in writing
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Old June 21, 2009, 02:10 PM
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slang

hi irmamar - there's a saying in english - " 'ain't' ain't in the dictionary"

the use of "ain't" often imparts a sense of rural speech, inner city speech,
or other "flavor", sometimes humorous.

so, yes, it's like gonna/wanna - a contraction much used but technically
incorrect.

hermit
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Old June 21, 2009, 02:44 PM
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'cause (written with an apostrophe) is extremely common in spoken English although it would be less common in formal registers (a presentation, business setting, university lecture, etc). ain't is also quite common but is used more in the informal registers (rural people, auto mechanics, construction workers, inner city etc.). It is also really common in songs for some reason. It would never be used in the more formal registers.

Both of these are used in spoken English, but not written English, unless it is written conversation intended to evoke the registers where you would use those words in spoken language.
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Old June 21, 2009, 03:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tomisimo View Post
'cause (written with an apostrophe) is extremely common in spoken English although it would be less common in formal registers (a presentation, business setting, university lecture, etc). ain't is also quite common but is used more in the informal registers (rural people, auto mechanics, construction workers, inner city etc.). It is also really common in songs for some reason. It would never be used in the more formal registers..

In England most people will sometimes use "'cause or cos" and "ain't" in everyday speech: "Ain't it" is often shortened to "innit", although it is not usually written.
In Northern England people sometimes say "Summat" and "Nowt" for "Something and Nothing". My mother-in-law once said to me "Your daughter has just said "SUMMAT". I replied: "its better than saying "NOWT" INNIT?"

Both of these are used in spoken English, but not written English, unless it is written conversation intended to evoke the registers where you would use those words in spoken language
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Old June 21, 2009, 08:25 PM
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Hola Irmamar

Los niños aquí dicen, "ain't ain't a word and I ain't gunna say it."

Ain't y 'cause son jargon/slang/argot.

A veces ellos los usamos cuando estan hablamos.
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Old June 21, 2009, 09:05 PM
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No matter the arguments to the contrary, ain't is a word (has been since the 1770s) and it is in the dictionary. Its usage is considered non-standard in every dictionary I checked, but it is used in the everyday speech of most people. I personally never use it, but everyone else in my family does. "Resistance is futile," as the Borg would have us believe.

You need to be familiar with colloquial speech, as you'll be exposed to it quite frequently on most streets in America. There are ways to write colloquial speech, as well, but you would never expect to see it in formal writing. We do speak the language differently than the way it is formally taught - just like Spanish, in spoken form, doesn't quite match the written form.

Nuff's been said 'bout how we speak, but I think song lyrics push the envelope just a tad.

Last edited by Rusty; June 21, 2009 at 09:14 PM.
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Old June 22, 2009, 12:40 AM
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Yes, I saw "ain't" in the dictionary.

I want to know colloquial speech, but I want to know that it is colloquial one, to avoid writing in a bad way. I prefer writing in formal English, by the moment at least.

I don't understand everything your wrote, Rusty. What is "the Borg"? I didn't find "nuff" or "bout" either. Thanks

Brute, I hadn't ever heard the words you said. I'll have to study them.

Thanks everybody
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Old June 22, 2009, 10:12 AM
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The Borg is an alien 'race' from the 'Star Trek: Next Generation' TV series.

nuff's = enough has (colloquial pronunciation and spelling, with a contraction)
about = 'bout (colloquial pronunciation)

Last edited by Rusty; June 22, 2009 at 10:14 AM.
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Old June 22, 2009, 10:16 AM
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How 'bout "y'all"? It's often seen cavorting around with "ain't".
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